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Mapped: Countries Where Same-Sex Marriage Is Legal

The legalization of same-sex marriage is quickly spreading throughout the globe.

By , a freelance journalist and was a 2019-2020 Henry Luce Foundation Scholar at the Japan Times.
Same Sex Marriage Legalization-2

Beginning in the Netherlands in 2001, the legalization of same-sex marriage has snowballed throughout the world. Spain, Canada, and Argentina were next to pass the law in the early to mid 2000s; and at least two countries have legalized every single year since 2009. Taiwan passed the bill earlier this year, and Germany did just last week. Today, Malta took one step closer to joining the trend as parliament voted in favor of legalizing same-sex marriage. A final vote will be held on July 12.

Here’s a map to show you just how quickly and widespread the change has been — and which parts of the world haven’t changed at all.

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Beginning in the Netherlands in 2001, the legalization of same-sex marriage has snowballed throughout the world. Spain, Canada, and Argentina were next to pass the law in the early to mid 2000s; and at least two countries have legalized every single year since 2009. Taiwan passed the bill earlier this year, and Germany did just last week. Today, Malta took one step closer to joining the trend as parliament voted in favor of legalizing same-sex marriage. A final vote will be held on July 12.

Here’s a map to show you just how quickly and widespread the change has been — and which parts of the world haven’t changed at all.

Correction: This piece originally identified twenty-five countries, it has since been updated to include more.

Jesse Chase-Lubitz is a freelance journalist and was a 2019-2020 Henry Luce Foundation Scholar at the Japan Times. Twitter: @jesschaselubitz

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