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If Countries Could Send Each Other Valentine’s Day Greetings …

Roses are red, violets are blue, we wrote these imaginary international greetings for you.

By , a global affairs journalist and the author of The Influence of Soros and Bad Jews.
valentine
valentine

Tuesday is Valentine’s Day. The holiday is not celebrated all around the world (and is in fact banned in some parts of it), but love between nations exists throughout the globe, even in these tense, trying times.

Here, then, are some Valentine’s greetings that various countries probably won’t send each other, but could.

 

Tuesday is Valentine’s Day. The holiday is not celebrated all around the world (and is in fact banned in some parts of it), but love between nations exists throughout the globe, even in these tense, trying times.

Here, then, are some Valentine’s greetings that various countries probably won’t send each other, but could.

 

From: Mexico

To: Canada

You’re my northern star,

My great white friend.

Let’s still have each other

If NAFTA ends?

 

From: Japan

To: China

You could be my boo.

Please stop sending your Coast Guard

By the Senkaku.

 

From: Gambia

To: West African regional leaders

Love means

That “sorry,” you never have to say.

Also,

Thanks for making our dictator go away.

 

From: The European Union

To: Germany, France, the Netherlands, and maybe Italy

We’re all Europeans,

All birds of a feather.

Those who have elections this year,

Let’s please keep it together.

 

From: Russia

To: The United States

Be mine.

Photo credit: TED ALJIBE/AFP/Getty Images

Emily Tamkin is a global affairs journalist and the author of The Influence of Soros and Bad Jews. Twitter: @emilyctamkin

Tag: Japan

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