The Cable

15 Questions Malik Obama Has Posed on Twitter This November

Obama's half-brother wants the answers.

Malik Obama, a step brother to US Democratic presidential hopeful Barak Obama, talks with the aid of a bulhorn November 2, 2008 to villagers at Kogelo, the Obama's rural home in Siaya district during a football match he sponsored in honour of Barak Obama's anticipated victory in the US polls on November 04. Excitement continues to mount in Kisumu, the headquarter of Kenya's Western province as the 'Son of Kenya', a term increasingly used to refer to Barak given his fathers Kenyan origins, as Obama continues to lead his main rival, Republican John McCain in preliminary polls two days to the historic vote.        AFP PHOTO    Tony KARUMBA        (Photo credit should read TONY KARUMBA/AFP/Getty Images)
Malik Obama, a step brother to US Democratic presidential hopeful Barak Obama, talks with the aid of a bulhorn November 2, 2008 to villagers at Kogelo, the Obama's rural home in Siaya district during a football match he sponsored in honour of Barak Obama's anticipated victory in the US polls on November 04. Excitement continues to mount in Kisumu, the headquarter of Kenya's Western province as the 'Son of Kenya', a term increasingly used to refer to Barak given his fathers Kenyan origins, as Obama continues to lead his main rival, Republican John McCain in preliminary polls two days to the historic vote. AFP PHOTO Tony KARUMBA (Photo credit should read TONY KARUMBA/AFP/Getty Images)

President Barack Obama’s older half brother, Malik, once a strong Barack supporter, endorsed Donald Trump’s presidential run in July. Malik served as best man at Barack and Michelle’s wedding and told GQ in 2013 that he shares his half brothers leadership qualities because “it’s all in the genes,” but has since begun to feel jilted by the president. “He hasn’t supported me at all,” Malik said of Barack, referring to a foundation the elder brother founded in their father’s name.

Malik’s flamboyant personality found an audience during the 2016 election — his support for Trump made him a celebrity, and he attended a presidential debate in Las Vegas at Trump’s invitation.

Over the past few weeks, Malik has posed a number of striking questions on Twitter, which in aggregate read as a chronicle of our times. We’ve collected them here.

Photo credit: TONY KARUMBA/AFP/Getty Images

Benjamin Soloway is an associate editor at Foreign Policy. @bsoloway

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