October 0, 2020

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi looks at sculptures of the terra-cotta army in China’s Shaanxi province on May 14, 2015.

What Is India’s Foreign-Policy Vision?

S. Jaishankar’s “The India Way” is a rare book by a sitting foreign minister.

A man walks by a sign opposing debt repayments to the IMF during the coronavirus lockdown in Buenos Aires on May 22.

How to Fix Argentina’s Recurrent Debt Crises

Why President Fernandez is hoping for Joe Biden to win the U.S. election.

U.S. President Donald Trump shakes hands before a dinner with Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro

What Will the U.S. Election Mean for Brazil’s Diplomacy?

China’s growing influence in Latin America and climate change will both continue to shape the future of the bilateral relationship.

U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders addresses supporters

Our Top Weekend Reads

The lasting impact of Sanders and Corbyn, a profile of the UAE’s invisible Palestinian hand, and a drift toward authoritarianism in West Africa.

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On Election Eve, Economists Struggle to Figure Out a World That’s Unraveled

Both Trump and Biden are winging it when it comes to economic theory—but so are economists, who have yet to get their theoretical house in order.

Protesters hold up their fists up in Lafayette Park, across from the White House, to protest against police brutality and racial injustice on June 14.

Why Inclusion Is Important for U.S. Foreign Policy

If Washington chooses to reengage with the world, it will need to first champion diversity and gender equality.

People head to the voting booths in Charleston, South Carolina

Give All Immigrants the Vote

The United States will be a better place when every resident is represented.

A pedestrian walks outside the entrance to the new Museum of Modern Art building on 53rd Street on Nov. 17, 2004 in New York City.

America’s Cultural Institutions Are Quietly Fueled by Russian Corruption

New data exposes the long reach of foreign oligarchs in the world of philanthropy.

Mohammed Dahlan, a former Fatah security chief, in his office in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, on Oct. 18, 2016.

The UAE’s Invisible Palestinian Hand

An exiled foe of Mahmoud Abbas helped engineer the Arab peace deals with Israel that are infuriating the aging Palestinian president.

Residents of the Galápagos Islands hold a demonstration outside the court where the crew of a Chinese-flagged ship confiscated by the Ecuadorian Navy is attending a hearing, on Aug. 25, 2017.

China’s Hunger for Seafood Is Now Latin America’s Problem

Massively in debt to Beijing, countries in the region can’t stand up to China to protect their coasts.

Google’s offices are seen in downtown Manhattan on Oct. 20.

5 Questions About the Antitrust Case Against Google That You Should Not Be Afraid to Ask

Far from a game-changer, the case highlights how observers continue to get Big Tech wrong.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and Turkish Cypriot leader Ersin Tatar

Changing Tides in Divided Cyprus

The victory of an Erdogan ally in Northern Cyprus spells danger for the island’s reunification prospects—and sets Turkey up for regional hegemony.

Montana Gov. Steve Bullock speaks at the Wells Fargo Arena in Des Moines, Iowa, on Nov. 1, 2019.

Montana’s Most Pressing Electoral Issue Is Suddenly China

Both parties are flinging mud, and Asian Americans stand to suffer.

U.S. President Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin at a press conference in Helsinki, on July 16, 2018.

America’s Dysfunctional Russia Policy Is Unlikely to Improve Under Biden

A continued stalemate in Washington makes this a moment of great danger for Europe.

U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders greets supporters after speaking at a campaign rally in Denver on Feb. 16, during his run to be the Democratic nominee for president.

Democratic Socialists Lost, but Their Ideas Have Won

Even though Bernie Sanders didn’t win the U.S. Democratic nomination and Jeremy Corbyn was beaten badly in Britain’s 2019 election, the movements their campaigns created will live on in left-wing politics on both sides of the Atlantic.

A voter departs with two children after casting her ballot during early voting in the 2020 presidential election on October 29, 2020 in Adel, Iowa.

An International Election Observer’s Advice for America: Trust the Process

Used to monitoring elections in fragile states overseas, the Carter Center is turning its attention for the first time to U.S. elections.

Artak Beglaryan, the elected human rights ombudsman for the Republic of Artsakh, stands in the wreckage of a Stepanakert school in Nagorno-Karabakh on Oct. 23. He was blinded by a land mine in 1995 and now works to document the ongoing conflict with Azerbaijan.

‘We Don’t Believe in a Political Solution’ in Nagorno-Karabakh, Fighters Say

After a month of heavy fighting over the disputed enclave between Armenia and Azerbaijan, a negotiated settlement seems far off—and civilians are paying the price.

The Wilmington ARCO refinery in Los Angeles, California on Dec. 19, 2003.

The End of Oil Supremacy

If Biden wins, oil prices may fall, setting in motion the reconfiguration of the world energy industry.

A supporter uses a mobile phone to take a picture during a rally for U.S. President Donald Trump on Oct. 23, 2020 in Pensacola, Florida.

In Fight for Florida’s Young Latinos, Social Media Becomes the Battleground

Young Cuban Americans have turned the internet into a political battlefield in this must-win swing state, but the Cuban American vote is even more pro-Trump now than in 2016.

U.S. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross and other Trump administration officials sit down with Chinese vice ministers and senior officials for trade negotiations at the Eisenhower Executive Office Building in Washington on Jan. 30, 2019.

Wilbur Ross Remained on Chinese Joint Venture Board While Running U.S.-China Trade War

Chinese documents show that the U.S. commerce secretary did not successfully step down from all his corporate commitments.

A boy walks with jugs of water in a poor neighborhood with a high concentration of Syrian refugees on June 27, 2013 in Beirut, Lebanon.

Beirut Is a Shambles, and Only Refugees Are Helping

The country’s government is AWOL, international donors are wary—but the country’s most reviled residents are making all the difference.

A supporter of Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro takes part in a demonstration in Rio de Janeiro on Oct. 28, 2018.

How Brazil Was ‘Ukrainized’

After an obscure—and confusing—term burst into politics, the country’s far-right may be forever changed.

A Chinese rocket launches

The U.S. Finally Has a Sputnik Moment With China

Fear of Beijing’s technological prowess is driving deep policy shifts.

Former Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn

Why Britain’s Labour Party Kicked Out Jeremy Corbyn

Arguments over anti-Semitism associated with the former leader have consumed the party for years.

An aerial view shows graves in the Nossa Senhora Aparecida cemetery in Manaus, Brazil, on July 20.

Brazil’s First Wave Isn’t Over Yet

Coronavirus cases are spiking again in the country’s north, threatening to increase strain on public hospitals. This time, local governments face even more political pressure to lift restrictions.

This photo taken on September 14, 2020 shows employees work on a car assembly line at a Dongfeng factory in Wuhan on Sept. 14.

China Has the V-Shaped Recovery of Which Trump Can Only Dream

But the structure of its comeback may create problems at home—and abroad.

Mexican then-President Enrique Pena Nieto, U.S. President Donald Trump, and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau sign a revised trade agreement on the sidelines of the G20 summit in Buenos Aires, on Nov. 30, 2018.

Threats and Border Walls Are Destroying the United States’ Biggest Strategic Advantage

Restoring a common purpose with Canada and Mexico is the lowest-hanging fruit in U.S. foreign policy.

A group supporting Ivory Coast's political opposition protest against a third term for President Alassane Ouattara in Abidjan on Oct. 15.

Ivory Coast’s Election Could Do Lasting Harm to Democratic Norms in West Africa

While France and the United States turn a blind eye, Alassane Ouattara is rolling back the region’s democratic gains and legitimizing authoritarian rule.

A partially-masked man walks in Pfarrkirchen, a town in Bavaria, on Oct. 27 after a local lockdown was imposed.

They Conquered COVID-19. Now They’re Struggling.

From the Czech Republic and Germany to the Indian state of Kerala, governments that dealt decisively with the first wave of the coronavirus are drowning in the second wave.

Protesters try to enter the Michigan House of Representatives chamber and are kept out by State Police at the Michigan State Capitol in Lansing, Michigan on April 30.

Election Violence in the United States Is a Clear and Present Danger

Americans expect election-related instability in faraway countries. Here’s how it could happen at home.

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Taiwan Is More Than a Pawn to Be Sacrificed to China

Here are all the reasons why the country and its people matter.

Former White House chief strategist Steve Bannon (right) greets fugitive Chinese billionaire Guo Wengui

Guo Wengui Is Sending Mobs After Chinese Dissidents

Steve Bannon’s billionaire funder claims to be a foe of the Chinese Communist Party, but his targets are fellow exiles.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo

Pompeo Courts the Maldives in Latest Bid to Check China’s Influence

A U.S. Embassy and defense agreements are meant to keep the island nation from falling into Beijing’s orbit.

President Donald Trump with Salman bin Abdulaziz al-Saud, and Egypt's President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi pose for a group photo with other leaders of the Muslim world during the inauguration of the Global Center for Combating Extremist Ideology in Riyadh on May 21, 2017.

Trump’s Middle East Legacy Is Failure

The president has had a handful of successes—but never anything approaching a strategy.

Supporters cheer as Indian Prime Minster Narendra Modi speaks at NRG Stadium on September 22, 2019 in Houston, Texas.

Indian Americans Stir Blue Wave in Deep Red Texas

Trump’s touted his rallies with India’s leader, but the Indian American community is leaning left—and nowhere like in Texas.

Voters wait in line outside Philadelphia City Hall to cast early voting ballots on Oct. 27.

How Does it Feel for 2020 to Be Your Generation’s Defining Year?

Young Americans will be voting in huge numbers. They are also the most globally minded generation since the 1970s.

Members of the Solidarity Party of Afghanistan protest against the U.S.-led invasion of Afghanistan ahead of its 16th anniversary in Kabul on Oct. 6, 2017.

Afghans See No Good Choices in the U.S. Election

Regardless of who wins next week, Afghans feel neither Trump nor Biden will do anything for Afghanistan—they just hope the next president completes the U.S. withdrawal.

A man works on a wooden statue made to resemble US President Donald Trump in the village of Sela pri Kamniku, about 20 miles northeast of Ljubljana in Slovenia, the home country of Trump's wife on August 28, 2019.

How Trump Lost the Balkans

The administration’s see-no-evil diplomacy has produced a dangerous unraveling across the region.

A protester waves the Nigerian national flag while gathering with other protesters to barricade the Lagos-Ibadan expressway.

Shutting Down SARS Won’t End Nigeria’s Security Crisis

The military and vigilante groups may step in where police have failed—and their human rights records are just as bad.

Anti-abortion activists and supporters of naming Judge Amy Coney Barrett as a Supreme Court justice

Let’s Be Honest About Religion and the Courts

As Amy Coney Barrett wrote herself, religious convictions are real and influential on judges.

A protester poses with a banner reading “End SARS” at the Lekki Toll Plaza in Lagos, Nigeria, on Oct. 18.

Nigeria’s Next-Generation Protest Movement

Demonstrations against police brutality—organized on social media and powered by artists and musicians—have shown Nigeria’s youth that they have the power to change society.

A fisherman mends his nets on a fishing boat in Trapani harbor in Sicily on Sept. 7, 2017.

The Mediterranean Red Prawn War Signals Italy’s Lost Leverage in Libya

Italian fishermen are being kidnapped off the coast of Libya—and Rome is too caught up in EU migration politics to help.

Iraqis demonstrate against corruption and lack of services on Sept. 7, 2018, in Tahrir Square in central Baghdad.

The U.S. Middle East Strategy’s Missing Piece is Iraq

The backlash against “forever wars” is no reason to abandon Iraq. Just don’t measure U.S. engagement by the number of troops.

Dan Moss, of the National Potato Council, shortly before joining U.S. President Donald Trump at the White House in Washington, DC, on May 23, 2019.

Trump’s Trade Wars Have Made Bad Agriculture Policies Worse

From suffering U.S. farmers to the pain inflicted on the developing world, everything about U.S. agriculture policy is dysfunctional. The next administration can do better.

Chinese telecom giant Huawei kiosk seen at tech event in Portugal.

Trump Turning More Countries in Europe Against Huawei

Slovakia joins other Eastern European countries signing declarations with Washington aimed at keeping China out of critical infrastructure.

President Donald Trump departs after speaking to media at the White House.

Trump Appointee Seeks to Turn U.S. Media Agency Into a Political Cheerleader

Michael Pack, the controversial head of U.S. government broadcasting, tries to blow up the firewalls that have protected Voice of America and other agencies from political interference.

Supporters of the opposition Pakistan Democratic Movement carry their parties' flags during an anti-government rally in Quetta on Oct. 25.

Pakistan’s Anti-Government Movement May Hit the Brick Wall of the Security State

Economic woes are giving the alliance legs, but overturning a military-backed prime minister is a hard proposition.

Joe Biden waves as he arrives at New Castle County Airport for his trip to Kenosha, Wisconsin, Sept. 3, 2020 in New Castle, Delaware.

70 Is the New 50 for World Leaders

It’s neither a coincidence, nor a problem, that both candidates for America’s highest office are so old.

Photo from North Korea's official Korean Central News Agency showing North Korea's intermediate-range strategic ballistic missile Hwasong-12 lifting off at an undisclosed location near Pyongyang on Aug. 29, 2017.

Does the U.S. Nuclear Umbrella Still Protect America’s Allies?

The next president should move swiftly to reassure allies that the U.S. nuclear guarantee remains credible—or risk rapid nuclear proliferation.

Supporters of the National League for Democracy party in Myanmar

Myanmar’s Elections Won’t Be Free or Fair

Five years after the National League for Democracy won in a landslide, Aung San Suu Kyi’s party fails to live up to its name.

A supporter of U.S. President Donald Trump rallies outside the "Latinos for Trump Roundtable" event at Trump National Doral Miami golf resort in Doral, Florida, on Sept. 25.

In Florida, Many Colombian Americans Fear Biden Is Soft on Socialism

By painting Biden as a far-left sympathizer, Trump is getting a late-election bounce with Florida’s normally Democratic-leaning Colombian community.

A Syrian refugee from the informal Rukban camp shelters a young child outside a U.N.-operated medical clinic in Jordan on March 1, 2017.

Stay and Starve, or Leave and Die

Jordan is dumping refugees on U.S.-held territory near Syria, and the United States is refusing to care for them as conditions worsen.

Former Vice President Joe Biden speaks in Iowa.

Washington’s Foreign Diplomats Frozen Out by Team Biden

Biden’s foreign-policy gatekeepers tell diplomats to hold their calls—until they’re in charge.

A Turkana woman carries firewood near Lokitaung in northern Kenya, where a drought ravaged the livestock population, on March 21, 2017.

In Northern Kenya, the Climate Crisis Shifts Gender Roles

Drought has disrupted the traditional way of life for pastoralists, pushing many women into business for the first time.

Sen. Tim Kaine

Senior U.S. Lawmaker Wants to Scale Back Pay-for-Post Ambassadorships

Both parties have rewarded donors with top diplomatic positions, but Trump has taken it to a new level.

Flanked by Afghan soldiers, mujahideen fighters sit atop an armored personnel carrier with rocket launchers about 500 meters from the presidential palace in Kabul on April 25, 1992.

Afghanistan Is Not Doomed to Repeat Its Past

Peace talks in Afghanistan may come down to an agreement between the Taliban and Kabul on an interim government. Here’s how the sides can avoid the pitfalls of 1992 and 2001.

Actress Deborah Mailman speaks during the UN Global Goals Flag Raising Ceremony on September 24, 2015 in Sydney, Australia.

It’s Called the Sustainable Development Goals Index for a Reason

In defense of our metric for measuring the world’s economic and environmental progress.

The U.S. Department of State building in Washington, DC, on July 22, 2019.

The U.S. Foreign Service Isn’t Suited for the 21st Century

Created for another age, Washington’s foreign-policy institutions have atrophied. The next administration should rebuild and reshape them.

People with Chilean flags take part in a rally ahead of Sunday's referendum, in Santiago, on Oct. 22. Chileans will be asked two questions: if they want a new constitution and who should draft it.

A Year After Protests Began, Chile’s Constitutional Referendum Goes Ahead

On Sunday, after months of protests, voters can choose to keep or begin a process of replacing the current constitution.

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In Chile, One Word Defines the Political Revolution

The Chilean term “facho” evokes the image of Chile’s fascist past—but also of present-day tenacity that thumbs its nose at institutional power.

A Lebanese protester

Our Top Weekend Reads

Lebanon’s Saad Hariri is back by unpopular demand, IR scholars give Trump an F-, and Beltway insiders’ favorite board game.

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Here’s How the 2020 U.S. Elections Resemble Those of Fragile Democracies

A veteran observer of elections in troubled countries describes the undeniable parallels.

U.S. President Donald Trump, Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden, and moderator, NBC News anchor Kristen Welker, participate in the final presidential debate at Belmont University in Nashville, Tennessee, on Oct. 22.

Trump and Biden Are Both Touting Foreign-Policy Failures as Achievements

With the world on fire from Thailand to Nigeria, there wasn’t much talk of international affairs in the final debate of the 2020 campaign—and when there was, both candidates defended flawed approaches to North Korea.

A woman presents a Chinese-language sample ballot for the 2020 presidential election at a polling station near the Chinatown area of Houston, Texas, on Oct. 14.

How Chinese Americans Could Help Democrats Flip Texas

Many in the community worry that Trump’s anti-China rhetoric is fueling hate crimes.

U.S. President Donald Trump, Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden, and moderator Kristen Welker participate in the final presidential debate at Belmont University in Nashville, Tennessee, on Oct. 22.

Campaign Debates Are Democracy Theater

A once-meaningful event has been hollowed out. Here’s how to fix it.

Then-U.S. Vice President Joe Biden (left) sits with Israel's Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu

How a Biden Presidency Could Hurt Netanyahu—and Help Him

Sudan’s decision to forge ties with Israel is one more gift from the Trump administration.

Image: People walk with their hands over their heads as they pass through security checkpoints in Lagos, Nigeria, on Oct. 23.

Nigeria’s Years of Protest

The country has been heading for a reckoning for a while—here’s why anger is boiling over now.

Tibetan flags are displayed as protesters gather in front of the Consulate General of China in Los Angeles on March 10, 2019, to mark the 60th Global Tibetan National Uprising Commemorations.

Beijing’s Human Rights Victims Shouldn’t Support Trump

Tough on China or not, a second term would only spell more misery for Tibetans and other communities victimized by Beijing.

A worker presents a domestically developed chip at the stand of China Electronics Technology Group Corp. during the China International Semiconductor Expo in Shanghai on Oct. 14.

U.S. Plan to Save Semiconductors Misses the Mark, Defense Firms Say

Companies that make microelectronics for the Pentagon argue that the current bill could maintain U.S. defense dependency on China rather than fix it.

A coal trader lifts bags at a coal distribution workshop in the northern city of Mazar-i-Sharif, Afghanistan, on Sept. 26.

The Taliban’s Highway Robbery

After the peace deal with the United States, the militant group has doubled down on collecting “taxes” from Afghanistan’s coal miners.

Early voters line up outside of the Vienna Community Building to cast their ballots for the Nov. 3 election, in Vienna, West Virginia, on Oct. 21, 2020.

There’s Still Time (Barely) for America to Have a Free and Fair Election

Some hard-won active advice for staging a national vote during a pandemic.

An Agni-III nuclear-capable missile is paraded on Republic Day in New Delhi on Jan. 26, 2009.

Is India Overturning Decades of Nuclear Doctrine?

The country has good reason to want first-strike capabilities. But the actual state of its arsenal suggests that it won’t get them.

In this photo illustration, a mobile phone displays the logos for the Chinese apps WeChat and TikTok in front of a monitor showing the flags of the United States and China in Beijing on Sept. 22.

The Era of Full-Spectrum War Is Here

China won round one, and round two went to Russia. Can the United States and its allies take the third?

The South Korean Navy Aegis destroyer King Sejong the Great sails during a drill on the Dokdo/Takeshima islets on Aug. 25, 2019.

Trump, Not Biden, Wrecked American Power in the Pacific

The damage done to U.S. standing in Asia will take decades to repair.

Senegalese soldiers from the U.N. peacekeeping mission in Mali, MINUSMA, on July 24, 2019, a day after suicide bombers in a vehicle painted with U.N. markings injured several troops and civilians in an attack on an international peacekeeping base in Mali.

Peacekeeping Missions and a Marshall Plan Won’t Save Mali

The country needs stronger institutions to bolster public confidence in the democratic system. The international community can help.

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The Game That Ruins Friendships and Shapes Careers

For me, Diplomacy is an addictive quarantine hobby. For my high school frenemy, it was training for the Trump administration.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi waves at the crowd during celebrations of the country's 73rd Independence Day, at the Red Fort in New Delhi on Aug. 15, 2019.

Asian Nationalists Hold the Key to a More Effective U.S. China Strategy

Missing in the current U.S. debate on China is the question of Asian nationalism and how the United States could profitably align with it.

Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden and U.S. President Donald Trump, shown in a reflection, participate in the final presidential debate at Belmont University in Nashville, Tennessee, on Oct. 22.

Trump, Biden Fight to Bitter Draw in Final Debate

Faced with accusations that his family is corrupt, the Democratic challenger gives as good as he gets from Trump.

A Lebanese protester

Why Is Saad Hariri Back in Charge of Lebanon?

An entrenched sectarian political system, self-serving leaders leftover from the civil war, and a protest movement more ambitious than organized seem to have set Lebanon’s revolution back where it started.

U.S. President Donald Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden debate at the Health Education Campus of Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland on Sept. 29.

Poll: How Biden and Trump Differ on Foreign Policy

A survey of academics underscores sharp divergences on key issues but expects bipartisan alignment next year on China, cybersecurity, and counterterrorism.

An Islamic State billboard is seen destroyed in the middle of the road in Qaraqosh, Iraq, on Nov. 8, 2016.

Foreign Fighters’ Life After the Caliphate

In interviews with former Islamic State members in hiding, religious concerns have been replaced with more quotidian worries.

U.S. President Donald Trump kisses German Chancellor Angela Merkel at the annual G7 summit in Biarritz, France, on Aug. 25, 2019.

What Would a Less Europhobic Trump Look Like—if He Wins?

Transatlantic relations are at a low point. But there are reasons why even Trump might want to mend them.

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Surprise! India Is Leaping Ahead in Clean Energy

Long considered climate policy’s problem case, India is exceeding targets and breaking records thanks to fast-advancing technology.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo listens to the NATO secretary general after arriving for a summit in Brussels on Nov. 20, 2019.

House Democrats Pledge to Continue Investigations Into Pompeo—Regardless of Election Outcome

The contenders to lead the House Foreign Affairs Committee all plan to redouble its investigations into the secretary of state’s tenure.

Fire and smoke billow from a Norwegian-owned tanker reported to have been attacked in the Gulf of Oman, in a photo obtained on June 13, 2019.

The Next Administration Needs a Plan for De-escalation in the Gulf

Confrontation with Iran almost dragged the United States into war. Détente would benefit all sides.

Supporters of newly appointed Prime Minister Sadyr Japarov wave Kyrgyz flags during a rally in support of Japarov in Bishkek on Oct. 14.

Kyrgyzstan’s Protests Won’t Keep Corrupt Criminals Out of Politics

Members of the criminal underworld have long turned to politics to avoid prosecution. Ousting one set of corrupt leaders in favor of another won’t end the country’s crisis.

A military parade at Tiananmen Square in Beijing

China’s Nuclear Program Baffled Soviet Intelligence

Declassified documents show how Moscow struggled to understand Beijing’s efforts.

Lebanon's Prime Minister Saad Hariri arrives to attend a church service for former French President Jacques Chirac at the Saint-Sulpice church in Paris on Sept. 30, 2019.

Same Old Hariri, Newly Traumatized Lebanon

After a year of chaos, a familiar face is returning to the top of a country that desperately wants change.

Attendees listen as Indian Prime Minster Narendra Modi speaks at the “Howdy, Modi” event, which U.S. President Donald Trump attended, at NRG Stadium in Houston on Sept. 22, 2019.

Why Indian Americans Matter in U.S. Politics

America’s second-largest immigrant group mostly supports Democratic candidates, but support for Trump has grown since the 2016 election.

The General Assembly Hall of the United Nations

The U.N. Protest Gag Order Lives On

One staffer has accused the United Nations Development Program of muzzling efforts to protest racism.

Tomas Martinez, with Georgia Latino Alliance for Human Rights

Trump’s Assaults on Immigrants Drive Georgia’s Latino Voters

Once solid red, Georgia has become a battleground state in part due to its growing Latino population—and rampant anger at Trump’s immigration policies.

Then-Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga (right) presents flowers to Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe

Abenomics Can Flourish Without Abe

Japan’s new prime minister has the skills to take on the country’s bureaucrats.

oe Biden walks to a meeting of bipartisan members of Congress to begin work on a legislative framework for comprehensive deficit reduction at Blair House, across the street from the White House in Washington on May 5, 2011.

The Realist Case for the Non-Realist Biden

Trump's foreign-policy instincts might be more sound—but he has forfeited the chance to lead.

South African police officers hold protesters back during the funeral procession for Nathaniel Julies—who was shot by police—in Eldorado Park, near Johannesburg, on Sept. 5.

In South Africa, Police Violence Isn’t Black and White

The killing of a coloured teenager in Johannesburg exposed the fraught state of race relations in South Africa—and how the racial hierarchies created by apartheid continue to plague the country.

U.S. forces patrol the area of the town of Tel Tamer, in Syria's northeastern Hasakah province on Aug. 17.

The United States Can Counter Putin and Assad With a Light Footprint in Syria

Washington can reduce Moscow’s influence and support Kurdish allies without a large troop presence in the region.

A U.S. soldier stands guard as a Russian Mil Mi-24 helicopter gunship flies over the Syrian town of Al-Malikiyah near the Turkish border on June 3.

America’s Pullback Must Continue No Matter Who Is President

For all the talk of a new administration boldly reengaging with the world after four years of “America first,” Trump’s strategic retrenchment can only be the start.

Pedestrians walk by Google's offices in downtown Manhattan on Oct. 20.

Why Action Against Google Is Not Enough

The United States can lead the way on innovation in technology regulation—but instead it has fallen far behind.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi participates in a committee meeting at the Parliament House in New Delhi on March 3, 2020.

Angst and Denial in India as It’s Now Officially Poorer Than Bangladesh

Bangladesh, once far behind, just surpassed India in GDP per capita. All the more reason for Modi to focus on the right reforms.

A woman carries washing on her head inside the historical neighborhood in Praia, Cape Verde, on Oct. 8, 2019.

Cape Verde Is Emerging as a Global Pivot Point

Tangled in a geopolitical, economic, and global health storm, these African islands have charted a course to break free.

A masked tourist looks out over New York City from the Edge sky deck  as it reopens to the public amid the coronavirus pandemic on Sept. 2.

Moving Beyond a Post-Pandemic World

In a new book, Fareed Zakaria draws some hard but unavoidable conclusions about dealing with future viruses.

A demonstrator holds up a placard reading “Fake News: Trump Tested Positive” in Konstanz, Germany, on Oct. 3, 2020.

The Case Against Big Tech’s Election Strategies

Misinformation is hyperlocal. Attempts to counter it should be, too.

Internally displaced people with their belongings flee from Nadali district to Lashkar Gah during the ongoing clashes between Taliban fighters and Afghan security forces in Helmand province on October 14, 2020.

The U.S. Once Surged into Helmand Province. Now the Taliban Is, Too.

As Afghanistan peace talks drag on, with Washington sending mixed signals on troop withdrawals, the Taliban make a violent bid for a key province.

A man holds his child inside a malnutrition ward supported by the World Food Programme at Al-Sabeen hospital in Sanaa, Yemen, on Oct. 10.

A U.N. Agency Lauded for Its Work Faces a Funding Shortage

The World Food Program will need more than a Nobel Prize to feed the millions who are newly food-insecure.

Finnish President Sauli Niinisto and U.S. President Donald Trump

‘Crazy Times Are Good Times for Journalists, Unfortunately’

A conversation with Anna-Sofia Berner, U.S. correspondent for Finland’s largest daily newspaper

Members of BTS attend the 2019 Mnet Asian Music Awards at Nagoya Dome in Nagoya, Japan, on Dec. 4, 2019.

China Backs Off From Fight With K-Pop Fans

South Korea’s soft power should be a model for Beijing.

Lebanese demonstrators protest against the government's handling of a collapsing economy, with Lebanon burdened by debt of nearly $90 billion, on Feb. 11, 2020 in Beirut.

Start Preparing for the Coming Debt Crisis

The global financial crisis was just the prelude to what could be coming next. The next administration better be ready.

Russia's President Vladimir Putin (left) and U.S. President Donald Trump

Trump Moves Closer to Renewing Nuclear Treaty With Russia

But Russian negotiators still haven’t agreed to stepped-up verification of its nuclear warheads, a major sticking point.

Then-Canadian Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland speaks at the Canadian Embassy in Washington, D.C., on Aug. 31, 2018.

The Canadian Women Who Changed Trump’s Mind on Tariffs

Chrystia Freeland, Mary Ng, and Kirsten Hillman got the White House to do something rare: back down.

The Wall of Dolls, a memorial to the victims of femicide in Italy

The Victims Femicide Leaves Behind

Italy is one of the only countries with a law to provide for those orphaned by femicide—and it could serve as a model for the rest of Europe.

Abu Dhabi Crown Prince Sheikh Mohammed bin Zayed Al-Nahyan (C) listens to a representative at the Russian pavilion during a visit to the Dubai Airshow on Nov. 17, 2019.

The UAE Is Turning Into the World Capital for Weapons Makers

Years of quiet development are finally paying off, and Abu Dhabi’s defense industry can largely stand on its own feet.

A journalist looks at a map showing the route of a missile apparently mistakenly launched from Taiwan during a press conference in Taipei on July 1, 2016.

China Keeps Inching Closer to Taiwan

The United States needs to get serious about defending the island nation—here’s how.

President Donald Trump speaks alongside Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Vice President Mike Pence.

Trump to Remove Sudan From Terrorist List, Following Behind-the-Scenes Pressure on Israel

The announcement could end Sudan’s three decades as an international pariah. But it comes at a cost.

Lebanese, Palestinian, and Iraqi Americans form a human chain during an Arab unity rally in front of Dearborn City Hall in Dearborn, Michigan, on June 6, 2007.

‘Tired of the Game’: Palestinian Americans Want Trump Out but Have Issues With Biden

In a crucial state like Michigan, Joe Biden will have to convince skeptical Palestinians that he won’t leave them in the lurch—again.

U.S. President Richard Nixon shakes hands with CIA Director Richard Helms

Document of the Week: When Ordering the Assassination of a World Leader Required Secrecy

Unlike Trump, former U.S. President Richard Nixon went to great lengths to cover up plans to assassinate or topple foreign leaders.

Chinese then-Vice President Xi Jinping and U.S. then-Vice President Joe Biden view an honor guard inside the Great Hall of the People on Aug. 18, 2011 in Beijing.

America Needs To Talk About a China Reset

Biden and Trump are debating who is the bigger China hawk. Instead, the next administration should learn from the Cold War to defuse the rivalry.

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Election 2020: What We’re Missing

Daily takes by leading global thinkers on the most important foreign-policy issues not being talked about during the campaign.

An anti-immigration protest in Poland

Deporting Muslim Immigrants Won’t Make Poland Safer

The right-wing government in Warsaw has weaponized a 2016 anti-terrorism law to ruthlessly pursue suspected foreign terrorists while ignoring homegrown threats.

A protester gives the three-finger salute at a rally outside Nonthaburi police station in Bangkok on Oct. 19.

Thai Protesters Claim a Temporary Victory

Both the government and demonstrators are borrowing tactics from Hong Kong.

Pope Francis prays as he addresses the crowd from the window of the apostolic palace overlooking St. Peter's Square during his Angelus prayer at the Vatican on Oct. 18.

The Pope’s Latest Encyclical Is Beautiful—and Hypocritical

“Fratelli Tutti” lays out a set of principles that the Vatican doesn’t apply to its own China deals.

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte (left) and Chinese Premier Li Keqiang shake hands during their meeting at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on Aug. 30, 2019.

Duterte Will Fight Anyone but Beijing

The Philippine president is curiously willing to put China’s interests over his country’s.

John F. Kennedy feeds the pigeons at the Piazza San Marco in Venice circa 1937.

The 4 False Deathbeds of John F. Kennedy

The 35th president grew up wealthy, privileged, callow—and extremely sensitive to the weakness of others.

Indian Minister of External Affairs Subrahmanyam Jaishankar, Japanese Foreign Minister Toshimitsu Motegi, Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga, Australian Foreign Minister Marise Payne, and U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo before their meeting in Tokyo on Oct. 6.

Team Biden Should Start With an Asia Pivot 2.0

U.S. policy to contain China will require a lot more continuity with Trump than Biden’s backers would like to admit.

Lebanese of Armenian origin raise Armenian and Nagorno-Karabakh flags as they take part in a rally in Beirut's neighborhood of Bourj Hammoud on Oct. 9.

The Diaspora May Be Armenia’s Biggest Asset in Nagorno-Karabakh

From online to the front lines, the 7 million-strong Armenian diaspora is rallying to the fight in Nagorno-Karabakh.

Filippo Grandi, the commissioner of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, at an IDP camp

Our Top Weekend Reads

The U.N.’s diversity problem, why Americans are giving up on democracy, and Germany’s successful—yet broken—integration experiment.

A man walks along a street near India Gate amid heavily polluted conditions in New Delhi on Dec. 6, 2019.

Welcome to the Final Battle for the Climate

The great powers have taken big steps to fight global warming. Now attention turns to the rest of the world.

world-election-foreign-policy

The World’s Election

Trump versus Biden is not just about the United States. The whole world is watching the Nov. 3 election to see how U.S. foreign policy may change in the coming months.

A Chinese police security camera is seen outside an ethnic Uighur restaurant on June 29, 2017, in the old town of Kashgar, Xinjiang, China.

Could Cyberattacks Stop the Cultural Genocide in Xinjiang?

State persecution of Muslims in the region depends on high-tech mass surveillance, leaving an open door for other countries to gather intelligence and infiltrate the internment camps.

Demonstrators hold flags with the face of former president Evo Morales during a Movement for Socialism closing rally ahead of presidential elections in El Alto, Bolivia, on Oct. 14.

Will Bolivia’s Elections Usher in a New Wave of Socialism in Latin America?

A year after the leftist leader fled La Paz, Morales is looming over the upcoming vote.

Joint plaintiffs are seen at the courtroom prior to the start of a trial against two Syrian defendants accused of state-sponsored torture in Syria, on April 23, 2020 in Koblenz, Germany.

Assad’s Horrible War Crimes Are Finally Coming to Light Under Oath

A German court is exposing Syria’s systemic atrocities—and ending any hopes of international reconciliation with the regime.

Christina Kampmann, then-family minister of North Rhine-Westphalia, speaks with two children from Syria in Gelsenkirchen, Germany, on Oct. 26, 2015.

Inside Germany’s Successful and Broken Integration Experiment

Five years after the arrival of more than a million refugees, one city in western Germany is emblematic of all that’s gone right—and wrong.

Cardboard figures of Chinese President Xi Jinping, wearing a face mask, and U.S. President Donald Trump stand in front of a souvenir shop in Moscow on June 3.

The Rise of the COVID Dictatorships

Around the world, emergency powers are chipping away at democracy—sometimes with public support.

Top U.N. officials visit a refugee settlement in Kenya

The U.N. Has a Diversity Problem

Westerners are overrepresented in senior positions across the world body.

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The United States Isn’t Doomed to Lose the Information Wars

China and Russia are ramping up their disinformation campaigns in the lead-up to the November vote. It’s time for Washington to fight back.

Voters line-up to cast their ballots at a polling station set up at Noonday Baptist Church for the mid-term elections on November 6, 2018 in Marietta, Georgia.

Americans Are Officially Giving Up on Democracy

New polling shows that a growing share of U.S. citizens want leaders who wouldn’t “bother with” elections.

Protesters attend a rally  in Bangkok on Oct 15.

Thai Protesters Defy New State of Emergency

After a confrontation with the royal motorcade, the government is cracking down.

A view of the construction site of Turkey's first nuclear power plant, Akkuyu, pictured during the opening ceremony in the Mediterranean Mersin region on April 3, 2018.

To Prevent Proliferation, Stop Enrichment and Reprocessing in the Middle East

There is a risk of a nuclear cascade across the region. The United States can stop it by enforcing the gold standard of nonproliferation.

A protester in Belarus

The President of Belarus Has Been Stalling. Now It’s Crunch Time.

A rare about-face by the embattled president and calls by the opposition for a general strike set the stage for a new phase in the two-month-old battle for the country’s political future.

A burned-out Armenian Army BMP-2 infantry fighting vehicle

No, Drones Haven’t Made Tanks Obsolete

Wrecked armor in the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict was down to bad training and terrain, not magical technology.

Abandoned machinery in Pulacayo, a former mining center in Bolivia

Clean Energy Can’t Have Dirty Roots

Securing human rights in the supply chain of critical minerals is vital for a green future.

A “misinformation newsstand” aiming to educate voters about disinformation ahead of the 2018 U.S. midterm elections as seen in Manhattan on Oct. 30, 2018.

Forget Counterterrorism, the United States Needs a Counter-Disinformation Strategy

If the U.S. government wants to win the information wars, Cold War-era tactics won’t cut it anymore.

Rep. Joaquin Castro wears a face mask

Democrats Push for Foreign Aid in Coronavirus Stimulus Fight

While Congress and the White House remain far apart on COVID-19 stimulus talks, some Democrats hope to restore lost U.S. prestige by adding foreign aid to the bill.

Palestinians gather to commemorate the Second Intifada and to protest the Israeli normalization deals in the occupied West Bank on Sept. 28.

What Normalization?

How Israel’s agreements this year with Bahrain and the United Arab Emirates made the Middle East more volatile.

An election worker feeds ballots into a voting machine during an accuracy test at the Miami-Dade Election Department headquarters on Oct. 14 in Doral, Florida.

The United States Needs a Red Team to Protect the Election

Adversaries are trying to undermine U.S. democracy. Hackers and regular citizens must identify weaknesses and make the system resilient in the face of cyberthreats.

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson wears a protective face covering as he arrives at the BBC in central London on Oct. 4.

Deal or No Deal Is No Longer the Point

The United Kingdom is heading for a “hard Brexit” no matter what. Here’s why—and what it means for the country’s economy.

A power plant in the southern Iraqi city of Samawah.

Iraq’s Future Isn’t Oil, It’s Sustainable Electricity

As the country continues to grapple with the aftermath of the Islamic State insurgency, revolutionizing the country’s energy sector could be the key to long-term security.

Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett

Scholars Fear a More Nationalist Supreme Court Under Barrett

Trump’s most enduring legacy might be the long-term repudiation of international law.

U.S. President Donald Trump addresses the U.N. General Assembly.

Trump’s Foreign-Policy Adventures Haven’t All Flopped

For all the chaos, the Trump administration has notched some notable victories abroad. The question is whether they outweigh everything else Trump brought to Washington—and the world.

A pedestrian walks by a mural that says “I Love Guam” in Tamuning, Guam, on Aug. 14, 2017.

Counter China by Making Guam a State

More than a partisan move, statehood would be a foreign-policy masterstroke.

An unexploded BM-30 Smerch missile is seen on the outskirts of Stepanakert, Nagorno-Karabakh, on Oct. 12.

Tehran’s Worst Nightmare

The Nagorno-Karabakh conflict could spill over to Iran’s Azeri minority, setting off a battle the government can’t contain.

Blessing Agbo, a nurse, places a contraceptive implant for Habiba, a 30-year-old patient who didn’t give her last name, in Kaugama on Aug. 13. Habiba, who has six surviving children after 10 births, says she wants to take a break from bearing children. Shola Lawal for Foreign Policy and The Fuller Project

Isolated in Rural Nigeria—and Waiting for America to Vote

Across much of the world—including one remote Nigerian village—the availability of family planning will largely depend on the outcome of the U.S. presidential election.

Chinese Premier Lie Keqiang and Australian then-Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull during a state visit in Sydney on Mar. 25, 2017.

China Learns the Hard Way That Money Can’t Buy You Love

Few countries have soured more rapidly against China than Australia, as decades of influence-building by Beijing come to naught.

A handout picture provided by the Iranian Army's official website on Sept. 11 shows an Iranian Simorgh drone carrying a weapon during a military exercise in near the Strait of Hormuz.

A Partial Ban on Autonomous Weapons Would Make Everyone Safer

Great powers stand to lose the most from weapons like drone swarms and should back a limited ban on the most dangerous systems.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel gives a speech during a press conference at the end of a meeting with Chinese Premier Li Keqiang in Beijing on Sept. 6, 2019.

Merkel’s China Reset Is Mostly Hollow

Washington shouldn’t expect—and may not need—a coordinated policy with Berlin.

A Central American migrant and his child

The Feds Moved Migrants in Unmarked Vans Overseas

Homeland Security rented vans to illegally hustle migrants to the border—in a foreign country.

A ship in flames is pictured at the port of Beirut following a massive explosion that hit the heart of the Lebanese capital on Aug. 4.

How a Maritime Deal With Israel Could Ease Lebanon’s Woes

Beirut could tap billions of dollars in natural gas revenue if it can resolve the border dispute.

Riot police detain protesters at a march in Belarus on Oct. 11.

Lukashenko’s Talk Offers Could Trap Him or Protesters

The besieged autocrat is stuck between Russia and a hard place.

U.S. President Donald Trump on the Truman Balcony of the White House after returning from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on Oct. 5 in Washington, DC.

Investors Are Already Treating America Like an Emerging Market

Election chaos, social unrest, and weak institutions make the United States too risky for a developed economy.

People arrive to watch the actress Zsofia Szamosi perform in the play Pali at the Jozsef Katona Theater in Budapest on Jan. 18, 2019.

Orban’s Macbeth

The tragic figure behind the Hungarian populist leader’s efforts to remake his country’s theater.

Arctic Competition Power Map

Arctic Competition – Part One

In Part I of FP Analytics’ Arctic Competition Power Map, we visualize how climate change is physically transforming the Arctic, lay out the scale of potential resources that will be made available, and detail the positions and interests of major players in the region.

Russian matryoshka dolls depicting Russian President Vladimir Putin and U.S. President Donald Trump on sale at in Moscow on July 13, 2018.

America Must Promote Democracy, Despite Trump’s Disdain for It

Even if 2020 marks a low point of U.S. democratic practice, supporting liberalism abroad must remain a vital element of U.S. foreign policy.

Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett is sworn in at her Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing  on Oct. 12 in Washington.

Democrats Can’t Reverse the Damage of the Trump Era Overnight

Republican activists have spent decades building a movement, winning state and local elections, and grooming a generation of conservative judges. If the left wants to win and keep power, it must learn from the right’s successes.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo stands next to President Donald Trump as he speaks.

Pompeo’s Next Mission, Like His First: Clinton’s Old Emails

Mike Pompeo’s rush to placate Trump and release old emails from Hillary Clinton worries many in the State Department who fear both its illegality and interference in the election.

Ultra-Orthodox Jews, some wearing face masks, pray during the Sukkot holiday at the Western Wall in the old city of Jerusalem, on Oct. 7 amid Israel's second coronavirus lockdown.

The Government Can’t Save Ultra-Orthodox Jews From COVID-19. Religious Leaders Can.

The coronavirus has hit Haredi enclaves hard, but without clear directives from rabbis, isolated communities from Jerusalem to New York will continue to suffer.

U.S. President Donald Trump participates in a full honors welcome ceremony for new Secretary of Defense Mark Esper

Trump Taps Loyalists for Top Pentagon Liaison Jobs

It risks Trump burrowing loyalists into career positions to undermine a Biden administration, multiple former officials say.

U.S. President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump arrive for the state dinner with China's President Xi Jinping and China's first lady Peng Liyuan

Beijing Believes Trump Is Accelerating American Decline

Public intelligence assessments of China’s 2020 election preferences only tell half the story.

Young Pakistani youths hold national flags during a cycling competition near the Pakistan-China border on June 30, 2019.

Pakistan Is Doing Its Own Political Reengineering in Kashmir

After condemning New Delhi for its machinations in Jammu and Kashmir, Islamabad is quietly changing the status of Gilgit-Baltistan on its side of the Line of Control.

A Trump supporter holds a “Q” sign at a rally in Ohio on Aug. 4, 2018.

QAnon’s Sound and Fury

Where the conspiracy came from and what it means for politics at home—and abroad.

A picture shows the U.S. embassy complex, still under construction, in the heavily fortified Green Zone, on the west bank of the Tigris River in Baghdad on Oct. 11, 2007.

America’s Iraqi Embassy Is a Monstrosity Out of Time

The United States is threatening to close its outpost in Baghdad. It should have done so yesterday.

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