What in the World?

This week in FP’s international news quiz: summits galore, a princess in flight, and a real “Great Pumpkin.”

By , a deputy copy editor at Foreign Policy.
A forklift moves a giant pumpkin to the scale at the New England Giant Pumpkin Weigh-Off at the Topsfield Fair in Topsfield, Massachusetts, on Oct. 1.
A forklift moves a giant pumpkin to the scale at the New England Giant Pumpkin Weigh-Off at the Topsfield Fair in Topsfield, Massachusetts, on Oct. 1.
A forklift moves a giant pumpkin to the scale at the New England Giant Pumpkin Weigh-Off at the Topsfield Fair in Topsfield, Massachusetts, on Oct. 1. JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP via Getty Images

See if you’re up to speed on international news with our weekly quiz!

Have feedback? Email whatintheworld@foreignpolicy.com to let me know your thoughts.

See if you’re up to speed on international news with our weekly quiz!


1. This weekend, the annual G-20 summit will take place in which city?


2. Immediately after, leaders will travel to Glasgow, Scotland, for the United Nations’ major climate change conference, more commonly known as what?


3. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau reshuffled his cabinet this week. Which former foreign minister did he keep on in her current roles as deputy prime minister and finance minister?

From the archives: In 2018, Freeland won FP’s Diplomat of the Year award. “The truth is that authoritarianism is on the march. It’s time for liberal democracy to fight back,” she said in her acceptance speech. “To do that, we need to raise our game.”


4. Which NATO member state threatened to expel ambassadors from 10 countries, including the United States, France, and Germany, last weekend?

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan eventually backed down from the threats. His economy, however, continues to be in hot water. Writing in FP, Umit Ozlale and Selim Sazak, members of Turkey’s Iyi (Good) Party, explain how Turkey’s opposition can bring the country back from the brink.


5. Sudan’s prime minister, Abdalla Hamdok, was detained in a coup on Monday. Gen. Mohamed Hamdan Dagalo, one of the leaders behind the coup, is better known by what nom de guerre?

FP’s Robbie Gramer and Colum Lynch detail how negotiations to prevent a military takeover faltered.


6. U.S. President Joe Biden, who is Catholic, met with Pope Francis at the Vatican this week. How many Catholic presidents has the United States had?

The other president was John F. Kennedy. After Biden’s election, FP’s Amy Mackinnon and Colm Quinn wrote the president’s “Irish roots and Catholic faith are a cornerstone of his self-identity.”


7. Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro faces an uphill reelection battle next year, with many senators calling for his indictment after an explosive probe detailed alleged crimes against humanity in his coronavirus response.

Nevertheless, Bolsonaro received a rousing endorsement this week from which influential figure?


8. Egypt lifted a state of emergency on Monday that had been in place for how many years?

Emergency measures were imposed in April 2017 after a pair of bombings at Coptic churches killed dozens of people. They had been repeatedly renewed in the years since.


9. Japan’s Princess Mako plans to leave her country—and royal status—behind after taking what controversial action this week?


10. As Americans gear up for Halloween, a farmer from which country broke the world record for growing the largest pumpkin ever at more than 2,700 pounds?

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Have feedback? Email whatintheworld@foreignpolicy.com to let me know your thoughts.

Nina Goldman is a deputy copy editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @goldmannk

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