Climate Change Prophet

On the podcast: A scientist who is also an evangelical Christian wants conservatives to understand the dangers of climate change.

By , the executive editor for podcasts at Foreign Policy.
Climate scientist Katharine Hayhoe speaks at Hardin-Simmons University in Abilene, Texas, on April 3, 2012. (Nellie Doneva/Abilene Reporter-News via AP)
Climate scientist Katharine Hayhoe speaks at Hardin-Simmons University in Abilene, Texas, on April 3, 2012. (Nellie Doneva/Abilene Reporter-News via AP)
Climate scientist Katharine Hayhoe speaks at Hardin-Simmons University in Abilene, Texas, on April 3, 2012. (Nellie Doneva/Abilene Reporter-News via AP)

Climate change is one of the most politically divisive issues in the United States today: Most liberals embrace the scientific view that it's a largely man-made phenomenon threatening our very existence, whereas many conservatives see it as fake news.

Climate change is one of the most politically divisive issues in the United States today: Most liberals embrace the scientific view that it’s a largely man-made phenomenon threatening our very existence, whereas many conservatives see it as fake news.

Standing at the intersection between these two groups is Katharine Hayhoe, an evangelical Christian who is also an atmospheric scientist. Hayhoe, who runs the Climate Science Center at Texas Tech University, has devoted herself to persuading skeptics that climate change is real—including people in her own community.

Hayhoe is featured in the Winter 2019 edition of Foreign Policy magazine as one of 100 Global Thinkers. She is also the guest on our podcast this week.

 

 

 

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