The China Syndrome

On the podcast: A former CIA analyst on Beijing’s interference in the affairs of other countries.

By , the executive editor for podcasts at Foreign Policy.
(Toshifumi Kitamura/AFP/Getty Images)
(Toshifumi Kitamura/AFP/Getty Images)
(Toshifumi Kitamura/AFP/Getty Images)

As China’s global power grows, so do concerns about interference by the Chinese Communist Party in the internal matters of the United States and other Western democracies.

On the podcast: Former CIA analyst Peter Mattis has been tracking China’s interference efforts for years, including threats on its own citizens abroad, the targeting of critics, and the wooing of businessmen. Mattis breaks down how Chinese interference efforts actually work, what distinguishes them from standard lobbying and persuasion campaigns run by other countries, and how vulnerable the United States may be as the 2020 presidential campaign gets underway.

As China’s global power grows, so do concerns about interference by the Chinese Communist Party in the internal matters of the United States and other Western democracies.

On the podcast: Former CIA analyst Peter Mattis has been tracking China’s interference efforts for years, including threats on its own citizens abroad, the targeting of critics, and the wooing of businessmen. Mattis breaks down how Chinese interference efforts actually work, what distinguishes them from standard lobbying and persuasion campaigns run by other countries, and how vulnerable the United States may be as the 2020 presidential campaign gets underway.

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