Podcast

The Untold Story of the Jerusalem Embassy Act of 1995

The weekly podcast: How a U.S. presidential candidate found common cause with Israelis opposed to the peace process to pass a law that could now doom it.

The Israeli flag flies in front of the Dome of the Rock in Jerusalem on Dec. 1, 2017. (Thomas Coex/AFP/Getty Images)
The Israeli flag flies in front of the Dome of the Rock in Jerusalem on Dec. 1, 2017. (Thomas Coex/AFP/Getty Images)

Bill Clinton didn’t want it, the Israeli prime minister was against it, and yet the U.S. Congress voted overwhelmingly 23 years ago to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. Successive presidents blocked the law’s implementation until this year, when Donald Trump decided to recognize Jerusalem as Israel’s capital. An interview with former U.S. Ambassador to Israel Martin Indyk.

Bill Clinton didn’t want it, the Israeli prime minister was against it, and yet the U.S. Congress voted overwhelmingly 23 years ago to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. Successive presidents blocked the law’s implementation until this year, when Donald Trump decided to recognize Jerusalem as Israel’s capital. An interview with former U.S. Ambassador to Israel Martin Indyk.

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