Podcast

Inside China’s Re-education Camps

On the podcast: A Uighur journalist describes the plight of her relatives interned in Xinjiang. 

A demonstrator attends a protest to denounce China's treatment of ethnic Uighur Muslims in front of the Chinese consulate in Istanbul on July 5. (Ozan Kose/AFP/Getty Images)
A demonstrator attends a protest to denounce China's treatment of ethnic Uighur Muslims in front of the Chinese consulate in Istanbul on July 5. (Ozan Kose/AFP/Getty Images)

Last week, a bipartisan group of lawmakers in Washington introduced new legislation that would compel the Trump administration to punish China for its brutal crackdown on the Uighurs, a mostly Muslim group in the Chinese province of Xinjiang.

Chinese authorities have rounded up as many as 1 million Uighurs, as well as ethnic Kazakhs, Kyrgyz, and other Muslims, and interned them in what authorities call “re-education camps.” Those living outside the camps in Xinjiang are subject to round-the-clock surveillance in conditions akin to those of a police state.

Gulchehra Hoja, a Uighur journalist with Radio Free Asia, joins us on the podcast this week. Almost two dozen members of her family have been detained by Chinese authorities.

Last week, a bipartisan group of lawmakers in Washington introduced new legislation that would compel the Trump administration to punish China for its brutal crackdown on the Uighurs, a mostly Muslim group in the Chinese province of Xinjiang.

Chinese authorities have rounded up as many as 1 million Uighurs, as well as ethnic Kazakhs, Kyrgyz, and other Muslims, and interned them in what authorities call “re-education camps.” Those living outside the camps in Xinjiang are subject to round-the-clock surveillance in conditions akin to those of a police state.

Gulchehra Hoja, a Uighur journalist with Radio Free Asia, joins us on the podcast this week. Almost two dozen members of her family have been detained by Chinese authorities.

Tag: China

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