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Diplomat of the Year Honoree Amina J. Mohammed Discusses Future of United Nations

The U.N.'s second-in-command talks the future of diplomacy.

Amina J. Mohammed gives a speech at FP's annual Diplomat of the Year Awards. (Jason Dixson Photography)
Amina J. Mohammed gives a speech at FP's annual Diplomat of the Year Awards. (Jason Dixson Photography)

For the last six years, Foreign Policy has identified the leaders, policymakers, and activists who have made the greatest contribution to international relations and honored them at our annual Diplomat of the Year Awards. For the first time in the event’s history, FP honored three outstanding women for their contributions in each field.

Our honoree for the titular award is Amina J. Mohammed, the UN’s Deputy Secretary-General, for her commitment to peace, sustainable development and gender equality.

In her career, first as Special Advisor to the former UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, then as Nigeria’s Minister of Environment, and now as Deputy Secretary-General, Mohammed has made a long list of critical contributions to issues ranging from development to the empowerment of women.

For the last six years, Foreign Policy has identified the leaders, policymakers, and activists who have made the greatest contribution to international relations and honored them at our annual Diplomat of the Year Awards. For the first time in the event’s history, FP honored three outstanding women for their contributions in each field.

Our honoree for the titular award is Amina J. Mohammed, the UN’s Deputy Secretary-General, for her commitment to peace, sustainable development and gender equality.
In her career, first as Special Advisor to the former UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, then as Nigeria’s Minister of Environment, and now as Deputy Secretary-General, Mohammed has made a long list of critical contributions to issues ranging from development to the empowerment of women.

In her speech, Amina touched on the work she’s accomplished across the globe, and the uncertainties that face diplomats in the years to come. Watch some highlights below.

[vimeo 242280689 w=800 h=420]

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