What in the World?

This week in FP’s international news quiz: France votes, Sri Lanka protests, and Russia gets the boot at the United Nations.

By , a deputy copy editor at Foreign Policy.
Buddhist monks and university students protest in Sri Lanka.
Buddhist monks and university students protest in Sri Lanka.
Buddhist monks along with university students take part in a demonstration against the economic crisis near the parliament building in Colombo, Sri Lanka, on April 8. ISHARA S. KODIKARA/AFP via Getty Images

What in the world has gone on this week? See what you can remember with our weekly international news quiz!

Have feedback? Email whatintheworld@foreignpolicy.com to let me know your thoughts.

What in the world has gone on this week? See what you can remember with our weekly international news quiz!


1. Which candidate is polling second going into the first round of France’s presidential elections on Sunday?

After losing handily to Emmanuel Macron in 2017, the far-right Le Pen is now closing the gap against the centrist incumbent president, FP’s James Traub writes.


2. Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky held talks with the president of the European Commission on Friday. What is her name?


3. In what country does President Andrés Manuel López Obrador face a recall vote on Sunday?

The vote is largely seen as an effort by the president to mobilize his own supporters, and it is not expected to remove him from office.


4. Kuwait’s prime minister and his entire cabinet resigned on Tuesday. How many collective cabinet resignations of this sort has the country seen in the past year and a half?


5. Further east, protesters are demanding the resignation of Sri Lankan President Gotabaya Rajapaksa as the country faces a massive economic crisis, which is driven in part by high levels of government debt. What was Sri Lanka’s debt-to-GDP ratio in 2021?


6. Which country, meanwhile, has the highest debt-to-GDP ratio in the world, topping 250 percent last year?


7. On Thursday, the United Nations General Assembly voted to suspend Russia from which body?

The move represents a stunning international rebuke of Russia’s actions in Ukraine, FP’s Colum Lynch reports.


8. Last week, the United States returned two looted antiquities—together valued at $500,000—to Libya. What museum previously displayed one of the repatriated pieces?

The piece in question is a bust of a veiled woman that was reportedly looted from a tomb in Libya and made its way to New York, where it had been on display at the Metropolitan Museum of Art since 1998. The repatriation of African art is long overdue, FP’s Nosmot Gbadamosi wrote in 2020.


9. Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan continues to resist efforts by his political opposition to remove him from office, with the cricketer-turned-politician tweeting that he would “fight … till the last ball.”

Khan was a renowned bowler and batsman in his cricketing days. What kind of bowling was he known for?


10. A British charity is seeking applicants for jobs at the world’s most remote post office. Where will these distant postmasters be based?

The postmasters’ job duties also include counting penguins, the BBC reported.

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Have feedback? Email whatintheworld@foreignpolicy.com to let me know your thoughts.

Nina Goldman is a deputy copy editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @goldmannk

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