What in the World?

This week in FP’s international news quiz: Olympics preparations, diplomatic visits, and the rise of TV presidents.

By , a deputy copy editor at Foreign Policy.
The 2020 Olympics beach volleyball stadium
The 2020 Olympics beach volleyball stadium
The 2020 Olympics beach volleyball stadium on July 16. Carl Court/Getty Images

What has the world been up to this week? Test yourself with Foreign Policy’s weekly international news quiz!


1. Which city entered a new state of emergency this week to prevent the spread of COVID-19 as it prepares to host this year’s (delayed) Olympic Games?

(A) Rome
(B) Beijing
(C) Tokyo
(D) Athens

2. White House climate envoy John Kerry traveled to Russia this week to meet with the country’s foreign minister ahead of a key climate change conference in the United Kingdom. Who is Russia’s top diplomat?

What has the world been up to this week? Test yourself with Foreign Policy’s weekly international news quiz!


1. Which city entered a new state of emergency this week to prevent the spread of COVID-19 as it prepares to host this year’s (delayed) Olympic Games?

(A) Rome
(B) Beijing
(C) Tokyo
(D) Athens

2. White House climate envoy John Kerry traveled to Russia this week to meet with the country’s foreign minister ahead of a key climate change conference in the United Kingdom. Who is Russia’s top diplomat?

(A) Mikhail Mishustin
(B) Sergei Shoigu
(C) Sergey Lavrov
(D) Olga Lyubimova

3. Protests against the imprisonment of former South African President Jacob Zuma have escalated, centering in which of the country’s provinces?

(A) Western Cape
(B) KwaZulu-Natal
(C) Limpopo
(D) North West

4. In Cuba, protesters took to the streets this week in rare anti-government demonstrations amid dire food and medical shortages.

The United States is facing international pressure to lift its trade embargo on the island nation, while some U.S. politicians argue the ban is necessary to exert pressure on the communist government. For how many years has the economic embargo been in place?

(A) 19
(B) 32
(C) 47
(D) 59

5. Which world leader visited U.S. President Joe Biden at the White House this week?

(A) Chinese President Xi Jinping
(B) Argentine President Alberto Fernández
(C) Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison
(D) German Chancellor Angela Merkel

6. One of the suspects arrested in connection with Haitian President Jovenel Moïse’s assassination was an informant for which U.S. government agency?

(A) CIA
(B) National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency
(C) FBI
(D) Drug Enforcement Administration

7. Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro was admitted to the hospital this week with what condition?

(A) Itchy toes
(B) Persistent hiccups
(C) A stomachache
(D) Shin splints

8. Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri resigned this week after failing to form a government. Replacing him may be difficult, in part because Lebanon’s sectarian system requires the role of prime minister to be filled by a member of which religious group?

(A) Christians
(B) Druze
(C) Shiite Muslims
(D) Sunni Muslims

9. In Bulgaria’s parliamentary election last weekend, the party led by Slavi Trifonov—a television host and musician—gained a plurality of votes. While Trifonov faces an uphill battle to form a government, he is far from the first small-screen star to seek high political office.

Which country has not seen a former TV host or actor ascend to the presidency?

(A) Ukraine
(B) Mozambique
(C) Guatemala
(D) The United States

10. What new rule are South Korean gyms imposing to reduce the spread of COVID-19?

(A) No high-tempo songs in group exercise classes, to prevent excessive breathing
(B) No drinking water or other beverages while working out
(C) No weights under 25 pounds, to encourage short, high-intensity workouts
(D) No dating anyone who exercises at the same gym


Answers:

1. (C) Tokyo
2. (C) Sergey Lavrov
3. (B) KwaZulu-Natal
4. (D) 59
5. (D) German Chancellor Angela Merkel
6. (D) Drug Enforcement Administration
7. (B) Persistent hiccups
8. (D) Sunni Muslims
9. (B) Mozambique. TV stars-turned-world leaders include Ukraine’s Volodymyr Zelensky, Guatemala’s Jimmy Morales, and the United States’ Donald Trump.
10. (A) No high-tempo songs in group exercise classes, to prevent excessive breathing


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Have feedback? Email whatintheworld@foreignpolicy.com to let me know your thoughts.

Nina Goldman is a deputy copy editor at Foreign Policy.

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