Argument

An expert's point of view on a current event.

Democracy Lab Weekly Brief, November 28, 2016

To keep up with Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter and Facebook.  This week’s recommended reads: In the Financial Times, Edward Luce warns that Donald Trump’s election will hasten the decline of the United States’ power in the world. Also in FT, Andrew Byrne reports on growing evidence that Moscow is nurturing ...

gettyimages-626249620-crop
gettyimages-626249620-crop

To keep up with Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter and Facebook. 

This week’s recommended reads:

In the Financial Times, Edward Luce warns that Donald Trump’s election will hasten the decline of the United States’ power in the world. Also in FT, Andrew Byrne reports on growing evidence that Moscow is nurturing ties to far-right extremists in Hungary.

To keep up with Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter and Facebook. 

This week’s recommended reads:

In the Financial Times, Edward Luce warns that Donald Trump’s election will hasten the decline of the United States’ power in the world. Also in FT, Andrew Byrne reports on growing evidence that Moscow is nurturing ties to far-right extremists in Hungary.

In Quartz, Emma-Kate Symons explains why this weekend’s primary election in France may mean that two pro-Putin candidates will be contending for the presidency next year.

In the Washington Post’s “Monkey Cage” blog, Tim LaPira and Herschel Thomas argue that Donald Trump’s proposed lobbying ban will actually make lobbying worse.

The Miami Herald’s obituary of Fidel Castro by Glenn Garvin is a must-read. The Economist takes a look at what Castro’s death will mean for Cuba.

For the Guardian, Christian Davies reports on Polish Primie Minister Beata Szydlo’s plans for a new government department that could put pressure on independent NGOs.

In Politico Europe, Matthew Karnitschnig previews next week’s presidential election in Austria, which far-right Freedom Party candidate Norbert Hofer has a real chance of winning.

Bloomberg’s Stefan Nicola reports on how German Chancellor Angela Merkel is dealing with her own populist challenge.

Jay Rosen considers what political journalism got wrong in covering the U.S. election.

The Stanford History Education Group has produced a report that highlights how poorly American students fare at discerning what is true online.

In the photo, the first commercial flight from Miami in 50 years arrives in Havana, Cuba on November 28.

Photo credit: YAMIL LAGE/AFP/Getty Images

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