Best Defense

Thomas E. Ricks' daily take on national security.

The Pentagon wants to hear from you

I guess the Pentagon liked the Best Defense essay contests so much that they are starting their own

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14578464505_d3e5457f07_b

I guess they liked the Best Defense essay contests so much that they are starting their own. Anyway, the policy wing of the Office of the Secretary of Defense (that is, the wing without money), is asking to hear from people who have answers to the following questions:

-- How can the U.S. military more effectively and efficiently project power in the face of massed or mobile precision attacks -- for example, cruise and ballistic missile salvos and swarming?

-- Given current U.S. global military posture and potential changes in the character of war, how must future U.S. operational battle networks change to accomplish counter-power projection operations in contested theaters against large state adversaries?

I guess they liked the Best Defense essay contests so much that they are starting their own. Anyway, the policy wing of the Office of the Secretary of Defense (that is, the wing without money), is asking to hear from people who have answers to the following questions:

— How can the U.S. military more effectively and efficiently project power in the face of massed or mobile precision attacks — for example, cruise and ballistic missile salvos and swarming?

— Given current U.S. global military posture and potential changes in the character of war, how must future U.S. operational battle networks change to accomplish counter-power projection operations in contested theaters against large state adversaries?

— How must Joint Force operational and organizational constructs change to allow combat operations involving multi-domain battle against adversaries with battle network/guided munitions parity?

— How must Joint Force operational and organizational constructs change as adversaries exploit crowdsourced information and commercially available intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance technologies such as drones and commercial space systems?

— How can the U.S. military ensure that the speed of its decision-making continues to keep pace with the accelerating speed of action on the battlefield due to automation, artificial intelligence, hypersonics, cyber weapons and other factors? “

If you think you have the answer, you can let them know by writing it up in less than four pages and sending it to them before the end of this month at osd.pentagon.ousd-policy.mbx.operational-challenges@mail.mil.

If you CC it to me, I might publish it too!

They don’t say what first prize is. I’d suggest lunch in the Pentagon cafeteria. Second prize, of course, would be two lunches.

Photo credit: Wikimedia Commons

Thomas E. Ricks covered the U.S. military from 1991 to 2008 for the Wall Street Journal and then the Washington Post. He can be reached at ricksblogcomment@gmail.com. Twitter: @tomricks1

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