What in the World?

This week in FP’s international news quiz: attacks in Afghanistan, the ongoing impacts of COVID-19, and rule by decree around the world.

By , a deputy copy editor at Foreign Policy.
Afghan refugees arrive in Virginia
Afghan refugees arrive in Virginia
Afghan refugees board buses that will take them to a processing center after being evacuated from Kabul at Washington Dulles International Airport in Dulles, Virginia, on Aug. 27. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Were your eyes glued to the news this week? Test your knowledge with our weekly international news quiz.

Have feedback? Email whatintheworld@foreignpolicy.com to let me know your thoughts.

Were your eyes glued to the news this week? Test your knowledge with our weekly international news quiz.


1. What is the name of the Islamic State affiliate that on Thursday conducted an attack on the Kabul airport, where desperate crowds were waiting, hoping to leave Afghanistan?

Read more: Sajjan M. Gohel unpacks the Islamic State-Khorasan’s tricky relationship with the Taliban.


2. Among those seeking to leave Afghanistan after the Taliban takeover are Afghans who worked with the United States during its two-decade occupation of the country. Many of them are eligible for U.S. visas through the special immigrant visa (SIV) program. But that’s easier said than done.

How big is the SIV backlog?

Read more: Foreign Policy’s Kelly Kimball and Robbie Gramer examine why the special immigration system is broken.


3. The airport explosions forced U.S. President Joe Biden to delay his planned meeting with which world leader?

Read Oren Kessler’s profile of Bennett, Israel’s first religious prime minister.


4. The G-7 held an emergency meeting this week to address the situation in Afghanistan. Which country is not a member of the group?

But China still has deep interests in Afghanistan. Read Derek Grossman’s analysis of why Chinese recognition of the Taliban government is all but inevitable.


5. Qatar recently set a date for its first legislative elections—ever. Which of the following countries has similarly had an entirely appointed legislature for most of its history?


6. On Monday, Tunisian President Kais Saied extended his suspension of the country’s parliament—for how much longer?

Public opinion about Saied is deeply divided. Hasan Ismaik argues that the Tunisian president is just doing his best to stamp out corruption. Others, like Foreign Policy’s Michael Hirsh, are sounding alarm bells.


7. French President Emmanuel Macron met with Ireland’s heads of state and government on Thursday. What Irish-language title is used for the country’s equivalent of a prime minister?


8. Which Asian country became the first major economy in the region to raise interest rates since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic this week?


9. What new use are Japanese authorities considering for Tokyo-area sports venues after the Olympics and Paralympics?

Read David Clay Large’s argument for building a permanent home for the Olympics.


10. A well-known gated community in Argentina made headlines this week over what neighborhood drama?

A capybara is seen on the shore of Laguna de los Padres, near Mar del Plata, Argentina, on May 8, 2020.

On social media, some Argentines have rallied behind the capybaras, celebrating them as fighters on the front lines of the country’s class struggle.

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Have feedback? Email whatintheworld@foreignpolicy.com to let me know your thoughts.

Nina Goldman is a deputy copy editor at Foreign Policy.

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