Q&A

What in the World?

In this edition of FP’s weekly international news quiz: European soccer drama, digital currency in China, and global leaders’ vaccination selfies.

By , a deputy copy editor at Foreign Policy.
Fans of Chelsea Football Club protest against the European Super League.
Fans of Chelsea Football Club protest against the European Super League in London on April 20. Rob Pinney/Getty Images

Are you a global news buff? Take our quiz to test your knowledge of the latest world events.


Are you a global news buff? Take our quiz to test your knowledge of the latest world events.


1. This week, some of the world’s richest and most popular soccer clubs proposed the formation of a European Super League, which drew immediate condemnation from fans and politicians. Which was the first team to officially abandon the plan amid the outcry?

(A) Chelsea
(B) Real Madrid
(C) Manchester City
(D) D.C. United

2. Saudi Arabia and Iran—regional foes—haven’t spoken in years. But this week, reports emerged that officials from both countries have been conducting direct talks in Baghdad in the hope of warming relations. When did Saudi Arabia and Iran cut diplomatic ties?

(A) 2016
(B) 2001
(C) 1993
(D) 1979

3. Facing pressure from both administration officials and the general public, the Biden White House reversed its decision not to lift the cap on refugee admissions imposed by its predecessor. What is the current annual cap, set under former U.S. President Donald Trump?

(A) 500,000 people
(B) 50,000 people
(C) 15,000 people
(D) 1,000 people

4. China is introducing a new virtual currency, commonly referred to as the “digital yuan.” What is the currency’s official name?

(A) Bitebi
(B) People’s Reserve Digital Currency
(C) Chinacoin
(D) Digital Currency Electronic Payment

5. Germany will vote for a new chancellor this September. Whom did outgoing German Chancellor Angela Merkel’s Christian Democratic Union party recently choose as its candidate?

(A) Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer
(B) Armin Laschet
(C) Markus Söder
(D) Friedrich Merz

6. This week, former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin was convicted of murdering George Floyd. Police in the United States killed 1,099 people in 2019, by far the most police killings of any democratic country. Which country had the second-most, with 36 people killed by police?

(A) Germany
(B) Japan
(C) Canada
(D) Australia

7. Chadian President Idriss Déby—one of Africa’s longest-ruling political leaders—died unexpectedly this week. How long had Déby been in power?

(A) 30 years
(B) 44 years
(C) 27 years
(D) 18 years

8. The Association of Southeast Asian Nations is gathering for an in-person meeting in Jakarta, Indonesia, this weekend. The group has been criticized for inviting the leader of Myanmar’s recent military coup to participate. Who is this controversial invitee?

(A) Aung San Suu Kyi
(B) Min Aung Hlaing
(C) Mya Tun Oo
(D) Soe Win

9. As the coronavirus pandemic rages on, one annual British competition is silencing its usually vocal contestants, having them submit written entries instead. What is this now-muffled event?

(A) The Slam Poetry Finals
(B) The World Championship of Public Speaking
(C) The Pro Heckling Tournament
(D) The Town Crier Championships

10. Though Russian President Vladimir Putin won’t reveal which COVID-19 vaccine he received, some world leaders are publicizing their injections, in the hope of encouraging citizens to get inoculated themselves. Can you match the politicians to the vaccine they received?

Names: Andrés Manuel López Obrador, Joe Biden, Angela Merkel, Benjamin Netanyahu, Alberto Fernández, Narendra Modi, Joko Widodo, Moon Jae-in, King Salman, Cyril Ramaphosa, Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Vaccines: AstraZeneca, AstraZeneca, AstraZeneca, Covaxin, Johnson & Johnson, Pfizer-BioNTech, Pfizer-BioNTech, Pfizer-BioNTech, Sinovac, Sinovac, Sputnik V


Answers:

1. (C) Manchester City
2. (A) 2016
3. (C) 15,000 people
4. (D) Digital Currency Electronic Payment
5. (B) Armin Laschet
6. (C) Canada
7. (A) 30 years
8. (B) Min Aung Hlaing
9. (D) The Town Crier Championships
10.

Names: Andrés Manuel López Obrador, Joe Biden, Angela Merkel, Benjamin Netanyahu, Alberto Fernández, Narendra Modi, Joko Widodo, Moon Jae-in, King Salman, Cyril Ramaphosa, Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Vaccines, respectively: AstraZeneca, Pfizer-BioNTech, AstraZeneca, Pfizer-BioNTech, Sputnik V, Covaxin, Sinovac, AstraZeneca, Pfizer-BioNTech, Johnson & Johnson, Sinovac


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Have feedback? Email whatintheworld@foreignpolicy.com to let me know your thoughts.

Nina Goldman is a deputy copy editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @goldmannk