April 2019

Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaidó, recognized by many countries including the United States as the country's rightful interim ruler, stands on top of a car surrounded by soldiers and civilians at Plaza Altamira in Caracas, Venezuela, on April 30.

Guaidó Is Stumbling Toward a Coup

Naunihal Singh, an expert on military takeovers, addresses what to watch as Venezuela's would-be president attempts to oust Maduro.

A screen grab from a propaganda video released April 29 purportedly shows Islamic State leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi for the first time in five years at an undisclosed location.

‘Let’s Kill This Baby in the Crib’

That’s what the CIA said when it had Osama bin Laden in its sights after 9/11. Instead, America veered off into Iraq, and the result is Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, who appeared in a new video this week.

Forces loyal to President Nicolás Maduro confront supporters of Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaidó in Caracas on April 30.

Guaidó’s Make or Break Moment

Calling for the final phase of the revolution was the Venezuelan opposition leader’s boldest move yet, and the outcome will show whether his protest still has legs.

Activists of the Pashtun Protection Movement protest against the arrest of their activists and leaders in Karachi on Feb. 10.

The Pakistani Military’s Worst Nightmare Is Coming True

A human rights movement from Waziristan is finally bringing the country together to challenge the brass.

Juan Guaidó talks to media outside La Carlota Air Base in Caracas on April 30.

Juan Guaidó Calls Venezuelans to the Streets

A transcript of the opposition leader’s remarks from La Carlota Air Base.

EU Trade Commissioner Cecilia Malmström speaks about EU-U.S. trade talks in Brussels on April 15.

‘We Are Not Negotiating With a Gun to Our Head’

EU Trade Commissioner Cecilia Malmström says Washington must remove tariffs or no trade deal.

Richard Holbrooke talks with Senate Foreign Relations Committee ranking member Sen. Richard Lugar before a hearing on Capitol Hill July 14, 2010 in Washington.

Bipartisan Foreign Policy Died This Weekend

Richard Lugar represented an endangered aspect of American—and Republican Party—leadership.

Instructions are posted in window of the headquarters of the Norwegian aluminum group Norsk Hydro, following a cyberattack, in Oslo on March 19.

Can Courts Clear the Fog of War?

As online attacks blur the lines, the future may be perpetual conflict.

Members of Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps march during the annual military parade marking the anniversary of the start of the Iran-Iraq War in Tehran on Sept. 22, 2018.

Iran’s Changing of the Guards

The IRGC just selected a new leader. Here’s why—and what it means for Iranian strategy.

A customer looks at an Iranian-made washing machine at a store in the Iraqi capital, Baghdad, on Aug. 8, 2018.

Don’t Let Iraq Fall Victim to U.S.-Iran Rivalry

Baghdad must insulate itself from the fallout by weaning itself from exclusive dependence on two outside backers.

Performers dressed as trees and hunters stage a demonstration against video piracy in Berlin on Sept. 3, 2008. The placard reads: "Copyright pirates can't hide, not even on the internet."

Can the EU Save the Internet?

Europe’s new rules put creators and consumers back in the driving seat.

People line up to wash their hands with chlorinated water designed to prevent the spread of Ebola at a symbolic polling station in Beni, Democratic Republic of the Congo, on Dec. 30, 2018.

Cliches Can Kill in Congo

The country’s Ebola outbreak is spreading out of control—but it's not because of a fight over "conflict minerals."

Sen. Richard Lugar speaks with reporters outside the Senate chamber in Washington on Dec. 15, 2010.

Nunn on Lugar: The Nation Needs Him More Than Ever

Richard Lugar’s legacy could come undone as the world enters a nuclear hair-trigger period, his former Senate partner warns.

The House Budget Committee displays copies of U.S. President Donald Trump's fiscal 2020 budget in the Cannon House Office Building on Capitol Hill in Washington on March 11.

U.S. Defense Department’s Top Budget Strategist to Step Down

The departure adds more uncertainty at the Pentagon, where Trump has yet to appoint a permanent secretary of defense.

Turkish liras are seen in Istanbul on Nov. 21, 2017.

Erdogan Is Writing Checks the Turkish Economy Can’t Cash

The president’s stimulus programs may help him stay in power, but they will cost his country in the long run.

U.S. President Donald Trump looks at Russia's President Vladimir Putin as they take their places for a group photo during the G-20 Leaders' Summit in Buenos Aires on Nov. 30, 2018.

Trump May Like Putin. His Administration Doesn’t.

How the U.S. president’s Russia rapprochement never came to pass.

A member of the Iraqi forces walks past a mural bearing the logo of the Islamic State on March 1, 2017, in the village of Albu Sayf, on the southern outskirts of Mosul.

The Post-Caliphate Caliph

A new video by the leader of the Islamic State proves he is committed to fighting the long fight.

Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan (R) and leader of the Nationalist Movement Party (MHP) Devlet Bahceli talk on stage during a rally in advance of local elections in Ankara on March 23.

In Turkey, Erdogan Is Still Calling All the Shots

The president’s coalition partners aren’t pulling him to the right. They’re doing his bidding.

Personnel in the South Sudan People's Defence Forces, formerly named the Sudan People's Liberation Army, take part in a drill at their barracks south of Juba, South Sudan, on April 26. (Alex McBride/AFP/Getty Images)

Former U.S. Diplomats Lobby to Stop South Sudan War Crimes Court

The move sparked anger among experts, who see the court as critical to peace.

Abdelkhaleq Jouloud sits with his family in their tent at a camp for displaced people in Hammam al-Alil, south of the northern Iraqi city of Mosul, on Nov. 12, 2018.

Among Displaced Iraqis, One Group Is Worse Off Than the Rest

Internal refugees with perceived ties to the Islamic State suffer abuse and sexual exploitation in camps.

A man is reflected walking outside Los Angeles City Hall on April 25.

City Hall Is the Best Prep for the White House

With cities leading global initiatives, the path from mayor to president makes sense.

Pete Buttigieg reacts as he sees an overflow crowd waiting for him at a meet-and-greet at Madhouse Coffee on April 8, 2019 in Las Vegas, Nevada.

The 9/11 Generation Served. Now It Wants to Lead.

Three Democrats running for the White House fought in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan—and they came back with very different ideas.

Candidate from Spanish far-right party Vox, Santiago Abascal, waves to supporters during a campaign rally in Seville on April 24 ahead of the April 28 general election. (Cristina Quicler/AFP/Getty Images)

Make Spain Great Again

The far-right Vox party has adopted Trump-style politics.

Santiago Abascal, the leader of the far-right party Vox arrives to a rally at Palacios de Congresos on Apr. 17 in Granada, Spain.

Spain’s Vox Party Hates Muslims—Except the Ones Who Fund It

The upstart far-right party is unapologetically Islamophobic, but without donations from Iranian exiles, it may have never gotten off the ground.

A migrant rides a bike past greenhouses in El Ejido, Spain, on Jan. 14.

Inside Spain’s Electoral Hothouse

The country’s agricultural heartland prepares for a possible Vox victory.

Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin watches an air show in Zhukovsky, outside Moscow, on Aug. 17, 2011.

Spooks in the Kremlin

The dangers of Putin’s unhealthy reliance on Russian intelligence.

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The Oldest Game

The very long history of industrial espionage.

The Fialka encryption system, part of the collection at the KGB Espionage Museum in New York City.

The Soviets’ Unbreakable Code

The hidden history of the Fialka espionage machine.

Illustration by Delcan & Company for Foreign Policy

The Spycraft Revolution

Changes in technology, politics, and business are all transforming espionage. Intelligence agencies must adapt—or risk irrelevance.

Eiko Ojala illustration for Foreign Policy

The Spies Who Came In From the Continent

How Brexit could spell the end of Britain’s famed advantage in intelligence.

A police officer guards the area near Dawatagaha Jumma Masjid ahead of Friday prayers in Colombo, Sri Lanka, on April 26.

The World This Weekend

Sri Lanka deals with the aftermath of the Easter Sunday attacks.

Eiko Ojala illustration for Foreign Policy

The Manufacturer’s Dilemma

To secure itself, the West needs to figure out where all its gadgets are coming from. Here’s why that’s so difficult.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo delivers remarks during a welcome ceremony in the lobby of the State Department in Washington on May 1, 2018.

On His 1-Year Anniversary, Pompeo Boasts of Success

Despite budget cuts and no major achievements, the secretary of state tells employees he’s restoring the prestige of U.S. diplomacy.

A demonstrator blocks the path of a tank convoy near Tiananmen Square in Beijing in 1989. (Bettmann Archive/Getty Images)

Thirty Years After Tiananmen Square

On the podcast: A look back at the student protests that changed China’s trajectory.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo speaks during a press conference at the State Department in Washington on April 22.

Maximum Pressure on Iran Won’t Work

Trump’s new Iran sanctions will hurt the United States in the long term.

An Indian police commando stands guard in front of the Taj Mahal Palace hotel in Mumbai on November 25, 2010, ahead of the second anniversary of the November 26, 2008 Mumbai attacks. (Punit Paranjpe/AFP/Getty Images)

India’s Not as Safe as You Think It Is

Hotel Mumbai is a tale of courage. It is also a worrying reminder of India’s security flaws.

Police officers patrol the area around Dewatagaha Jumma Masjid in Colombo, Sri Lanka, ahead of Friday prayers on April 26.

Sri Lanka Is Already Drawing the Wrong Lessons From the Attacks

Responding to the recent violence with typical policies to counter violent extremism could make things far worse.

Britain's Chancellor of the Exchequer Philip Hammond meets with China's Vice Premier Hu Chunhua ahead of the big Belt and Road summit in Beijing on Apr. 25.

China Gets a British Bedfellow

Left vulnerable by Brexit, the U.K. looks eager to sign onto Beijing’s giant Belt and Road program.

Donald Trump speaks at the NRA-ILA's Leadership Forum at the 146th NRA Annual Meetings & Exhibits on April 28, 2017 in Atlanta, Georgia.

Loving Dictators Is as American as Apple Pie

Trump has embraced yet another strongman, this time in Libya. But it’s not just a personal failing—it’s a national tradition.

Russian President Vladimir Putin welcomes North Korean leader Kim Jong Un prior to their talks at the Far Eastern Federal University campus on Russky Island in Vladivostok, Russia, on April 25.

What Putin Said to Kim

A transcript of Russian President Vladimir Putin’s remarks about his summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

Sarah Elizabeth Robles of the United States competes during a weightlifting competition at the 2016 Olympic Games at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

America Isn’t as Powerful as It Thinks It Is

The era of unilateralism is over—and Washington is the last to realize it.

A man takes photo of a sign promoting the Belt and Road Forum in Beijing on April 22.

China’s Debt Diplomacy

How Belt and Road threatens countries’ ability to achieve self-reliance.

A protester sits on a window of the Venezuelan Embassy in Washington on April 25.

Like Venezuela’s Presidency, D.C. Embassy Is in Limbo

Left-wing protesters occupy the Venezuelan Embassy in Washington while the Secret Service looks on.

Franz Kafka and the Kafkaesque Robert Mueller.

Kafka Would Impeach Trump

Everything about the Mueller report is ambiguous—except its ultimate moral meaning.

Sri Lankan security forces secure the area around St. Anthony’s Shrine in Colombo on April 21.

Sri Lanka’s Christians and Muslims Weren’t Enemies

The country’s real divide has been between Buddhists and Muslims, but the Easter attacks may change all that.

GM workers hold a rally outside the plant in Lordstown, Ohio, which after producing cars for 50 years is now closed, on March 6.

‘The Next Backlash Is Going to Be Against Technology’

Harvard economist Dani Rodrik on how to make globalization fair and sustainable.

Vice President Joe Biden speaks at a campaign rally for Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton in Scranton, Pennsylvania, on Aug. 15, 2016.

How Biden’s Greatest Strength Could Prove a Weakness

No one can touch him on foreign-policy experience, especially Trump. But his long voting record will also be a vulnerability, starting with Iraq.

Adam Woroniec, a retired geography and history teacher, in the gym of the school where he once worked on April 12.

Zombie Movies, Disaster Tourism, and Broken Lives

Thirty-three years after the Chernobyl meltdown, parts of the contaminated zone have become attractions. In others, a harsher reality persists.

A coalition airstrike in the western Daraiya neighborhood of the embattled northern Syrian city of Raqqa on Sept. 5, 2017.

How the U.S. Miscounted the Dead in Syria

Rights groups say U.S.-led coalition killed many more civilians than previously disclosed in the battle against the Islamic State.

Two paramilitary police officers secure an area along a street during the Belt and Road Forum in Beijing on April 25.

FP’s Guide to China’s Belt and Road

The best pieces to read as leaders meet in Beijing.

Ivanka Trump visits a cocoa cooperative in Ivory Coast during the Women Entrepreneurs Finance Initiative (We-Fi) West Africa Regional Summit in Abidjan on Apr. 17.

The White House Won’t Empower Women. Sudan’s Protests Will.

From Khartoum to Warsaw, demonstrators are demanding basic equality while the Trump administration wages a war on women’s rights.

A Libyan woman hits a photo of strongman Khalifa Haftar with her shoe during a demonstration in Tripoli on April 19.

Trump’s Support for Haftar Won’t Help Libya

The United States should be working to help negotiate peace rather than fanning the flames of another failed war. 

Forces loyal to the internationally recognized Libyan Government of National Accord drive through Tripoli’s old international airport on April 8. (Mahmud Turkia/AFP/Getty Images)

Who Controls Libya’s Airports Controls Libya

The battle for control over critical infrastructure shows who might win the civil war.

Volodymyr Zelensky celebrates after the announcement of the first exit poll results in the second round of Ukraine’s presidential election at his campaign headquarters in Kiev on April 21.

How a Jew Won Over the Land of the Cossacks

Under threat from Russia, national identity in Ukraine has overpowered religious and ethnic differences.

Prime Minister Theresa May at a plant machinery manufacturing firm on June 1, 2017 in Guisborough, United Kingdom.

Britain Can’t Afford to Keep Talking About Brexit

The never-ending conversation about leaving the EU has stalled all other progress on economic policy.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg arrives to testify before a joint hearing of the US Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee and Senate Judiciary Committee on April 10, 2018 in Washington, DC.

Disinformation Is Drowning Democracy

In the new age of lies, law, not tech, is the answer.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and President Trump share a laugh during a cabinet meeting with U.S. President Donald Trump in the Cabinet Room of the White House, July 18, 2018 in Washington.

By Punishing Iran, Trump Is Weakening America

Washington’s extraordinary unilateralism is cracking the foundation of its global financial power.

Visitors stand together at Tsitsernakaberd, the Armenian genocide memorial complex, in Yerevan, Armenia, on Nov. 16, 2018.

Israel’s Refusal to Recognize the Armenian Genocide Is Indefensible

Both Armenians and Jews have been the victims of premeditated mass murder. The Israeli government must put justice before political expediency and call the crime by its name.

A Sri Lankan woman cries during a burial service for a bomb blast victim in a cemetery in Colombo on April 23, two days after a series of bomb attacks targeting churches and luxury hotels in Sri Lanka.

The Islamic State’s New Afterlife

Sunday’s attack in Sri Lanka is just the latest evidence of the group’s persistent influence.

A statue is pictured next to shrapnel marks at St. Sebastian's Church in Negombo on April 22, a day after the building was hit as part of a series of bomb blasts targeting churches and luxury hotels in Sri Lanka.

Sri Lanka Attack ‘Is the Wave of the Future’

Returning Islamic State fighters are spreading “a really viral ideology” and looking for vulnerable countries to target, says terrorism expert Anne Speckhard.

A child looks at a grave after a funeral for victims of the Easter Sunday attacks in Katuwapity village on April 23, 2019 in Negambo, Sri Lanka.

Sri Lanka’s Perfect Storm of Failure

There were many chances to stop the Easter Sunday attacks. The government missed them all.

From left, People’s Party leader Pablo Casado, Spain’s Prime Minister and Socialist Party leader Pedro Sánchez, Ciudadanos party leader Albert Rivera, and Podemos party leader Pablo Iglesias attend a debate in Madrid on April 22 as candidates for Spain’s general elections. (Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images)

Spain’s Political Deadlock Is Forever

The country’s snap election on April 28, its third in five years, may just be the prelude to another down the line.

U.S. President Donald Trump chairs a United Nations Security Council meeting in New York City on Sept. 26, 2018. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

How a U.N. Bid to Prevent Sexual Violence Turned Into a Spat Over Abortion

In an internal document, Trump officials threatened to reject an anti-rape measure over language on sexual and reproductive health.

A man poses with replica prints of the demonetized 500- and 1,000-rupee notes in Mumbai on Nov. 20, 2016.

India’s $7 Billion Election

How the vote got so expensive, and what it says about the country’s democracy.

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This Banking Fraud Shows How Shady China’s Economy Remains

Beijing promises reforms, but won't take the steps that really matter.

Members of Brazil’s armed forces patrol the favelas of Chapéu Mangueira and Babilônia in Rio de Janeiro on June 21, 2018.

Brazil’s Murder Rate Finally Fell—and by a Lot

Bolsonaro will claim credit for the good news, but his policies may erase the country’s hard-won gains.

US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo (R) listens while Japan's Foreign Minister Taro Kono speaks during a press conference after 2+2 meeting at the US Department of State April 19, 2019, in Washington, DC.

Japan Pushes the Speed Limit on Trade Talks

Tokyo wants to swerve past Trumpian pitfalls—and get a deal done.

The Ukrainian actor and comedian Volodymyr Zelensky on set in Kiev, Ukraine, during filming of  “Servant of the People” on Feb. 6.

Who’s Laughing Now: Zelensky or Putin?

Ukraine’s incoming comedian president has sent mixed signals on Russia. But the Kremlin may not sit still while he figures out a policy.

An Iranian laborer walks on the platform of the oil facility on Kharg Island off the coast of Iran.

Trump’s Big Iran Oil Gamble

By seeking to cut Iranian exports to zero, the U.S. president is taking a major economic and political risk.

Teenage girls pose behind a pretend car in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, on June 22, 2018.

Riyadh May Have Unleashed More Change Than It Can Handle

In the wake of social and economic reforms, some Saudis are speaking out.

Volodymyr Zelensky celebrates after the announcement of the first exit poll results in the second round of Ukraine’s presidential election at his campaign headquarters in Kiev on April 21.

Ukraine’s Pretend President Now Faces a Real Test

In his fight against corruption, Zelensky will face real challenges—not least from his own constituents.

Organization of American States Secretary-General Luis Almagro (left) listens while Ecuadorian President Lenín Moreno speaks at the OAS in Washington on April 17. (Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images)

For Ecuador’s Lenín Moreno, Evicting Julian Assange Is Only the Beginning

The Ecuadorian president is seeking to broadly reverse Rafael Correa’s legacy.

Banners hang along a street ahead of the Belt and Road Forum in Beijing on April 22, 2019. (Photo by WANG ZHAO / AFP)        (Photo credit should read WANG ZHAO/AFP/Getty Images)

Can China Deliver a Better Belt and Road?

Beijing promises greener and fairer projects, but it has to keep its promises at home as well.

Sri Lankan officials inspect St. Sebastian's Church in Negombo, north of Colombo, after multiple explosions targeting churches and hotels on April 21.

What’s Behind the Terrorist Attacks in Sri Lanka?

Coordinated blasts recall the island country’s violent past.

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Books in Brief

Recent releases on Richard Holbrooke, America’s hidden empire, and the untold story of Chernobyl.

Russian President Vladimir Putin meets with his Turkish counterpart Recep Tayyip Erdogan in the Black Sea resort of Sochi on Feb. 14.

Russia Has Won the Information War in Turkey

The Kremlin doesn’t even need fake news to push its agenda on Turkish social media. Because domestic disinformation is rampant, Moscow has managed to infect both sides of the debate.

Former Malian Prime Minister Soumeylou Boubeye Maiga (2L) is received in Mopti on his visit to Mali's central region on October 14, 2018. (Photo by Michele Cattani/ AFP/Getty Images)

Dumping One Government Won’t Fix Mali

March’s deadly massacre exposed the lack of progress since the country’s peace accords—and the many political and security reforms that are needed.

Chinese workers construct a shopping mall at a retail and office complex, part of 
a Chinese-backed building boom in Colombo, Sri Lanka, in November 2018. (Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)

Catching China by the Belt (and Road)

How Washington can beat Beijing’s global influence campaign.

Indonesian workers transport ballot boxes for the upcoming general elections at the Bonto Matinggi village in Maros, South Sulawesi, on April 16. (Daeng Mansur/AFP/Getty Images)

The World This Weekend

In recent days, Washington raced to decipher the Mueller report and Indonesian voters cast ballots at more than 800,000 polling stations.

French Prime Minister Edouard Philippe, and French President Emmanuel Macron near the entrance of the Notre-Dame de Paris Cathedral in Paris, as flames engulf its roof on April 15, 2019. (Philippe Wojazer/AFP/Getty Images)

Notre Dame Is Setting Macron’s Agenda Ablaze

A national catastrophe is ruining the French president’s plans for a revival.

Actress Shefali Shah in “Delhi Crime.” (Golden Karavan/Netflix)

Delhi Crime and Punishment

Netflix’s hit show Delhi Crime documents the changes rocking Indian society—and not all of them are good.

Russian President Vladimir Putin gives a joint press conference with his Turkish counterpart at the Kremlin in Moscow on April 8. (Alexander Nemenov/AFP/Getty Images)

With Trump’s Talks Faltering, Putin Wants In on the North Korea Game

Meeting Kim Jong Un may be the Russian leader’s latest effort to undermine the Americans.

Document of the Week: Jared Kushner’s Mideast Peace Email

“Our goal can’t be to keep things stable and as they are, our goal had to be to make things significantly BETTER!”

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What the Mueller Report Tells Us About Russia’s Designs on 2020

Political chaos in Washington is what Moscow was hoping for all along, U.S. intelligence officials say. And the Kremlin would like to create more of it.

A woman mourns over a relative's grave at the Srebrenica-Potocari Memorial and Cemetery on Nov. 22, 2017. (Dimitar Dilkoff/AFP/Getty Images)

The Butcher of Bosnia on Trial

On the podcast: A film on the war in Bosnia probes the psychology of genocide and justice.

U.S. President Donald Trump (L) speaks  as Foxconn CEO Terry Gou (C) and U.S. House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-WI) watch at the groundbreaking for a Foxconn plant on June 28, 2018 in Mt Pleasant, Wisconsin.  (Photo by Andy Manis/Getty Images)

The Billionaire and the Mayor Disrupting Taiwan’s Elections

Star politician Han Kuo-yu or Foxconn leader Terry Gou could lead the country — if they can convince people they don't work for China.

Donald Trump meets Vladimir Putin at the opening of the G20 summit on July 7, 2017 in Hamburg, Germany. (Steffen Kugler/BPA via Getty Images)

Mueller’s Bombshells Are About Putin, Not Trump

The special counsel’s report reveals a disorganized government with unclear lines of authority—and not just in Washington.

People protesting against a new government measure to further restrict abortions in Poland gather as part of "Black Friday" demonstrations nationwide on March 23, 2018 in Poznan, Poland. The women's rights group Dziewuchy Dziewuchom, called on women across Poland to gather for protests in cities nationwide.

Politics Without Parties

From Poland to Iceland, citizens’ groups are taking matters into their own hands and bringing about genuine political change from outside the party system.

Gérard Araud, the French ambassador to the United Nations, attends a U.N. Security Council meeting at U.N. headquarters in New York on June 9, 2010. (Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images)

How Trump Practices ‘Escalation Dominance’

“You have restraint on your side. He has no restraint. So you lose,” says outgoing French Ambassador Gérard Araud.

Then-FBI Director Robert Mueller testifies during a hearing before the House Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington on June 13, 2013. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

‘The Biggest Piece Mueller Left Out’

“The money trail is the most important part of the unanswered questions," says former U.S. Ambassador to Russia Michael McFaul.

A musician wearing a Soviet militia uniform stands before the entrance of the Ilkhom Theatre in Tashkent, Uzbekistan, on March 13.

Tashkent Underground

The Ilkhom Theatre Company has kept freedom alive in Uzbekistan since before the fall of the Soviet Union.

Supporters of Yemen's Houthi rebels attend a rally  in Sanaa, Yemen, on March 26. (Mohammed Huwais/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump’s Yemen Veto Could Still Cost Saudis

Democratic lawmaker mulls sanctioning Saudis tied to the humanitarian blockade on the war-torn country.

Rohingya refugees shout slogans at a protest against a disputed repatriation program at the Unchiprang refugee camp near Teknaf on Nov. 15, 2018. (Dibyangshu Sarkar/AFP/Getty Images)

U.N. Bureaucrats Just Want the Rohingya Off Their Plate

Dumping refugees on a doomed island in Bangladesh is as callous as it is predictable.

Ukrainian presidential candidate Volodymyr Zelensky enters a hall in Kiev on March 6, 2019. (Sergei Supinsky/AFP/Getty Images)

Putin Should Fear Ukraine’s Russia-Friendly Front-Runner

The Kremlin will soon wish it were still dealing with a Ukrainian president who so much resembled its own.

A supporter of the Bharatiya Janata Party wears a mask of Prime Minister Narendra Modi at one of Modi’s political campaign events ahead of India's general election in Gohpur on March 30. (Biju Boro/AFP/Getty Images)

FP’s Guide to the Indian Elections

Will voters give Narendra Modi another chance?

French Economy Minister Bruno Le Maire, left, with his German counterpart, Peter Altmaier, discuss European Union industrial policy on Feb. 19. (John MacDougall/AFP/Getty Images)

Fearing Populism, France and Germany Flee Into the Past

Europe’s top economies are trying to take on China and the United States by resurrecting industrial policy. Brussels is not happy.

An Ultra-Orthodox Israeli man, accompanied by his children, prepares to cast his ballot at a polling station in Bnei Brak, near the city of Tel Aviv, on March 17, 2015.

The Ultra-Orthodox Will Determine Israel’s Political Future

Netanyahu’s embrace and the left’s hostility have made the fast-growing Haredi Jewish population the right’s most reliable constituency.

Special counsel Robert Mueller leaves after a closed meeting with members of the Senate Judiciary Committee at the Capitol in Washington on June 21, 2017. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

How to Read Between the Lines of the Mueller Report

Here’s what to expect from the long-awaited—and now heavily redacted—probe into Trump’s Russia ties.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and his Russian counterpart, Vladimir Putin, attend a ceremony marking the completion of the sea part of the TurkStream gas pipeline in Istanbul on Nov. 19, 2018. (Mikhail Klimentyev/AFP/Getty Images)

Russia’s Gas Web Ensnares Europe

New pipeline projects throughout the Middle East could boost Russian influence there while also ensuring the country’s role as the prime supplier of energy to Europe.

Immigration’s Cash Rewards

Migrant workers are setting records for sending money home.

Syrian President Bashar al-Assad  shakes hands with U.S. under secretary for political affairs William Burns ahead of their meeting in Damascus on Feb 17, 2010. (Louai Beshara/AFP/Getty Images)

The Long Rise and Sudden Fall of American Diplomacy

One of Washington's most accomplished diplomats has traced how U.S. foreign policy went astray over decades—and how it can get back on track.

U.S. Acting Secretary of Defense Patrick Shanahan delivers remarks at the 35th Space Symposium in Colorado Springs, Colorado, on April 9. (Department of Defense photo by Lisa Ferdinando)

The Trials of Patrick Shanahan

After months of uncertainty, Trump’s acting defense secretary is making his presence felt inside the administration.

Indonesian incumbent Presidential candidate Joko Widodo and his vice presidential candidate Maruf Amin (R), wave during a press conference after the general election on April 17, 2019 in Jakarta, Indonesia. (Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images)

Islam Is the Winning Ticket in Indonesia

Politics has turned religious in the world's biggest Muslim nation — but that's part of democracy too.

Delegates sing the Ukrainian national anthem during the first congress of the new political party National Corps, created from the members of Azov civil corps and veterans of Azov regiment in Kiev on October 14, 2016.

There’s One Far-Right Movement That Hates the Kremlin

Ukraine’s Azov movement is hostile to Russia, friendly to neo-Nazis, and inspired by France’s new right. It’s not running in Ukraine’s presidential elections because it plans to win power by playing a long game.

Cars drive on a new Israeli road divided by a wall to separate it for Palestinians (L) and the side to be used exclusively by Israelis and settlers (R) in East Jerusalem, on January 10, 2019. Route 4370 connects the settlement of Geva Binyamin to the Jerusalem-Tel Aviv highway. The road, which has been called the Apartheid Road, is divided in the middle by a 25-foot wall.

Separation and a Two-State Solution Aren’t the Same

Netanyahu is not the only one who opposes basic Palestinian rights. Almost all Israeli leaders reject the fundamental tenets of sovereignty that would make a Palestinian state genuine and viable.

A miner stands on a mound of dirt at an abandoned industrial mine March 28, 2006 in Mongbwalu, Congo. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Your Cell Phone Is Spreading Ebola

A deadly outbreak in Congo has become a global emergency because of a raging conflict over valuable minerals.

A peatland forest burns to make way for a palm oil plantation on Nov. 1, 2015, on the outskirts of Palangkaraya, in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia. (Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images)

Whoever Wins Indonesia’s Presidential Election, Indigenous People Will Lose

Millions of Indonesians lack basic protections. The presidential contenders don’t seem to care.

An Indonesian election commission worker arranges ballot boxes in preparation for the upcoming presidential and parliamentary elections in Surabaya on March 18. (Juni Kriswanto/AFP/Getty Images)

What’s at Stake in Indonesia’s Elections?

The world’s third-largest democracy goes to the polls.

The spire of Notre Dame collapses as the cathedral is engulfed in flames in Paris on April 15. (Geoffroy Van Der Hasselt/AFP/Getty Images)

‘This Restoration Will Take at Least a Decade’

Despite being spared the worst, Notre Dame is not out of danger, says the building expert Caroline Bruzelius.

Paul Whelan, a former U.S. Marine accused of espionage and arrested in Russia, listens to his lawyers while standing inside a defendants' cage during a hearing at a court in Moscow on Jan. 22. (Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images)

The Maddening Limbo of Paul Whelan

Four months into the former U.S. Marine’s detention in Moscow, Washington is struggling to help free him—or even get him answers.

A fortune-telling fairground attraction bearing the likeness of Donald Trump stands at Washington Square Park in New York on Oct. 14, 2016. (Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images)

The United States Will Be Shocked by Its Future

The only thing that’s clear about the changing world order is that Americans can shape their role in it—and that they’re likely to mess it up.

A youth sleeps beside a campaign banner as people gather for an election campaign rally for Indonesian presidential candidate Prabowo Subianto and his running mate Sandiaga Uno outside the Gelora Bung Karno stadium in Jakarta on April 7, 2019. (Adek Berry/AFP/Getty Images)

Indonesians Fight for Their Right to Not Vote

It's an act of protest—but the government calls it terrorism.

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, left, and Zhihang Chi, Air China's vice president for North America, at Los Angeles International Airport on Feb. 19, 2015. (Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images)

Cities Will Determine the Future of Diplomacy

Urban centers are taking international relations into their own hands.

A picture taken on July 25, 2017 shows Sudanese patients waiting in a hallway at the Radiation and Isotopes Centre in  Khartoum.
In Sudan access to drugs and treatment was impaired by U.S. sanctions.

Lifting Sanctions Isn’t as Simple as It Sounds

Financial wars damage and disfigure economies as much as military ones. Countries ravaged by sanctions need reconstruction, too.

Omar al-Bashir appears during a rally with his supporters in the Green Square in Khartoum on Jan. 9, 2019. (Sharaf Shazly/AFP/Getty Images)

It Takes a Village to Make a Monster

Omar al-Bashir is gone—but he was never the key to Sudan’s oppression to begin with.

Foreign Policy illustration

Only Women Can Stop the Apocalypse

Men make nuclear weapons more dangerous. So why do they still dominate the field?

Heat waves emanate from the exhaust pipe of a city transit bus as it passes an American flag on the Los Angeles County Hall on April 25. (David McNew/Getty Images)

The United States Owes the World $1 Trillion

By failing to live up to its international climate change agreements, the United States has cost the world a bundle in damage.

The Israeli Arab politician Ahmed Tibi casts his vote during Israel's parliamentary elections in in the northern Israeli town of Taiyiba on April 9. (Ahmad Gharabli/AFP/Getty Images)

How Israel Marginalizes Its Arab Citizens

Disaffection prompted the lowest voter turnout in years among Arab Israelis.

Odette Sansom served as a courier spy in Britain’s Special Operations Executive during World War II. (PA Images via Getty Images)

Writing Women at War

A slate of new releases reexamine gender in conflict.

The Palais de Justice in Brussels in 1966. (Bettmann Archive/Getty Images)

The EU’s Buildings Are as Opaque as Its Bureaucracy

Brussels’ sprawling, confusing architecture matches the institution it houses.

A loaded cargo ship sits in the Yangshan Deep-Water Port in China on Dec. 6, 2017. (AFP/Getty Images)

The Dangers of Trade Orthodoxy

By shoving the very idea of trade tensions under the table, models undermine coherent discussion of how to handle them.

Director Jia Zhangke speaks at the New York Film Festival on Sept. 30, 2018. (Nicholas Hunt/Getty Images)

Inside Man

Jia Zhangke’s "Ash Is Purest White," socially critical yet officially sanctioned, strikes a middle path for Chinese cinema.

Sudanese demonstrators protest outside the army headquarters in Khartoum on April 12. (Ashraf Shazly/AFP/Getty Images)

The World This Weekend

FP’s latest on the turmoil in Sudan, Benjamin Netanyahu’s re-election, and Julian Assange’s arrest.

Supporters attend a pro-government rally for Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in Tel Aviv in in March 2015. (Ilia Yefimovich/Getty Images)

How Israel’s Netanyahu Uses Fear and Loathing to Win Elections

On the podcast: The Israeli journalist Anshel Pfeffer looks back at Bibi’s first general election campaign in 1996.

Supporters of the right-wing People’s Party attend the party’s campaign kickoff on April 11 in Madrid. (Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images)

Is Spain Heading for an Electoral Wreck?

In this month’s election, the choice could boil down to a government influenced by a xenophobic party or one under constant threats by separatists.

A mountie salutes Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau outside Parliament in Ottawa, Ontario, on Aug. 29, 2017.  (Lars Hagberg/AFP/Getty Images)

Canada’s Cultish Politics Turn Problems Into Crises

Trudeau’s bumbling autocracy is just the latest example of lockstep partisanship.

James Rebhorn bowls at the Second Stage Theatres 19th Annual All-Star Bowling at Leisure Time Bowling Lanes on February 6, 2006 in New York, New York. (Scott Wintrow/Getty Images)

If You Bowl Alone, You Can’t Fight Together

National security depends on a vanishing sense of community.

U.S. President Donald Trump, right, and Chinese Vice Premier Liu He talk to reporters at the White House on April 4. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

A Win-Win U.S.-China Trade Deal Is Possible

Selling more goods is not enough. Trump’s trade agreement with Beijing must include real structural reforms.

An unarmed Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missile launches during an operational test from Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif., on April 26. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Ian Dudley)

Will Congress Let Trump Build More Nuclear Weapons?

The administration and Capitol Hill are on a collision course over the future of U.S. nukes.

Julian Assange gestures to the media from a police vehicle on his arrival at Westminster Magistrates court in London on April 11. (Jack Taylor/Getty Images)

Julian Assange’s Legal Trouble, Explained

The WikiLeaks founder is in British custody and faces extradition to the United States.

A boy wearing a blue mask with tears of blood participates in a protest march demanding the European Union take action against China in support of the Uighurs, in Brussels, on April 27, 2018. (Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images)

The Mysterious Case of the Disappearing China Sanctions

Mass detention of Uighurs has been superseded by trade talks, say rights advocates.

Pro-Brexit activist Joseph Afrane demonstrates outside the Houses of Parliament in central London on March 20. (Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP/Getty Images)

Brussels Bets a Delay Until Halloween Will Spook Britons into Staying

With support for Brexit eroding, EU leaders hope the long postponement will kill the plan for good.

Russian President Vladimir Putin greets Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan during their joint news conference in Moscow on April 8.

It’s Not Too Late to Stop Turkey From Realigning With Russia

Strains in U.S.-Turkish relations are leading Erdogan into Putin’s embrace. Smart diplomacy and defense assistance can bring America’s NATO ally back into the fold.

Sudanese demonstrators gather in central Khartoum after the toppling of President Omar al-Bashir on April 11. (Ashraf Shazly/AFP/Getty Images)

In Sudan, a Transition to Democracy or a Military Power Play?

Omar al-Bashir’s three-decade rule is over, but demonstrators reject the army’s plan.

Serbian Prime Minister Ivica Dacic, Chinese Prime Minister Li Keqiang, and Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban shake hands at a summit of 16 Central and Eastern European leaders looking to woo Chinese investment in Bucharest on Nov. 25, 2013. (Daniel Mihailescu/AFP/Getty Images)

How China Blew Its Chance in Eastern Europe

Seven years on, the 16+1 project has largely flopped.

A pro-European Union demonstrator holds a placard bearing an image of Russian President Vladimir Putin in central London on June 11, 2018. (Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP/Getty)

The Great Brexit Distraction

Attempts to blame Russia for the EU’s mess will only get in the way of addressing the union’s real problems.

Members of Iran's Revolutionary Guards Corps march during the annual military parade marking the anniversary of the outbreak of the Iran-Iraq war in Tehran on Sept. 22, 2018. (Stringer/AFP/Getty Images)

The Revolutionary Guards Are Ready to Strike Back

The Trump administration has labeled Iran’s most powerful military branch a terrorist organization—and put Americans around the world in danger.

A visitor walks past the logo of the Chinese telecom giant Huawei at the Hannover Messe technology fair in Hanover, Germany, on April 1. (JOHN MACDOUGALL/AFP/Getty Images)

Washington Tries a Softer Approach in Anti-Huawei Campaign

The Trump administration claims progress in signing up European allies in the fight against Beijing.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi and leader of the Bharatiya Janata Party gestures during a roadshow in support of the party's state assembly election party candidates in Varanasi on March 4. (Sanjay Kanojia/AFP/Getty Images)

Is India’s Modi a Reformer or a Performer?

In the world’s biggest democracy, good politics often have nothing to do with good economics.

Israel's Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu meets with Jared Kushner on June 21, 2017 in Jerusalem.

Trump Must Not Let Jared Kushner’s Peace Plan See the Light of Day

Releasing a U.S. proposal that is bound to fail would legitimize Israeli annexation, give Saudi Arabia leverage, and strengthen Iran and its allies.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo meets with leaders from Israel, Greece, and Cyprus to discuss plans for a gas pipeline from the Mediterranean to Europe in Jerusalem on March 20. (Jim Young/AFP/Getty Images)

U.S. Lawmakers Talk Turkey to Ankara

New legislation is aimed at forcing the recalcitrant NATO ally back into the fold.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi waves to supporters during a campaign rally ahead of the national elections in Cooch Behar in West Bengal state on April 7. (Diptendu Dutta/AFP/Getty Images)

India’s Election Is a Referendum on Modi

No matter who wins the vote, governing the world’s largest democracy is about to get more difficult.

Freshman Congressman Michael Waltz, a combat-decorated Green Beret, represents Florida’s 6th congressional district. (Rep. Waltz's website)

‘The 21st-Century Space Race Is On’

Michael Waltz, Congress’s first Green Beret, talks about the new Space Force and America’s budding commercial launch industry.

Carl Muscarello and Edith Shain, who claim to be the nurse and sailor in the famous photograph taken on V-J Day, kiss next to a sculpture based on the photograph in Times Square to commemorate the 60th anniversary of the end of World War II on Aug. 14, 2005 in New York City. (Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Nostalgia Is a National Security Threat

By idealizing the past, Americans have made themselves unsafe in the present.

Shinzo Abe speaks at his party's headquarters in Oct. 2017 (Behrouz Mehri/AFP/Getty Images

How Japan Became the Adult at the Trade Table

While Washington withdraws from multilateral deals, Tokyo has been uncharacteristically leading efforts to save them.

Thailand’s “Red Shirts,” a group that began in support of Thaksin Shinawatra and against the military government, protest in Bangkok on March 31. (Lauren DeCicca/Getty Images)

Thailand’s Groundhog Day

The recent election replayed a similar vote from 1992. And if the historical precedent is any guide, Thai politics are about to get even messier.

Gun-mounted vehicles belonging to fighters loyal to the Libyan Government of National Accord (GNA) near a military compound in a suburb of Tripoli on April 9.

Khalifa Haftar’s Miscalculated Attack on Tripoli Will Cost Him Dearly

The Libyan general was poised to rise to power. Now his unnecessary assault on the capital is alienating key international backers and potential local allies.

Swedish teenaged climate activist Greta Thunberg (C) holds up her Swedish "School Strike for the Climate" sign as she participates in a Fridays for Future march with German climate activists Luisa Neubauer and Jakob Blasel on March 29, 2019 in Berlin, Germany. (Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

The Kids Are Taking Charge of Climate Change

Teenagers around the world are protesting in unprecedented numbers—and making governments nervous.

U.S. President Donald Trump, left, and Israel's Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu shake hands after delivering a speech at the Israel Museum in Jerusalem on May 23, 2017. (Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images)

The Long Game of Benjamin Netanyahu

For two decades, Israel’s prime minister has sought to destroy the prospects for a Palestinian state. With a fifth term, he can finally do it.

Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi participates in a G-20 Africa conference in Berlin on June 12, 2017. (Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

Lawmakers Warn Egyptian Leader Over Human Rights Abuses

A bipartisan group of lawmakers sent a letter directly to Sisi that appeared to suggest security assistance could be in jeopardy.

Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif gestures during a press conference in Tehran on Feb. 13. (Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images)

Iran’s Zarif Can’t Catch a Break

By designating the IRGC a terrorist group, Trump has put the heat on the United States’ one potential ally in Tehran.

Supporters of the Republican People's Party  cheer and wave Turkish national flags in front of the mausoleum of Mustafa Kemal Ataturk in Ankara, on April 8. (Adem Altan/AFP/Getty Images)

Erdogan’s Worst Enemy Is His Only Ally

The real winner of Turkey’s local elections is the ultranationalist MHP party.

A nurse prepares a measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine at the Rockland County Health Department in New York on April 5. (Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images)

How Russia Sows Confusion in the U.S. Vaccine Debate

Not content to cause political problems, Moscow’s trolls are also undermining public health.

Indian women supporting the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) wear masks of Prime Minister Narendra Modi at a rally ahead of the national elections in Hyderabad on April 9, 2019. (Noah Selam/AFP/Getty Images)

Millions of Voters Are Missing in India

Muslims, Dalits, women disproportionately cut from electoral rolls.

US soldiers stand next to coffins bearing the remains of missing soldiers from the Vietnam War on a military transport plane during a repatriation ceremony at Danang airport on April 15, 2018. (Linh Pham/AFP/Getty Images)

Americans Can’t Give Up The Cult of War

The endless conflicts in Afghanistan and the Middle East are ritual, not strategy.

Seumas Milne, the Labour Party's executive director of strategy and communications, leaves the Labour party headquarterson September 20, 2016 in London, England. (Photo by Jack Taylor/Getty Images)

Corbyn’s Pet Stalinist

Seumas Milne loves the Soviet Union, hates the EU, and has the ear of a possible future prime minister.

Sudanese protesters wave a national flag atop a military vehicle next to soldiers near military headquarters in Khartoum, Sudan, on April 7. (AFP/Getty Images)

How Two U.S. Presidents Reshaped America’s Policy Toward Sudan

As thousands protest the Bashir regime, Washington has helped legitimize it.

Commander of U.S. Southern Command Craig Faller, testifies during a U.S. Senate Armed Services Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington on Feb. 7. (Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

U.S. Military Wary of China’s Foothold in Venezuela

The head of U.S. Southern Command says Beijing is using disinformation and debt diplomacy to dig in as Maduro clings to power.

A polling station in Cairo's western Giza district on March 25, 2018, ahead of the vote scheduled to begin the following day, decorated with electoral posters depicting President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi. (Mohamed El-Shahed/AFP/Getty Images)

Egypt’s Prisons Are Becoming Recruiting Grounds for the Islamic State

Abuse behind bars and a record high rate of detainment are a recipe for disaster.

Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi and Coptic Pope Tawadros II during a Christmas Eve Mass at the Nativity of Christ Cathedral outside Cairo on Jan. 6, 2018. (Khaled Desouki/AFP/Getty Images) Coptic Orthodox Christians packed the newly built Nativity of Christ Cathedral for a Christmas Eve mass after a bloody year for the minority singled out by jihadists for attacks. / AFP PHOTO / KHALED DESOUKI        (Photo credit should read KHALED DESOUKI/AFP/Getty Images)

The Double Talk of Trump’s Favorite Dictator

Sisi’s supporters praise his religious tolerance. They shouldn’t.

A security guard walks past a welcoming banner at Pristina International Airport prior to the arrival of the U.S. Vice President Joe Biden in Kosovo on May 21, 2009. (Armend Nimani/AFP/Getty Images)

America Is Wide Open for Foreign Influence

If you’re an outsider with a political agenda, there’s no better country to target than the United States.

Israeli Prime Minster Benjamin Netanyahu points to photos of Likud party members as he delivers a speech during the launch of the Likud party election campaign in Ramat Gan, Israel, on March 4. (Amir Levy/Getty Images)

5 Factors That Will Make or Break Bibi’s Re-Election Chances

The Israeli leader is vying for a fifth term amid corruption allegations.

Donald Trump listens while Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi makes a statement to the press in the Oval Office before a meeting on April 3, 2017 in Washington. (Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images)

Sisi Has His Own Jamal Khashoggi

It’s time to hold Egypt accountable for the U.S. citizens it has unjustly victimized.

A Ukrainian voter examines her ballot at a polling station during the first round of the Ukrainian presidential elections in Kiev on March 31. (Sergei Chuzavkov/SOPA Images/LightRocket/Getty Images)

FP’s Guide to the Ukrainian Election

Eight things to read ahead of a crucial vote.

The astronauts Christina Koch and Nick Hague, who replaced Anne McClain on a recent mission due to a shortage of medium-sized spacesuits, at the Russian-leased Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on March 14. (Sergei SavostyanovTASS via Getty Images)

A Place for Women in Space

A lack of medium-sized spacesuits highlights women’s needs in the workplace.

Israeli far-right demonstrators hold a placard that reads in Hebrew "The Jewish blood will not be abandoned" and a poster of the late Meir Kahane, at the scene of an attack in the Israeli city Rishon LeZion on November 2, 2015. (Jack Guez/AFP/Getty Images)

Netanyahu’s Far-Right Partners Were Birthed by U.S. Terrorists

Brooklyn-born militant Meir Kahane's ideas are becoming dangerously acceptable in Israel.

Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu touch the Western Wall in the Old City of Jerusalem on April 1. (Menahem Kahana/AFP/Getty Images)

The Christian Coalition That Helped Elect Bolsonaro Has Started to Crumble

The Brazilian president’s visit to Israel, which was meant to rally his evangelical base, has instead revealed his weakness.

A Pakistani F-16 fighter jet above Islamabad on March 23, 2016. (Aamir Qureshi/AFP/Getty Images)

Our Best Weekend Reads

This week, U.S. officials contradicted India’s claim that it shot down a Pakistani F-16, and U.S. lawmakers held a historic vote on Washington’s role in Yemen.

Illustration by Shaivalini Kumar and Meroo Seth for Foreign Policy

India Has a Mindset Problem

Jugaad once symbolized immense potential, but the endless shortcuts are now holding the country back.

U.S. President Donald Trump meets with Irish Prime Minister Leo Varadkar at the White House on March 15, 2018. (Chris Kleponis-Pool/Getty Images)

Trans-Atlantic Trade Is Headed Toward Disaster

Trump is mulling new auto tariffs that could send the global economy into a tailspin.

Farah Pandith on April 6, 2016.  (Jemal Countess/Getty Images/Foreign Policy illustration)

How to Defeat Political and Religious Extremism

On the podcast: A former State Department official who led the outreach to the Muslim world after the 9/11 attacks.

An Afghan refugee stands in the sun with her daughter in the coastal town of Cesme, Turkey, on Dec. 4, 2015. (Chris McGrath/Getty Images)

For Afghan Refugee Women, There’s No Escape From Violence

Thousands of women have set off on their own for Turkey, but harassment from Afghan men often follows them to their new country.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo arrives at Camp Alvarado after meeting with Afghan President Ashraf Ghani in Kabul on July 9, 2018. (Andrew Harnik/AFP/Getty Images)

U.S. Eyes Plans to Cut Diplomatic Staff in Afghanistan, Iraq

Officials say it's time to shift diplomatic resources to countering China and Russia.

U.S. President Donald Trump discusses trade policy with Chinese Vice Premier Liu He at the White House on April 4. (Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images)

In Trump’s Economy, the Invisible Hand Belongs to the Government

The state’s role in the U.S. economy has expanded dramatically under President Trump, even as he pushes China to exert less control.

Donald Trump walks into the State Dinning Room to have lunch with Mohammed bin Salman at the White House on March 14, 2017. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

The Moral Peril of Proxy Wars

It’s not an accident that U.S. support for Saudi Arabia’s war in Yemen has been a humanitarian disaster.

Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko in Kiev on Feb. 15, 2015. (Sergei Supinsky/AFP/Getty Images)

Petro Poroshenko’s Last-Minute Nationalist Makeover

Ukraine’s president is making a desperate gambit to win re-election—and to remain politically relevant if he loses.

Latvian Foreign Minister Edgars Rinkevics smiles during a meeting with his Russian counterpart in Moscow on Jan. 12, 2015. (Kirill Kudryavtsev/AFP/Getty Images)

The End of an Era

Latvia’s foreign minister on the demise of the U.S. missile treaty with Russia and NATO’s new focus on China.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi waves at a public rally in Kolkata, India, on April 3. (Atul Loke/Getty Images)

Did India Shoot Down a Pakistani Jet? U.S. Count Says No.

New Delhi and Islamabad had conflicting accounts of a February dogfight.

Supporters of Lebanon's Hezbollah group hold national, Palestinian, and the Shiite movement's yellow flags during a rally held in the Lebanese capital Beirut on Dec. 11, 2017. (AFP/Getty Images)

The Trump Administration Is Making Hezbollah Stronger

By threatening collective punishment over Lebanon’s most disruptive force, Washington is weakening the rest of its society.

Yemenis dig graves for children who where killed when their bus was hit during a Saudi-led coalition airstrike on Aug. 9, 2018. (Stringer/AFP/ Getty Images)

Congress Is Finally Done With the War in Yemen

U.S. lawmakers are making a historic push for peace. But a Trump veto is all but assured.

An EU flag with one of the stars symbolically cut out in front of the Houses of Parliament shortly after British Prime Minister Theresa May announced to the House of Commons that Article 50 had been triggered in London on March 29, 2017. (Oli Scharff/AFP/Getty Images)

Brexit Will Never, Ever End

Even if Britain’s opposing parties agree on a plan to leave the EU, national unity will be nowhere in sight.

Drivers wait in line at the Jaber-Nasib crossing between Jordan and Syria on Jan. 16. (Laith Joneidi/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Syria’s Refugees Begin Their Journey Home

Thanks to a newly opened border crossing with Jordan, migrants are heading back to their country. But their ordeal is far from over.

A boy points at cardboard cutouts depicting, from left to right, Russian President Vladimir Putin, Ukrainian oligarch Ihor Kolomoisky, and Ukrainian presidential candidates Yulia Tymoshenko and Oleksandr Shevchenko during a protest in the center of Kiev on March 29. (Sergei Supinsky/AFP/Getty Images)

In Ukraine’s Election, Pro-Russian Candidates Can’t Win

By occupying the regions of the country that most favor it, Moscow has undermined its own position in Ukrainian politics. Here’s why it still won’t leave.

Prime Minister of North Macedonia Zoran Zaev hands the NATO flag to an honor guard during an official flag-raising ceremony in Skopje, North Macedonia, on Feb. 12. (Robert Atanasovski/AFP/Getty Images)

North Macedonia Gets Coveted Seat at NATO’s Table

The small Balkan country hopes to officially join the alliance by year’s end, the foreign minister says in interview.

South Korean President Moon Jae-in talks on the phone with U.S. President Donald Trump at the presidential Blue House on February 28, 2019 in Seoul. (Photo by South Korean Presidential Blue House via Getty Images)

Moon Jae-in Is the Grown-Up at the Table

Stuck between Trump and Kim, the South Korean president is still showing the way forward.

A commemoration for dead NATO soldiers at the NATO summit in Kehl, Germany, on April 4, 2009. (Action Press-Pool/Getty Images)

The Outdated Alliance?

On NATO’s 70th anniversary, it is time for burden shedding—not burden sharing.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren speaks at a campaign rally at the Stone Cliff Winery on March 1, 2019 in Dubuque, Iowa. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

What Democrats Can Learn From the Left

And what the left needs to learn from Democrats.

Russian President Vladimir Putin sunbathes during his vacation in the remote Tuva region in southern Siberia. The picture was taken between Aug. 1 and 3, 2017. (Alexey Nikolsky/AFP/Getty Images)

Russia Is Tricking GPS to Protect Putin

The Kremlin’s manipulation of global navigation systems is more extensive than previously understood.

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