The Cable

The Cable goes inside the foreign policy machine, from Foggy Bottom to Turtle Bay, the White House to Embassy Row.

Georgians Protest for Independent Media

A court case may have turned free media over to the government.

By , a global affairs journalist and the author of The Influence of Soros and Bad Jews.
rustavi
rustavi

Hundreds in Tbilisi, Georgia took to the streets two days in a row to protest what many perceive to be the government takeover of independent media.

Rustavi-2 is a popular television station in Georgia, and is known for publishing reports that are critical of the government -- indeed, for being “Georgia’s most important opposition voice.”

On Thursday, Georgia’s Supreme Court put the television station back in the hands of Kibar Khalvashi, its former co-owner who is widely thought to have government ties.

Hundreds in Tbilisi, Georgia took to the streets two days in a row to protest what many perceive to be the government takeover of independent media.

Rustavi-2 is a popular television station in Georgia, and is known for publishing reports that are critical of the government — indeed, for being “Georgia’s most important opposition voice.”

On Thursday, Georgia’s Supreme Court put the television station back in the hands of Kibar Khalvashi, its former co-owner who is widely thought to have government ties.

Khalvashi had sued to reclaim the station, saying that authorities under the previous Georgian government forced him to sell the station for too little. But members of Georgia’s opposition argued that the suit was but a ploy for Bidzina Ivanishvili to bring Rustavi-2 under his control.

Khalvashi is a close associate of Ivanishvili, who is the billionaire founder of Georgian Dream, the current ruling party. He served as prime minister for a year, but, at present, does not hold elected office. Nevertheless, he is believed by many to be the power behind the proverbial throne.

The government asked people to respect the ruling and vowed “respect towards the freedom of media.”

But critics, including the U.S. Embassy in Georgia and the OSCE’s representative for freedom of the media, expressed concern. Members of the opposition vowed to continue to fight for a free media.

Perhaps most significantly, hundreds of Georgian people in Tbilisi protested, first outside the Supreme Court and then outside Rustavi-2’s headquarters — in some cases spending the night — to try to use free speech and assembly to protect their country’s free media.

Photo credit: VANO SHLAMOV/AFP/Getty Images

Emily Tamkin is a global affairs journalist and the author of The Influence of Soros and Bad Jews. Twitter: @emilyctamkin

More from Foreign Policy

An illustration shows George Kennan, the father of Cold War containment strategy.
An illustration shows George Kennan, the father of Cold War containment strategy.

Is Cold War Inevitable?

A new biography of George Kennan, the father of containment, raises questions about whether the old Cold War—and the emerging one with China—could have been avoided.

U.S. President Joe Biden speaks on the DISCLOSE Act.
U.S. President Joe Biden speaks on the DISCLOSE Act.

So You Want to Buy an Ambassadorship

The United States is the only Western government that routinely rewards mega-donors with top diplomatic posts.

Chinese President Xi jinping  toasts the guests during a banquet marking the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China on September 30, 2019 in Beijing, China.
Chinese President Xi jinping toasts the guests during a banquet marking the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China on September 30, 2019 in Beijing, China.

Can China Pull Off Its Charm Offensive?

Why Beijing’s foreign-policy reset will—or won’t—work out.

Turkish Defense Minister Hulusi Akar chairs a meeting in Ankara, Turkey on Nov. 21, 2022.
Turkish Defense Minister Hulusi Akar chairs a meeting in Ankara, Turkey on Nov. 21, 2022.

Turkey’s Problem Isn’t Sweden. It’s the United States.

Erdogan has focused on Stockholm’s stance toward Kurdish exile groups, but Ankara’s real demand is the end of U.S. support for Kurds in Syria.