What in the World?

This week in FP’s international news quiz: Diplomats visit Russia, elections begin in India, and protests overwhelm the streets of Canada.

By , a deputy copy editor at Foreign Policy.
British Foreign Secretary Liz Truss and Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov
British Foreign Secretary Liz Truss and Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov
British Foreign Secretary Liz Truss and Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov hold a joint press conference in Moscow on Feb. 10. Russian Foreign Ministry/Handout/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

What in the world has gone on this week? Test how much you can remember with our weekly news quiz!

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Have feedback? Email whatintheworld@foreignpolicy.com to let me know your thoughts.

What in the world has gone on this week? Test how much you can remember with our weekly news quiz!

Subscribe here to get a new “What in the World?” in your inbox every week.


1. As tensions between Russia and Ukraine mount, which world leader paid both countries’ presidents a visit this week?

Macron is aiming to assert his status as a leader of Europe, J. Alex Tarquinio writes.


2. In a meeting on Thursday between British Foreign Secretary Liz Truss and her Russian counterpart, Sergey Lavrov, Truss said the United Kingdom “will never recognize Russian sovereignty” over which two regions?

The British foreign secretary fell for a trick question from Lavrov: Rostov and Voronezh are formally recognized Russian oblasts, not disputed regions. Last year, FP’s Amy Mackinnon profiled Truss as she stepped into her new role as the face of “Global Britain.”


3. Libya’s prime minister survived an alleged assassination attempt on Thursday amid a contentious government succession process. What is his name?


4. Key elections began this week in which Indian state—the country’s most populous?

For more on the Uttar Pradesh elections, check out this week’s edition of FP’s South Asia Brief.


5. Which country’s new chancellor visited the White House for the first time on Monday?

Read why FP’s Stephen M. Walt thinks Germany would win the gold medal for foreign policy.


6. Where is U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken stopping this weekend en route from Australia to Hawaii?

Blinken’s stopover marks the first time a U.S. secretary of state has visited Fiji since 1985.


7. Peruvian President Pedro Castillo swore in a new cabinet this week. How many cabinets has Castillo had since taking office last July?


8. Iceland announced last week it will move toward shutting down its whaling industry. In which two other countries is whaling still legal?


9. Which city (hint: Canada’s capital) continues to be disrupted by mass protests over vaccine mandates?

Taylor C. Noakes explains why far-right hate symbols have made an appearance at the demonstrations.


10. This week, one major social media company threatened to pull out of Europe due to the European Union’s tech regulations. In response, Germany’s vice chancellor said he had “lived without” the company’s platform “for four years, and life has been fantastic” while France’s finance minister argued, “we would live very well without” it.

What is the social media platform in question?

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Have feedback? Email whatintheworld@foreignpolicy.com to let me know your thoughts.

Nina Goldman is a deputy copy editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @goldmannk

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