Podcast

Inside the Battle to Decriminalize Homosexuality in India

On the podcast: A human rights lawyer describes the 10-year fight for LGBT rights.

By , the executive editor for news and podcasts at Foreign Policy.
People celebrate in Bangalore on Sept. 6, 2018, after India’s top court struck down a colonial-era law that penalized gay sex. (Aijaz Rahi/AP)
People celebrate in Bangalore on Sept. 6, 2018, after India’s top court struck down a colonial-era law that penalized gay sex. (Aijaz Rahi/AP)

In scores of countries around the world—mostly in the Middle East, South Asia, and Africa—homosexuality remains a criminal offense. In a handful of those countries, it is punishable by death.

On the podcast this week, the human rights attorney Menaka Guruswamy describes the fight to overturn a colonial-era law in India that criminalized LGBT lives and relationships. Guruswamy was one of the lawyers who argued the landmark case in India’s Supreme Court last year.

In scores of countries around the world—mostly in the Middle East, South Asia, and Africa—homosexuality remains a criminal offense. In a handful of those countries, it is punishable by death.

On the podcast this week, the human rights attorney Menaka Guruswamy describes the fight to overturn a colonial-era law in India that criminalized LGBT lives and relationships. Guruswamy was one of the lawyers who argued the landmark case in India’s Supreme Court last year.

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