Q&A

What in the World?

This week in FP’s international news quiz: Vaccine incentives, Israeli-Palestinian conflict, and a major vote in Chile.

By , a deputy copy editor at Foreign Policy.
An election service worker seals a ballot box in Santiago, Chile.
An election service worker seals a ballot box in Santiago, Chile, on May 13. CLAUDIO REYES/AFP via Getty Images

Are you up to date? Take our weekly quiz to test your knowledge of the latest world news.


1. The new wave of Israeli-Palestinian violence has centered on the potential forced eviction of Palestinians from their homes in a predominantly Palestinian part of Israeli-occupied East Jerusalem. What is the name of this neighborhood?

(A) Sheikh Jarrah
(B) Shuafat
(C) Sur Baher
(D) Beit Hanina

2. The United States blocked a joint statement at the United Nations Security Council calling for an end to fighting between Israelis and Palestinians. Of the 15 countries on the council, how many were in support of the statement?

(A) 11
(B) 13
(C) 14
(D) 9

3. After the 2019 Christchurch mosque shooting, New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern spearheaded an international summit to fight online extremism. Who is Ardern’s co-chair for the summit, known as the Christchurch Call, which met this week?

(A) Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison
(B) U.S. President Joe Biden
(C) Finnish President Sauli Niinisto
(D) French President Emmanuel Macron

4. Chile votes this weekend to elect members of a constituent assembly, who will be tasked with writing a new constitution. The current Chilean Constitution was written in 1980 under which dictator?

(A) Fulgencio Batista
(B) Augusto Pinochet
(C) Rafael Trujillo
(D) Jorge Rafael Videla

5. Nepali Prime Minister K.P. Sharma Oli lost a parliamentary vote of confidence this week amid a massive coronavirus surge. Who was appointed as the country’s next prime minister on Thursday?

(A) Bidya Devi Bhandari
(B) Pushpa Kamal Dahal
(C) Rishi Kattel
(D) K.P. Sharma Oli

6. Armenia’s acting prime minister, Nikol Pashinyan, accused which country of an act of “subversive infiltration” into Armenia’s territory on Thursday?

(A) Georgia
(B) Turkey
(C) Iran
(D) Azerbaijan

7. Various global supply shortages are curtailing production in the international car industry. Which component is not currently in short stock?

(A) Rubber
(B) Headlights
(C) Seat foam
(D) Computer chips

8. Which country’s hackers has the Biden administration accused of shutting down a crucial pipeline in the eastern United States, which set off a run on gasoline?

(A) China
(B) Iran
(C) North Korea
(D) Russia

9. Iran’s presidential election campaign has begun ahead of voting in June, and former leader Mahmoud Ahmadinejad has thrown his hat back into the ring.

In his years out of office, the former president has become active on Twitter, posting in English and frequently referencing popular culture. Which Tupac Shakur lyric has not appeared in an Ahmadinejad tweet?

(A) “I got love for my brother, but we can never go nowhere / Unless we share with each other.”
(B) “‘It’s time to fight back,’ that’s what Huey said / Two shots in the dark, now Huey’s dead.”
(C) “They got money for wars, but can’t feed the poor.”
(D) “There’s war in the streets and war in the Middle East / Instead of war on poverty.”

10. The incentives for getting a COVID-19 vaccine keep growing. In the United States, Ohio is launching a $1 million vaccine lottery, the New York Yankees and Mets are giving out free tickets for those who get a dose at their stadiums, and Illinois is offering free passes to Six Flags theme parks for those who get vaccinated on-site.

The United States is hardly the only country to woo its citizens with vaccine-linked rewards. Which of the following international vaccine promotions is real?

(A) The Romanian castle said to be the inspiration for the title character’s home in Bram Stoker’s Dracula is offering free entry to an exhibit on torture implements for those who get vaccinated at the site.
(B) Thrill-seeking Ukrainians can get their jabs at the eerie abandoned hospital at Chernobyl, which is usually off-limits to visitors.
(C) Want a vaccine with a view? The iconic Tokyo Tower is offering a free ride to the top, where the local health department has established a vaccine clinic.
(D) With cases spiking in the major tourist destination of Cancún, Mexico, over 70 local bars and restaurants have collaborated to offer a discount card for vaccinated visitors, in hopes that travelers will get their shots before they hit the beach.


Answers:

1. (A) Sheikh Jarrah
2. (C) 14. The Foreign Policy news team reported this week on America’s political isolation at the U.N.
3. (D) French President Emmanuel Macron
4. (B) Augusto Pinochet
5. (D) K.P. Sharma Oli. The ousted prime minister was reappointed after his opponents failed to form a majority government by the deadline.
6. (D) Azerbaijan
7. (B) Headlights
8. (D) Russia
9. (A) “I got love for my brother, but we can never go nowhere / Unless we share with each other.”
10. (A) The Romanian castle said to be the inspiration for the title character’s home in Bram Stoker’s Dracula is offering free entry to an exhibit on torture implements for those who get vaccinated at the site.


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Nina Goldman is a deputy copy editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @goldmannk