Paellas for the People

On the podcast: How chef José Andrés feeds the needy around the world.

By , the executive editor for news and podcasts at Foreign Policy.
The chef José Andrés stirs paella in a giant pan during the #ChefsForPuertoRico relief operation in San Juan, Puerto Rico, in October 2017.
The chef José Andrés stirs paella in a giant pan during the #ChefsForPuertoRico relief operation in San Juan, Puerto Rico, in October 2017.
The chef José Andrés stirs paella in a giant pan during the #ChefsForPuertoRico relief operation in San Juan, Puerto Rico, in October 2017. World Central Kitchen

The Spanish-American chef José Andrés is mostly known for his high-end restaurants, including one in Washington, D.C., that serves just 12 diners at a time.

But Andrés is also the founder of World Central Kitchen, a nonprofit organization that distributes food to needy people around the world. While the Federal Emergency Management Agency was bungling the recovery effort in Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria in 2017, Andrés's team of chefs and locals served millions of meals. He later got into a Twitter spat with President Donald Trump over the casualty toll in Puerto Rico. This year, he showed up at Trump's State of the Union address in a T-shirt emblazoned with the words "Immigrants Feed America."

Andrés is our guest on the podcast this week.

The Spanish-American chef José Andrés is mostly known for his high-end restaurants, including one in Washington, D.C., that serves just 12 diners at a time.

But Andrés is also the founder of World Central Kitchen, a nonprofit organization that distributes food to needy people around the world. While the Federal Emergency Management Agency was bungling the recovery effort in Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria in 2017, Andrés’s team of chefs and locals served millions of meals. He later got into a Twitter spat with President Donald Trump over the casualty toll in Puerto Rico. This year, he showed up at Trump’s State of the Union address in a T-shirt emblazoned with the words “Immigrants Feed America.”

Andrés is our guest on the podcast this week.

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