2021

Then-U.S. Vice President Joe Biden arrives at a U.S. base in Maidan Shar.

From Moral Responsibility to Magical Thinking: How Biden Changed His Mind on Afghanistan

After 9/11, Biden embraced the idea that U.S. troops should leave the country better than how they found it. Now, as president, he’s withdrawing them regardless.

A sadhu bathes in the Ganges River in Haridwar, India, on April 12.

What in the World?

A weekly international news quiz from Foreign Policy.

Supporters of Naxalite People’s War Group wait for leaders to address a public meeting in India’s Guntur district on Oct. 11, 2004.

India Embattled

The country can’t contain insurgent movements until it has a comprehensive national plan for tackling them.

U.S. President Joe Biden speaks about climate change issues,

Biden Plans Big Pledge on U.S. Emissions Cuts

Washington wants to reclaim climate leadership and get other major countries to ramp up ambitions.

A U.S. soldier during Operation Khanjari in Afghanistan.

Biden Just Made a Historic Break With the Logic of Forever War

But will he really end the United States’ other open-ended conflicts?

Joe Biden walks through Arlington National cemetery to honor fallen veterans of the Afghan conflict in Arlington, Virginia on April 14, 2021.

Biden’s War at Home Over Afghanistan Is Just Beginning

After making the right call on withdrawal, the U.S. president better get ready for second-guessing.

anthropocene-overrated-joan-wong-illustration-hp

The Anthropocene Is Overrated

The way we talk about climate change and our effect on the planet is all wrong—and increasingly dangerous.

Man gets vaccine

America’s Come-From-Behind Pandemic Victory

China was the global winner of the coronavirus disaster—until the United States beat the odds.

The Royal Navy flag is hoisted during preparations for a commemoration event on the 75th anniversary of the D-Day landings in Arromanches-Les-Bains, France, on June 6, 2019.

The United Kingdom Finally Acknowledges Its Hard-Power Limits

In its new defense and foreign-policy posture, the country is no longer trying to punch above its weight.

U.S. Army troops from the 10th Mountain Division collect their duffels after returning from a nine-month deployment in Afghanistan to Fort Drum, New York, on Dec. 8, 2020.

What to Do With U.S. Forces in the Persian Gulf

As the United States leaves Afghanistan, the question of troops in the Middle East to support the Afghan mission looms large.

A donkey stands tied up next to a burnt area of Amazon rainforest reserve, south of Novo Progresso in Para state, on August 16, 2020.

Biden’s Back Channel on the Amazon

Rocky Brazil-U.S. diplomacy on protecting the rainforest approaches a pivotal moment.

Margaret Thatcher Kurds Iraq

Britain’s Post-Brexit Foreign Policy Can Be a Force for Good

Boris Johnson shouldn’t shy away from global leadership and the morally driven approach that protected Kosovars and Iraqi Kurds in the 1990s.

Nasser al-Qudwa

Arafat’s Nephew Is Coming for Abbas

Veteran diplomat Nasser al-Qudwa could prompt a realignment within Palestinian politics.

biden afghan withdrawal

Is Leaving Afghanistan Misguided or Overdue?

Biden’s withdrawal announcement is meant to end a 20-year war, but Washington has been dragged back into conflicts before.

Protesters chant slogans during a rally in Amman, Jordan.

Jordan Has Become a Banana Monarchy

The country is imploding under America’s watch.

A view of a ruby star atop one of the Kremlin's towers in downtown Moscow on Dec. 9, 2019.

U.S. Slaps Wide-Ranging Sanctions on Moscow—but Stops Short of Killer Blow

The Biden administration takes a novel, broad-brush approach to Russia’s nefarious activity.

U.S. President Joe Biden leaves after speaking to U.S. State Department staff.

Biden to Announce Nominees for Key Diplomatic Posts

Experts and former diplomats want to see Biden pick up the pace on nominations to better compete with China on the world stage.

U.S. and Japanese Navy ships

America and India Need a Little Flexibility at Sea

A U.S. operation targeting Indian claims has drawn unnecessary outrage.

Then-U.S. Vice President Joe Biden speaks as he meets with Jewish community leaders at the David Posnack Jewish Community Center to discuss the nuclear deal reached with Iran in Davie, Florida, on Sept. 3, 2015.

U.S. Mounts All-Out Effort to Save Iran Nuclear Deal

Chief negotiator Robert Malley begins to forge a compromise with both Iran and hard-liners at home.

U.S. President Joe Biden speaks about the withdrawal of U.S. troops from Afghanistan from the Treaty Room in the White House in Washington, on April 14.

The Wisdom of Leaving Afghanistan

The United States hadn’t accomplished its goals in 20 years. The next few weren’t going to make much of a difference.

Uyghurs protest lack of information and treaty ratification.

Yes, the Atrocities in Xinjiang Constitute a Genocide

Beijing’s own words and actions highlight the intent to end the Uyghurs as a people.

Guillermo Lasso celebrates after runoff elections on April 11 in Guayaquil, Ecuador.

Ecuador Just Voted Against Populism, but Its Democracy Is Far from Healthy 

Conservative Guillermo Lasso will take office as an isolated president with a weak mandate, tasked with restoring faith in the country's institutions.

U.S. Army soldiers arrive home from Afghanistan.

Biden Is Done with Afghanistan. Is Afghanistan Done With America?

Pulling out all U.S. troops is the administration’s risky plan to pressure Kabul and the Taliban to make peace.

Afghan security forces conduct a military operation.

Biden’s Withdrawal Plan Sets the Clock Ticking in Afghanistan

With troops to depart on Sept. 11, the next five months are critical for any chance of peace.

World Health Organization Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus wears a mask after leaving a ceremony in Geneva on June 11, 2020.

The World Should Treat Pandemics Like It Treats Chemical Weapons

Plans for a global pandemic treaty don’t solve the problem of China’s refusal to cooperate.

Christina Oh and Lee Isaac Chung of "Minari"

Asian Americans Belong, but Sometimes It’s Hard for Us to Believe It

Oscar-nominated “Minari” is about flowering in the United States—with the aid of our elders.

A Slovak Armed Forces aircraft unloads doses of the Sputnik V vaccine at the Kosice International Airport in Slovakia, on March 1.

Sputnik V’s Biggest Legacy May Be Political Turmoil

In Eastern European countries that have accepted the Russian vaccine, destabilization has followed.

2018 jordan protests

­­A Hashemite Family Reunion Can’t Hide Jordan’s Woes

Making nice after an alleged coup attempt obscures serious challenges, including water scarcity, a refugee crisis, and unhelpful neighbors.

Chadian President Idriss Déby casts his ballot at a polling station in N'djamena on April 11.

Why the World Won’t Criticize Chad

Western democracies look the other way as a dictatorial ally in the war on terror holds another election marred by violence and intimidation.

Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga speaks during a press conference.

The Summit That Can’t Fail

Japan’s prime minister visits Washington at a time when, thanks to Chinese aggressiveness, U.S.-Japan relations are critical.

The paneled roof of Blackfriars Bridge, currently the world’s largest solar-powered bridge, is seen from the south bank of the River Thames in London on July 4, 2017.

The Future of Solar Is Small

Local community projects are already powering parts of London and could pave the way for a green transition.

Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif speaks during a press conference at the International Conference on the Legal-International Claims of the Holy Defense in the capital Tehran on February 23, 2021.

Nuclear Sabotage Could Be What Iran Needed

This week’s attack on an Iranian enrichment facility has improved the country’s negotiating position.

Two girls stand at the entrance of a tent in an IDP camp in Syria.

Assad Regime Continues Stonewalling U.S. Aid to Syria

Syrian government is using aid deliveries as a weapon, State Department reports.

India Female Farmers Illustration

India’s Suffering Female Farmers Have the Most to Lose

The country’s rural Dalits are already exploited—and know it can get worse.

King Abdullah II bin Al Hussein of Jordan speaks at the United Nations General Assembly on September 24, 2019 in New York City.

Jordan’s King Is His Own Worst Enemy

There’s much more evidence of the monarch’s poor governance than a foreign conspiracy against him.

Asaduddin Owaisi arrives at Parliament House in New Delhi.

Asaduddin Owaisi’s Bid to Redefine Indian Secularism

Muslims need their own nationwide party, he believes. And he’s going to build it.

Nationalists and Loyalists riot at the Peace Wall gates which divide the two communities on April 7 in Belfast, Northern Ireland.

How Brexit Lit the Fuse in Northern Ireland

Loyalist fears that Boris Johnson is abandoning them have sparked a wave of violence that could endanger the Good Friday Agreement.

Soldiers return home from Afghanistan

Biden Faces His First Disasters in Yemen and Afghanistan

Unless it changes tack, the administration is about to make bad situations even worse.

Pao Ge Vang, 5, waits for the school bus to take him home after his second day in kindergarten at Herndon-Barstow Elementary School in Fresno, California, on Dec. 10, 2004. The Vangs are among thousands of Hmong refugees who fled Laos for Thailand 30 years ago and were part of the current U.S government resettlement program for up to 15,000 Hmong.

The United States Can’t Welcome More Refugees Without Reforming Its Resettlement System

Trump gutted the programs that helped aid and place migrants. Now Biden is left with a mess.

Bharatiya Janata Party leader Narendra Modi takes a selfie with his mobile phone after voting at a polling station in Ahmedabad, India, on April 30, 2014.

You Say ‘Coup,’ I Say ‘Koo’

India is a warning about unintended consequences for those looking to regulate Big Tech in the United States.

Ukrainian soldiers on the front line in Donetsk.

Ukraine Needs a Clear Path to NATO Membership

Russia’s recent aggression along its border shows why Kyiv needs decisive action from the alliance.

Solar panel technicians check a solar panel in the final stage of production in Baoding, Hebei Province.

When Clean Energy Is Powered by Dirty Labor

Most solar panels come from China, and using them to fuel a clean energy transition risks reliance on Uyghur slave labor in Xinjiang.

Israel's controversial separation wall runs between the Israeli settlement of Pisgat Zeev (left), built in a suburb of East Jerusalem, and the Palestinian Shuafat refugee camp (right) on Feb. 11.

The ICC’s Israel Investigation Could Backfire

It’s more likely to inflame nationalist sentiments than change anything on the ground.

Then-U.S. Ambassador to Malta Gina Abercrombie-Winstanley

State Dept. Out to Tackle Diversity Failings With New Appointment

Career diplomat Gina Abercrombie-Winstanley will be tasked with reversing the department’s record of big promises and little results.

A monitor displays a virtual meeting between U.S. President Joe Biden, Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, and Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison at Suga’s official residence in Tokyo on March 12.

Sanctioning India Would Spoil the Quad

Let India buy its weapons from Moscow. The real strategic threat is Beijing.

biden-100-days-fdr-lincoln-obama_Illustration-KLAWE-RZECZYn-hp

The Most Vital 100 Days Since FDR

Just like Roosevelt, Biden must show that government still works.

Joe Biden at Dover Air Force Base in Delaware.

How Biden Will—and Won’t—Battle the Pentagon

What the new president really thinks about the military—and what the military really thinks about him.

A car drives past a campaign billboard of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

Israel’s Government Has Nobody at the Wheel

A cycle of deadlocked elections has left the country without a functioning administration—and a foreign policy set on autopilot.

A police van outside the Grand Mosque in Shadian, China.

China’s Crackdown on Islam Brings Back Memories of 1975 Massacre

Islamophobia has spread far beyond the persecuted Uyghur minority.

A U.S. soldier fires a rocket-propelled grenade during a firefight with insurgents in the Pech Valley, Afghanistan, on June 22, 2012.

A Masterful Account of America’s Doomed Afghanistan Mission

Wesley Morgan’s “The Hardest Place” is embedded reporting at its finest.

A snack vendor in Dhaka, Bangladesh

Bangladesh’s Long Journey From ‘Basket Case’ to Rising Star

But 50 years after independence, an authoritarian turn casts a shadow over the country’s future.

Xi Jinping with PLA soldiers in Hong Kong

Yes, You Can Use the T-Word to Describe China

China is governed by a totalitarian regime. Why is that so hard to say?

Russian President Vladimir Putin inspects military exercises.

Is Russia Preparing to Go to War in Ukraine?

Troop buildup near Ukraine’s border is the largest since 2014.

Angela Merkel and Joe Biden pose for photographers prior to their trilateral talks during the Munich Security Conference in Munich on Feb. 7, 2015.

Sanctions Won’t Stop Nord Stream 2. Diplomacy Will.

Quiet negotiations with Berlin can do what economic coercion can’t.

The French philosopher and writer Bernard-Henri Lévy in Paris on Nov. 24, 1986.

It’s Time to Take Bernard-Henri Lévy Seriously

A close reading of the philosophical career, and influence, of France’s most ridiculed public intellectual.

A national flag show is seen at Chaoyang park in Beijing on Sept. 30, 2006.

The Power of Narrative

A new book explains why some nations rise and others don’t.

A nurse holds a newborn baby wearing a face shield in an effort to halt the spread of COVID-19, at Praram 9 Hospital in Bangkok, on April 9, 2020.

COVID-19’s Baby Bust

Disasters usually come with falling birth rates. But this time, they might not recover unless governments take action now.

Palestinian woman walks past election mural in Gaza.

The Return of Palestinian Politics

Elections in May will be the first since 2006—a remarkable but risky gambit.

Jake Sullivan speaks alongside President-elect Joe Biden.

The Sullivan Model

Jake Sullivan, Biden’s “once-in-a-generation intellect,” is facing a once-in-a-generation challenge.

General view of Peruvian presidential candidates during the third and final televised debate organized by the National Electoral Jury in Lima on March 31.

South America’s Election Super Sunday

“None of the above” is a popular vote in Ecuador and Peru, spelling legitimacy troubles.

Japan’s Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga (right) sits next to a monitor displaying a virtual Quadrilateral Security Dialogue meeting with U.S. President Joe Biden (top left), Australia’s Prime Minister Scott Morrison (bottom left), and India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi (bottom right), in Tokyo on March 12.

Japan Toughens on China as Beijing Issues Threats

Pro-engagement politicians are aging out of the Liberal Democratic Party.

Protesters hold homemade weapons during a demonstration against the military coup in Yangon's Tamwe township in Myanmar on April 3.

Myanmar Is on the Precipice of Civil War

Existing conflicts with ethnic groups add fuel to the fire.

People carry their belongings while walking in a flooded street.

Britain’s Immigration Overhaul Is Shortsighted

The United Kingdom needs to prepare for future climate migrants rather than obsessing over asylum-seekers.

Benin's President Patrice Talon at a press conference in Paris.

Benin’s King of Cotton Makes Its Democracy a Sham

Talon’s procedural reforms have hollowed out fair elections and are a master class in entrenching autocracy.

U.S. President Joe Biden talks to reporters.

It’s Still Hard to Be America’s Ally

Biden wants to rebuild relationships, but old friends aren’t so sure.

German emergency personnel load the stretcher used to transport Russian opposition politician Alexei Navalny, at Charité hospital in Berlin on Aug. 22, 2020.

A Chance to Stop Syria and Russia From Using Chemical Weapons

Moscow and Damascus have evaded all accountability, but Biden can build a coalition to change that.

U.S. Border Patrol agents apprehend a group of migrants near downtown El Paso, Texas, on March 15.

On Immigration, ‘Building Back Better’ Isn’t Enough

Rather than taking Obama-era policies as a baseline, Biden needs to start from scratch.

Supporters of Hernando de Soto attend a campaign rally.

Peru’s Election Is About to Make Its Problems Worse

This weekend’s vote will deepen the pandemic-ravaged country’s impasse.

Recep Tayyip Erdogan salutes his supporters during a rally at Istanbul's Yenikapi fairground to show solidarity with Palestinians after Israels aggression against Palestinian civilians on the Gaza border in Istanbul on May 18, 2018.

How Erdogan Got His Groove Back

It’s been a difficult and dizzying few months for Turkey—which is just the way the president likes it.

Soldiers at Clark Air Base in the Philippines.

Philippines Leaning Toward Allowing U.S. Troops After All

But the Biden administration still faces an unreliable ally in Duterte.

Christine Schraner Burgener arrives at Sittwe Airport in Myanmar’s Rakhine State.

The End of Quiet Diplomacy in Myanmar

The U.N. dials up the pressure campaign against Myanmar’s putschists.

A view of a damaged school building due to bombardment by pro-government forces in Kansafra, in Syria's Idlib province, on March 3.

10 Years On, Syrians Have Not Given Up

A survivor of regime atrocities explains why the international community must act.

People protest against anti-Asian violence.

We Don’t Have the Words to Fight Anti-Asian Racism

Tangled questions of Asian identity need answers that aren’t defined by U.S. terminology alone.

People pray in the Great Mosque of Paris.

French Secularism Isn’t Illiberal

Letting culture wars drive debate about “laïcité” obscures similarities between France and the United States.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu leaves the Muni World conference in Tel Aviv, Israel, on Feb. 14, 2018.

Israel’s Osirak Option

As Netanyahu forms his government, the parallels between the politics that led to a strike on Iraq’s nuclear facility and those that could result in targeting Iran today are clear.

A member of the Amhara special forces and a member of the Amhara militia stand at Ethiopia’s border crossing with Eritrea in Humera, Ethiopia, on Nov. 22, 2020.

How Far Will the Ethiopian-Eritrean Alliance Go?

Former foes have found a common enemy in the TPLF. Will it lead beyond battlefield cooperation?

German Economy Minister Peter Altmaier holds a paper with a graph of German GDP in Berlin on Jan. 27.

GDP Didn’t Save Countries From COVID-19

The pandemic’s impact shows growth is an arbitrary target.

A U.S. aircraft carrier leaves its San Diego port.

Will Americans Die for Freedom of Navigation?

The Navy’s favorite tool in Asia is deeply flawed.

Larry Summers receives applause from Microsoft co-founder and Chairman Bill Gates during commencement ceremonies at Harvard University on June 7, 2007.

The Death of Neoliberalism Is Greatly Exaggerated

The West’s economic orthodoxy of the past 40 years has been shaken by the pandemic—but the fight isn’t nearly over yet.

Protesters walk on an image of Chinese President Xi Jinping in the Causeway Bay area in Hong Kong on Oct. 1, 2019.

China Has an Image Problem—but Knows How to Fix It

Many in Beijing realize a declining international reputation won’t help the country achieve its goals.

Peter Dutton speaks in Australia's parliament.

Will Australia’s New Defense Minister Play Bad Cop to China?

Peter Dutton stopped the refugee boats. His next job is stopping Beijing’s maritime militia.

A woman examines a display of books about Chinese President Xi Jinping.

The U.S.-China Clash Is About Ideology After All

Claims that the rivalry is purely geopolitical don’t hold water.

European Executive Vice President Margrethe Vestager

Big Talk on Big Tech—but Little Action

In both the U.S. and EU, antitrust and regulatory efforts against Facebook, Google, and Amazon are gaining traction. But no one’s about to break them up.

kabul university attack

How Liberal Values Became a Business in Afghanistan

Washington promised to bring liberal democracy to Kabul. It created a bloated and ineffective sector of artificial NGOs instead.

A sweeper cleans a deserted bus station after the provincial government suspended public transport during a lockdown in Peshawar, Pakistan, on April 3.

Pakistan’s Geoeconomic Delusions

The country says it wants to pivot from hard power to economic power, but its economy begs to differ.

WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus takes off his glasses and rubs his eyes.

The World Needs a Post-Pandemic Health Treaty With Teeth

WHO has no power to demand openness or independently confirm data at present.

Frontline workers wait to get the COVID-19 vaccine.

What’s Behind India’s Second Coronavirus Wave?

Waning immunity, new virus variants—India’s sharp surge could be caused by any number of alarming factors.

Tsai Ing-wen stands in front of a group of masked soldiers.

Taiwan’s COVID-19 Success Is Worryingly Smug

Beating the pandemic has made the government and people overly complacent about China.

A couple walks past a graffiti mural in Lebanon.

Nobody Knows What Lebanon’s Currency Is Worth Anymore

In Lebanon’s absurd economy, money’s value depends on whom you ask.

A photo from the film “The Mole Agent.”

Octogenarian Sherlock Holmes

Oscar-nominated “The Mole Agent” is a film noir take on life in a Chilean nursing home.

Refugees walk with their goats in floodwaters at the Dadaab refugee complex, in the northeast of Kenya, on April 17, 2018.

The West’s Obsession With ‘Good Refugees’ Is Bad Policy

Wealthy countries love to celebrate immigrant success stories, but they are letting many potentially productive citizens fall through the cracks.

Supporters of the Hong Kong pro-democracy protesters in Sydney.

Australia Is Under Pressure to Implement Magnitsky-Style Laws

Both Washington and the Australian public want more sanctions on China.

Russian President Vladimir Putin speaks during a rally marking the seventh anniversary of Russia’s annexation of Crimea at the Luzhniki Stadium in Moscow on March 18.

Russians Aren’t Buying Putin’s PR Stunts Anymore

To save its approval ratings, the Kremlin might be better focusing its energy elsewhere.

A man reads a local newspaper showing a photograph of U.S. President-elect Joe Biden, in Kabul on Nov. 8, 2020.

In Afghanistan, the Choice Isn’t Withdraw or Endless War

A middle path, with a greater role for India, is still possible—and preferable to either extreme.

Mohamed Salah of Liverpool scores a goal against Manchester United.

Soccer’s Financial Crisis Could Transform Leagues Forever

Private equity’s power may eliminate promotion and relegation.

Tourists photograph elephants in Queen Elizabeth National Park.

When Nature Conservation Goes Wrong

Environmentalists’ intent on saving the planet by protecting natural habitats are creating human disasters of their own.

A visitor uses a virtual reality headset during the “Laval Virtual” virtual reality, augmented reality, and 3D technology show in Laval, France, on April 6, 2018.

It Is Western Europe’s Turn for a Brain Drain

Knowledge-sector jobs are heading to Eastern Europe, and the consequences could remake the EU.

A portrait of Jennifer Doudna, inventor of the revolutionary gene-editing tool CRISPR.

What Is It to Be Human Anymore?

Walter Isaacson explores the future of gene editing. But that future is already here, and it’s more than a bit scary.

Paraguayan President Mario Abdo Benitez (C), flanked by his Foreign Minister Antonio Rivas (L), and Finance Minister Benigno Lopez, delivers a speech during the first Mercosur Summit held via video conference due to the COVID-19 at the Central Bank headquarters in Asuncion, on July 2, 2020.

Latin America’s COVID-19 Fiasco Is Also a Crisis of Regional Integration

A spat at Mercosur’s 30th birthday marked a low point for regional cooperation.

Pilot at LaGuardia Airport in New York

Biden Needs to End His Staff Travel Ban Now

Only three top State Department officials have been allowed to travel abroad. That’s no way to preserve U.S. interests.

Protesters at a vigil in Myanmar.

Are U.S. and Chinese Interests Really Opposed in Iran and Myanmar?

Beijing is making moves to ensure regional dominance in Southeast Asia and oil supplies from the Middle East. It could be shooting itself in the foot.

Members of the Koglweogo, a self-defense militia, attend an annual gathering in Siguinvousé, Burkina Faso, on Feb 14.

Biden’s Strategy in the Sahel Looks a Lot Like Trump’s

U.S. diplomacy is back in West Africa—but the United States is also back to its old counterterrorism playbook.

Men walk past an improvised monument with the Ethiopian imperial flag.

Ethiopia Needs a Constitutional Convention

Establishing an inclusive reform process could end the country’s stalemate between unitarists and ethnonationalists.

An illustration combining images of Janet Yellen and Mario Draghi.

Janet Yellen and Mario Draghi Have One Last Job

The U.S. treasury secretary and the Italian prime minister have spent decades shaping this economy. But can they control what comes next?

Fighter jets preparing to take off from the flight deck of USS Ronald Reagan aircraft carrier as it sails in South China Sea on its way to Singapore on Oct. 16, 2019.

Great-Power Competition Is a Recipe for Disaster

The latest poorly defined buzzword in Washington is leading pundits and policymakers down a dangerous path.

People from Myanmar living in Taiwan display portraits of deposed Myanmar State Counselor Aung San Suu Kyi at a protest in Taipei on March 21.

Romanticizing Dissidents Plays Into the Hands of Repressive Governments

When it comes to Alexei Navalny and Aung San Suu Kyi, we can’t have it both ways.

Viktor Medvedchuk gives a speech in Ukraine.

Ukraine Cracks Down on Its Own Pro-Russian QAnon

With media bans and treason charges, well-financed conspiracy peddlers are being shut down.

A man and woman carry malnourished children at a camp for Syrians displaced by conflict.

U.S. Sanctions Are Killing Innocent Syrians

The Caesar Act isn’t hurting Assad; it’s harming civilians.

Russian Bitcoin money laundering suspect Alexander Vinnik

Congress Can Do Better to Fight Weaponized Corruption

An understaffed agency vital to U.S. security desperately needs a bigger budget.

Blinken at NATO headquarters in Brussels

Biden Team’s Embrace of Europe Falls Short on Content

Outcomes, not optics, should be the measure of U.S. policy in Europe.

The Russian opposition leader Alexey Navalny and his wife, Yulia Navalnaya, are seen at the passport control point at Moscow's Sheremetyevo Airport on Jan. 17. Russian police detained Navalny at the airport shortly after he landed on a flight from Berlin.

Russian Opposition Leader Navalny Announces Hunger Strike

The Kremlin foe’s health has deteriorated dramatically since being transferred to a brutal penal colony.

Climate change protesters block traffic during a protest to shut down Washington, on Sept. 23, 2019.

COVID-19 Made Sustainable Investments Go Viral

The pandemic has proved the viability of ESG metrics, and the business world may be changed for good.

U.S. President Joe Biden speaks about foreign policy at the State Department in Washington on Feb. 4.

China Wants a ‘Rules-Based International Order,’ Too

The question is who gets to write the codes—and whether the United States will live up to its own.

People wait to receive the Sinopharm vaccine in Hungary.

Russia and China Are Exploiting Europe’s Vaccine Shortfalls

Slovakia’s prime minister has resigned over a secret delivery of Moscow’s Sputnik V as Brussels struggles to keep the EU united.

Supporters of Ugandan opposition leader Robert Kyagulanyi, also known as Bobi Wine, and local and foreign journalists are assaulted by Uganda Military Police outside the U.N. Human Rights Offices in Kampala on Feb. 17.

Is Uganda Returning to the “Dark Days”?

As protesters disappear, Bobi Wine’s opposition is demanding answers from the Museveni regime.

suez ever given ship stuck

Without Shipping, the Global Economy Sinks

The Suez Canal blockade is a reminder that sea freight still keeps the global economy running—and leaders and consumers ignore it at their peril.

A student receives a dose of the China National Biotec Group COVID-19 vaccine.

How I Got Caught Up in the Great Vaccine Race

As China, the United States, and other nations roll out their COVID-19 cures, it’s hard to know where to get the jab.

Mansour Abbas, head of the Israeli party Raam.

An Arab Kingmaker in Israeli Politics?

With election results deadlocked, an Arab-led party is seen as a possible swing faction.

Sri Lankan President Gotabaya Rajapaksa addresses the nation along with army commander Shavendra Silva, navy chief Nishantha Ulugetenne, and air force chief Sudarshana Pathirana during Independence Day celebrations in Colombo on Feb. 4.

The United Nations Turns Up the Heat on Rajapaksa

As Sri Lanka’s human rights record worsens, the world body tries to hold the country accountable for past crimes.

Women wait to receive wheat in Kabul.

Women Cut Out of the Afghan Peace Process

Two decades of progress are threatened by the Taliban return—and a hasty U.S. exit.

A Turkish-made Bayraktar TB2 drone flies at Gecitkale military airbase near Famagusta in the self-proclaimed Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus (TRNC) on December 16, 2019.

The U.S. Army Goes to School on Nagorno-Karabakh Conflict

Off-the-shelf air power changes the battlefield of the future.

Funeral of an Armenian soldier in Yerevan.

Biden Can Help Armenia and Azerbaijan Make Peace. Here’s How.

Four steps Washington can take to facilitate a lasting end to the conflict.

A burnt area of the Amazon rainforest in Brazil.

In Brazil, Vaccine Diplomacy Can Help Save the Climate

Washington should bypass Bolsonaro and open a direct dialogue on Amazon deforestation with local leaders in regions hit hard by COVID-19.

Farmers and workers from the Shiromani Akali Dal party protest against agriculture reforms in Amritsar, India, on Oct. 1, 2020.

India’s Rich Farmers Are Holding Up Reforms Designed to Help the Poor

Don’t listen to the activists. Millions of Indian farmers will benefit from Modi’s new laws.

Young people march against climate change in Uganda.

A Green Africa Is the Key to a Greener World

The United States won’t be a global leader in climate change until it works with African nations.

The General Assembly Hall of the U.N.

The United States Must Pay the United Nations What It Owes

There are few better ways for the country to reclaim its credibility and moral authority.

Protesters wave ethnic flags during a demonstration against the military coup in Myanmar.

Protests Unite Myanmar’s Ethnic Groups Against Common Foe

The shared experience of military violence has shifted political objectives among the ethnic majority.

A Yemeni child with acute malnutrition.

Doctors on the Front Lines of the World’s Worst Humanitarian Crisis 

Director Skye Fitzgerald’s Oscar-nominated documentary “Hunger Ward” chronicles Yemeni health care workers as they wrestle with famine and violence.

A World Health Organization official speaks to health workers in Liberia.

WHO Says COVID-19 Likely Started With Animals, Not Laboratory Leak

The long-awaited report is unlikely to quell concerns about China’s influence over the investigation.

The Global Race To Vaccinate

The Global Race To Vaccinate

Facing new coronavirus variants and threats of backsliding, the world's effort to protect its most vulnerable populations must accelerate

A person wearing a white mask with red tears takes part in a march calling on the European Union to condemn China’s treatment of the Uyghur population in Brussels on April 27, 2018.

China and Europe Are Breaking Over Human Rights

Europe’s leaders want autonomy to strike deals with Beijing, but public outcry over the Uyghurs is forcing their hand.

MB-web-lead-covid-19-global-response-1500x1000

The COVID-19 Global Response Index

From FP Analytics: A country-by-country assessment of government responses to the pandemic.

Truman gives foreign policy address during Cold War.

Biden Revives the Truman Doctrine

His call to wage a global war for freedom echoes the dawn of the Cold War.

Russian pipe-laying vessel near the Nord Stream 2 construction site.

Biden Must Follow the Law and Sanction Nord Stream Now

Why has the administration been so half-hearted on a malign Russian influence project?

Sebastian Kurz and Charles Michel wear face masks.

This Is Europe’s Vaccine Rollout Going According to Plan

Member states are shirking responsibility for the system they designed—even when they’re the primary beneficiaries.

Malaysian politician Anwar Ibrahim waves to his supporters outside the headquarters of the People's Justice Party (PKR) in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia on March 1, 2020

Will It Ever Be Anwar Ibrahim’s Turn?

At 73, Malaysia’s embattled opposition leader has had the top job snatched away from him every time.

Brazilian rescue workers after a mudslide in Rio de Janeiro.

Rio de Janeiro Faces Perfect Storm of Climate Change

Coastal cities need to experiment with different strategies to boost resilience.

A shot from the March 20 episode of Tucker Carlson Tonight.

‘Baizuo’ Is a Chinese Word Conservatives Love

Whether you support Xi or Trump, sneering at progressives is a shared hobby.

U.S. President Joe Biden and U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken attend a virtual meeting with allies.

Biden Looks to Contain China—but Where’s the Asian NATO?

The United States needs a game plan for a continent that’s home to two-thirds of the world’s population and its biggest rival.

The U.S. and Iranian flags are on stage.

How a U.S.-Iran Deal Helps Red States

Republican districts stand to benefit most from the economic windfall that a revived JCPOA would bring.

A photograph of a futuristic cyclist taken in London for the Daily Herald newspaper on Nov. 29, 1933.

Don’t Fear the Future

Americans have to learn to see promise, not threat, ahead again.

Gabi Ashkenazi gives a statement at the Israeli Foreign Ministry.

Has Israel Pushed Realpolitik to Its Limits?

Two new books examine how an isolated state managed to expand its diplomatic horizons.

A group of Jehovah's Witnesses in Massachusetts

Why Is Putin Afraid of Jehovah’s Witnesses?

Since they were labeled an extremist group in 2017, more than 400 have been charged or convicted.

Ambassador to the United Nations Linda Thomas-Greenfield speaks about the pending nominations of key foreign-policy and national security officials.

Biden Takes Small Steps Toward Feminist Foreign Policy

Biden’s push for gender equality is a huge change from Trump, but experts stop short of calling it a feminist foreign policy.

A German flag flutters at the stern of an excursion ship over the container gantry cranes of the Port of Hamburg on Oct. 26, 2018.

We All Live in Germany’s World

How the German government accelerated the 20th century’s economic march toward neoliberalism.

srebrenica genocide memorial

The Wounds of the Bosnian Genocide Haven’t Healed

An Oscar-nominated film exposes the crimes of Srebrenica at a time when the perpetrators are still celebrated in Serbia and beyond.

A woman speaks on a mobile phone as she walks past a graffiti-covered wall with a giant hashtag sign near Kursky railway station in Moscow on Nov. 17, 2017.

Now Russia Has Its Own Ultimatum for Twitter

If Twitter doesn’t remove content Putin dislikes, he’ll ban it. But that will hurt him more than the platform.

Iranian protesters demonstrate outside the Tehran Research Reactor

Europeans Fear Iran Nuclear Window Closing

The Biden administration rebuffed European pleas to lift some sanctions in its first weeks in office.

Children attend the funeral of Rubelsy Tomas Isidro, a Guatemalan migrant murdered alongside 18 other people in the northern Mexican state of Tamaulipas last month, in Comitancillo, Guatemala, on March 13.

Biden Rethinks Central America Strategy

Corrupt local elites thwarted some engagement efforts of the past decade, Biden’s new special envoy wrote.

israel covid haredim protests

Did Israel’s Security State Fail the COVID Test?

Netanyahu’s focus on maintaining ultra-Orthodox support as the pandemic raged didn’t help him win, but it has left deep scars.

Then-Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden

Making Peace With Iran and North Korea Could Be Good for U.S. Workers

Trump tied American jobs to endless wars in the Middle East. Biden should link them to renewed diplomacy.

A representative stands in front of a monitor at Sinopharm CNBG’s COVID-19 vaccine production facility during a media tour in Beijing on Feb. 26.

At China’s Borders, “Vaccine Passports” Just Got Real

In announcing it would prioritize travelers who had received Chinese-made vaccines, Beijing sparked outrage in countries where those aren’t available.

Afghan President Ashraf Ghani and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi wave prior to a meeting in New Delhi on Sept. 14, 2016.

India Joins the Afghan Peace Negotiations

Long sidelined by Islamabad, Moscow, and Beijing, New Delhi is finally taking a seat at the table.

israel religious secular idf protest

How Liberals Lost in Israel

The decline of Israeli democracy holds lessons for the United States.

A family walks past the Federal Office for Migration and Refugees.

Are Europe’s Syrians Still Refugees?

The migrants who fled the Syrian war now want real membership in their new home countries.

Indian Army Gen. Jagjit Singh Aurora and Pakistani Army Gen. Amir Abdullah Khan Niazi sign the surrender document that would end the war between the two countries and lead to the creation of Bangladesh, in Dhaka on Dec. 16, 1971.

50 Years After Independence, Bangladesh Bursts Into Geopolitics

The country is on the cusp of a second liberation—one that would end its relative isolation.

Chinese President Xi Jinping attends the National People’s Congress.

Beijing’s Schadenfreude Over the Capitol Riots Conceals Deep Anxiety

China’s elite are nervous about the coming succession crisis around Xi Jinping.

Load 10 More Articles