How Far is Too Far for Israel’s Targeted Killings?

Ronen Bergman discusses his new book, Rise and Kill First.

GAZA CITY, GAZA STRIP - MARCH 22: Thousands of Palestinians carry the coffin of Hamas Founder Sheikh Ahmed Yassin during his funeral on March 22, 2004 in Gaza City, Gaza Strip. Yassin was targeted and killed in an Israeli helicopter attack March 22, 2004 after leaving a mosque in the Gaza Strip. (Photo by Getty Images)
GAZA CITY, GAZA STRIP - MARCH 22: Thousands of Palestinians carry the coffin of Hamas Founder Sheikh Ahmed Yassin during his funeral on March 22, 2004 in Gaza City, Gaza Strip. Yassin was targeted and killed in an Israeli helicopter attack March 22, 2004 after leaving a mosque in the Gaza Strip. (Photo by Getty Images)
GAZA CITY, GAZA STRIP - MARCH 22: Thousands of Palestinians carry the coffin of Hamas Founder Sheikh Ahmed Yassin during his funeral on March 22, 2004 in Gaza City, Gaza Strip. Yassin was targeted and killed in an Israeli helicopter attack March 22, 2004 after leaving a mosque in the Gaza Strip. (Photo by Getty Images)

 

In his recently published book, Rise and Kill First, Ronen Bergman offer the first authoritative history of the special operations of Mossad, the Shin Bet, and the Israeli Defense Forces’ targeted assassinations. Berman’s book examines Israel’s legacy of “targeted killing operation.” Since the Second World War, has assassinated more people than any other country in the Western world — some 2,300.

Foreign Policy, which recently ran an excerpt of Bergman’s book, hosted Bergman in our Washington, D.C. studio to discuss Israel’s targeted killings, and whether the assassination campaign has been effective.

 

In his recently published book, Rise and Kill First, Ronen Bergman offer the first authoritative history of the special operations of Mossad, the Shin Bet, and the Israeli Defense Forces’ targeted assassinations. Berman’s book examines Israel’s legacy of “targeted killing operation.” Since the Second World War, has assassinated more people than any other country in the Western world — some 2,300.

Foreign Policy, which recently ran an excerpt of Bergman’s book, hosted Bergman in our Washington, D.C. studio to discuss Israel’s targeted killings, and whether the assassination campaign has been effective.

Ronen Bergman is the senior correspondent for military and intelligence affairs for Israel’s daily newspaper, Yedioth Ahronoth, and a contributing writer for The New York Times Magazine. Follow him on Twitter: @ronenbergman

Sasha Polakow-Suransky is FP’s deputy editor based in London. Follow him on Twitter: @sasha_p_s

Sharon Weinberger is FP’s executive editor for news. She is the author of The Imagineers of War: The Untold Story of DARPA, the Pentagon Agency That Changed the World. Follow her on Twitter at: @weinbergersa.

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