Podcast

China’s War on Uighurs

On the podcast: A Uighur journalist in exile tells her family’s story.

By , the executive editor for news and podcasts at Foreign Policy.
A guard watchtower rises above a perimeter fence of what is officially known as a "vocational skills education center" for Uighur Muslims in Dabancheng in Xinjiang, China, on Sept. 4, 2018. (Thomas Peter/Reuters)
A guard watchtower rises above a perimeter fence of what is officially known as a "vocational skills education center" for Uighur Muslims in Dabancheng in Xinjiang, China, on Sept. 4, 2018. (Thomas Peter/Reuters)

In China's semi-autonomous region of Xinjiang, authorities have locked up an estimated 1 million Uighur Muslims in internment camps. They have demolished mosques, banned the Uighur language from schools, and even used DNA to monitor the population. China says the crackdown is in response to the separatist movement in Xinjiang, but the Uighurs call it cultural genocide.

On the podcast this week, we talk to Zulhumar Isaac, a Uighur journalist living in exile in Sweden, cut off from her family and friends at home.

 

In China’s semi-autonomous region of Xinjiang, authorities have locked up an estimated 1 million Uighur Muslims in internment camps. They have demolished mosques, banned the Uighur language from schools, and even used DNA to monitor the population. China says the crackdown is in response to the separatist movement in Xinjiang, but the Uighurs call it cultural genocide.

On the podcast this week, we talk to Zulhumar Isaac, a Uighur journalist living in exile in Sweden, cut off from her family and friends at home.

 

Tag: China

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