Podcast

A Dream Deferred

On the podcast: The journalist Laura Wides-Muñoz traces the lives of several immigrants brought illegally to the United States as children.

Undocumented youth and allies begin the Walk to Stay Home, a 15-day walk from New York City’s Battery Park to Washington’s Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial, on Feb. 15, 2018.
Undocumented youth and allies begin the Walk to Stay Home, a 15-day walk from New York City’s Battery Park to Washington’s Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial, on Feb. 15, 2018. Erik McGregor/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

Late last month, the U.S. Supreme Court announced that it would hear an appeal that would decide the future of nearly 1 million young people living without documentation in the United States. The fate of these immigrants, commonly referred to as “Dreamers”—based on the never-passed DREAM Act—is one of the most contentious issues in the immigration debate and has been discussed in Congress and the courts for years. With so much attention being paid to the immigration crisis at the border, many of them fear their plight has been forgotten.

The journalist Laura Wides-Muñoz followed the lives of several Dreamers and wrote a book about them, The Making of a Dream: How a Group of Young Undocumented Immigrants Helped Change What It Means to Be American. She is our guest this week on First Person.

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