Podcast

Argentina, Iran, and the Enduring Mystery Surrounding the Death of a Special Prosecutor

On the podcast: Alberto Nisman accused Argentina’s president of covering up Iran’s role in the 1994 bombing of a Jewish center in Buenos Aires. Then he was shot in the head.

Emergency personnel search for wounded people after a bomb exploded at the Jewish Community Center in Buenos Aires on July 18, 1994.
Emergency personnel search for wounded people after a bomb exploded at the Jewish Community Center in Buenos Aires on July 18, 1994. ALI BURAFI/AFP/Getty Images

Listen and subscribe to First Person from your mobile device:

Via Apple Podcasts | Via Google | Via Spotify | Via Stitcher

Twenty-five years ago this month, a car bomb blew up the Jewish Community Center of Buenos Aires, known by its acronym AMIA, killing 85 people and wounding hundreds more. It was the deadliest terrorist attack in Argentina’s history.

Listen and subscribe to First Person from your mobile device:

Via Apple Podcasts | Via Google | Via Spotify | Via Stitcher

Twenty-five years ago this month, a car bomb blew up the Jewish Community Center of Buenos Aires, known by its acronym AMIA, killing 85 people and wounding hundreds more. It was the deadliest terrorist attack in Argentina’s history.

In investigations over the years, Iran and its surrogate militia Hezbollah emerged as prime suspects, but no one was ever convicted. Iran has denied the accusations.

In 2015, Argentina’s special prosecutor, Alberto Nisman, publicly accused the then-president, Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, of covering up Iran’s role in the attack in order to preserve relations between the two countries. Nisman was found dead just days later. The circumstances of his death remain a mystery to this day.

Damian Pachter wrote extensively about the AMIA bombing and the subsequent investigations as a journalist for the now defunct Buenos Aires Herald. He was the first person to report the death of Nisman, and then he fled to Israel, worried that he might be targeted by Argentina’s intelligence agency. Pachter, currently a correspondent at the news channel i24NEWS, is our guest on First Person this week.

More from Foreign Policy

The Taliban delegation leaves the hotel after meeting with representatives of Russia, China, the United States, Pakistan, Afghanistan, and Qatar in Moscow on March 19.

China and the Taliban Begin Their Romance

Beijing has its eyes set on using Afghanistan as a strategic corridor once U.S. troops are out of the way.

An Afghan security member pours gasoline over a pile of seized drugs and alcoholic drinks

The Taliban Are Breaking Bad

Meth is even more profitable than heroin—and is turbocharging the insurgency.

Sviatlana Tsikhanouskaya addresses the U.N. Security Council from her office in Vilnius, Lithuania, on Sept. 4, 2020.

Belarus’s Unlikely New Leader

Sviatlana Tsikhanouskaya didn’t set out to challenge a brutal dictatorship.

Taliban spokesperson Zabihullah Mujahid

What the Taliban Takeover Means for India

Kabul’s swift collapse leaves New Delhi with significant security concerns.