Wrong Place, Wrong Time

On the podcast: An American who was in Turkey during the coup attempt is accused of being one of the plotters.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan in Ankara, Turkey, on July 9. (Stringer/Getty Images)
Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan in Ankara, Turkey, on July 9. (Stringer/Getty Images)
Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan in Ankara, Turkey, on July 9. (Stringer/Getty Images)

For years, Turkey received praise for its open markets, elected government, and relative freedom of the press. But two years ago, a faction of the military attempted to stage a coup against President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. The attempt failed. Erdogan blamed the rebellion on followers of his former ally, the exiled cleric Fethullah Gulen. What followed was a purge of thousands of people from the government, the military, the media, and civil society. A constitutional referendum in 2017 further solidified Erdogan’s grip on power.

Henri Barkey, a Turkey scholar who worked in the State Department during Bill Clinton's presidency, joins us this week on the podcast. He was in Turkey on the night of the coup attempt, and after he returned to the United States, Turkish authorities accused him of being one of the coup plotters. He says the ordeal that followed has taken a toll on his personal life and career.

For years, Turkey received praise for its open markets, elected government, and relative freedom of the press. But two years ago, a faction of the military attempted to stage a coup against President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. The attempt failed. Erdogan blamed the rebellion on followers of his former ally, the exiled cleric Fethullah Gulen. What followed was a purge of thousands of people from the government, the military, the media, and civil society. A constitutional referendum in 2017 further solidified Erdogan’s grip on power.

Henri Barkey, a Turkey scholar who worked in the State Department during Bill Clinton’s presidency, joins us this week on the podcast. He was in Turkey on the night of the coup attempt, and after he returned to the United States, Turkish authorities accused him of being one of the coup plotters. He says the ordeal that followed has taken a toll on his personal life and career.

More from Foreign Policy

U.S. President Joe Biden listens to remarks in the Rose Garden at the White House in Washington on May 19.
U.S. President Joe Biden listens to remarks in the Rose Garden at the White House in Washington on May 19.

Russia’s Defeat Would Be America’s Problem

Victory in Ukraine could easily mean hubris in Washington.

Russian and Belarusian troops take part in joint military exercises.
Russian and Belarusian troops take part in joint military exercises.

Russia’s Stripped Its Western Borders to Feed the Fight in Ukraine

But Finland and the Baltic states are still leery of Moscow’s long-term designs.

Electricity pylons are shown under cloudy skies during rainfall near Romanel-sur-Lausanne, Switzerland, on Sept. 15.
Electricity pylons are shown under cloudy skies during rainfall near Romanel-sur-Lausanne, Switzerland, on Sept. 15.

Europe’s Energy Crisis Is Destroying the Multipolar World

The EU and Russia are losing their competitive edge. That leaves the United States and China to duke it out.

European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen announces new European Union energy policies at the bloc’s headquarters in Brussels, on Sept. 7.
European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen announces new European Union energy policies at the bloc’s headquarters in Brussels, on Sept. 7.

With Winter Coming, Europe Is Walking Off a Cliff

Europeans won’t escape their energy crisis as long as ideology trumps basic math.