What in the World?

This week in FP’s international news quiz: Ethiopia votes, and global vaccine efforts meet variant scares.

By , a deputy copy editor at Foreign Policy.
Electoral officials count ballots in front of electoral observers at a polling station in Bahir Dar, Ethiopia, on June 22.
Electoral officials count ballots in front of electoral observers at a polling station in Bahir Dar, Ethiopia, on June 22.
Electoral officials count ballots in front of electoral observers at a polling station in Bahir Dar, Ethiopia, on June 22. EDUARDO SOTERAS/AFP via Getty Images

Think you know what in the world went on this week? Test yourself with our international news quiz!


1. Which pro-democracy newspaper in Hong Kong printed its final issue this week, after authorities raided the publication’s office and arrested executives?

(A) Apple Daily
(B) China Daily
(C) South China Morning Post
(D) The Epoch Times

2. Ethiopia held parliamentary elections this week, but only some Ethiopians could get to the polls as voting was delayed in several regional states due to logistical issues and violent conflict.

Think you know what in the world went on this week? Test yourself with our international news quiz!


1. Which pro-democracy newspaper in Hong Kong printed its final issue this week, after authorities raided the publication’s office and arrested executives?

(A) Apple Daily
(B) China Daily
(C) South China Morning Post
(D) The Epoch Times

2. Ethiopia held parliamentary elections this week, but only some Ethiopians could get to the polls as voting was delayed in several regional states due to logistical issues and violent conflict.

In which regional state were voters able to cast their ballots on Election Day?

(A) Tigray
(B) Amhara
(C) Harar
(D) Somali

3. On Monday, Swedish Prime Minister Stefan Lofven became the country’s first premier ousted in a no-confidence vote. Which issue was at the center of the controversy that drove his exit?

(A) Refugee admissions
(B) Public school curricula
(C) China policy
(D) Rent control

4. A major United Nations conference on Libya was held this week in which city?

(A) Rome
(B) Berlin
(C) Los Angeles
(D) Dubai

5. Iran’s new president-elect, Ebrahim Raisi, is seen as a potential successor to the country’s supreme leader. Who currently holds the top job?

(A) Ruhollah Khomeini
(B) Mahmoud Ahmadinejad
(C) Ali Khamenei
(D) Esmail Qaani

6. The World Health Organization said this week it will establish a “technology transfer hub” to ramp up COVID-19 vaccine production in which African country?

(A) South Africa
(B) Ghana
(C) Kenya
(D) Mozambique

7. As Latin America struggles with high COVID-19 case numbers, which country in the region reported this week that its own vaccine, named Abdala, is about 92 percent effective after three doses?

(A) Brazil
(B) Cuba
(C) Mexico
(D) Chile

8. There’s a new coronavirus variant causing concern among health experts and politicians—and it now accounts for around 90 percent of all new COVID-19 cases in the United Kingdom, where more than 80 percent of the adult population has received at least one vaccine dose.

What is the variant’s name?

(A) Alpha
(B) Delta
(C) Lambda
(D) Zeta

9. Which late political leader is now on track to become a saint—if the Roman Catholic Church can confirm evidence of miracle-working in their extensive CV?

(A) Argentine President Carlos Menem
(B) French Prime Minister Robert Schuman
(C) Philippine President Corazon Aquino
(D) U.S. President John F. Kennedy

10. According to a report in the Guardian, the European Union is concerned that airing too many TV shows and movies from which country poses a threat to the bloc’s “cultural diversity”?

(A) The United Kingdom
(B) South Korea
(C) China
(D) The United States


Answers:

1. (A) Apple Daily
2. (B) Amhara
3. (D) Rent control
4. (B) Berlin
5. (C) Ali Khamenei
6. (A) South Africa
7. (B) Cuba
8. (B) Delta
9. (B) French Prime Minister Robert Schuman. A French politician who helped found the European Union and NATO, the saint-in-waiting is considered the “Father of Europe.”
10. (A) The United Kingdom


How did you score?

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6-9: Great job! Now, dig deeper by subscribing to Foreign Policy’s one-stop regional newsletters: Africa Brief, China Brief, Latin America Brief, and South Asia Brief.

10: Perfection! You’re a pro who needs the in-depth insights offered in Situation Report, our newsletter on national security and defense.


Have feedback? Email whatintheworld@foreignpolicy.com to let me know your thoughts.

Nina Goldman is a deputy copy editor at Foreign Policy.

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