Podcast

Toward a More Feminist Foreign Policy

On the podcast: Swedish Foreign Minister Margot Wallstrom on how to give women a voice in an arena dominated by men.

By , the executive editor for news and podcasts at Foreign Policy.
Swedish Foreign Minister Margot Wallstrom speaks during a news conference in Berlin on April 10, 2018. (Wolfgang Kumm/Picture Alliance via Getty Images)
Swedish Foreign Minister Margot Wallstrom speaks during a news conference in Berlin on April 10, 2018. (Wolfgang Kumm/Picture Alliance via Getty Images)

This week, as the world marks International Women’s Day, we host on the podcast Swedish Foreign Minister Margot Wallstrom. In 2014, Wallstrom forged what she described as a “feminist foreign policy” for Sweden—an approach meant to guarantee a greater say for women in an arena that has traditionally been dominated by men.

The strategy drew some criticism but has since been used as a model in France, Australia, Canada, and other countries. “I used to quote Gandhi, who said, ‘First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, and then you win,’” Wallstrom says.

This week, as the world marks International Women’s Day, we host on the podcast Swedish Foreign Minister Margot Wallstrom. In 2014, Wallstrom forged what she described as a “feminist foreign policy” for Sweden—an approach meant to guarantee a greater say for women in an arena that has traditionally been dominated by men.

The strategy drew some criticism but has since been used as a model in France, Australia, Canada, and other countries. “I used to quote Gandhi, who said, ‘First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, and then you win,’” Wallstrom says.

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