What in the World?

This week in FP’s international news quiz: no-confidence votes, NATO enlargement, and flying food.

By , a deputy copy editor at Foreign Policy.
Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf party supporters take part in a pro-Imran Khan rally.
Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf party supporters take part in a pro-Imran Khan rally.
Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf party supporters of dismissed Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan take part in a rally in Peshawar, Pakistan, on April 10. ABDUL MAJEED/AFP via Getty Images

What in the world has gone on this week? See what you can remember with our weekly international news quiz!

Have feedback? Email whatintheworld@foreignpolicy.com to let me know your thoughts.

What in the world has gone on this week? See what you can remember with our weekly international news quiz!


1. On Monday, Pakistan voted in an interim prime minister after then-Prime Minister Imran Khan lost a no-confidence vote on April 9. Who is Khan’s replacement?


2. Elsewhere in South Asia, Sri Lanka’s opposition alliance has threatened a no-confidence vote against Prime Minister Mahinda Rajapaksa and President Gotabaya Rajapaksa. What is the name of the opposition alliance?


3. Which European country on Monday became the first to send its leader to Moscow to meet with Russian President Vladimir Putin since Russia’s Feb. 24 invasion of Ukraine?


4. Two countries held so-called 2+2 dialogues this week to further their strategic partnership. Which countries were they?

Shivshankar Menon, India’s former national security advisor and former foreign secretary, told FP’s Ravi Agrawal that the United States and India’s “robust” relationship is “not going to be determined by what happens in Ukraine. This is a relationship that has survived pretty drastic changes of government in both countries.”


5. Russia’s war in Ukraine is causing severe economic crises in both countries. According to the World Bank, Ukraine’s GDP is expected to drop by how much this year?


6. On Tuesday, U.S. President Joe Biden accused Putin of committing genocide in Ukraine. Which country has the United States not officially condemned for genocide?

The United States’ most recent designation of genocide accused Myanmar’s government of systematically killing its Rohingya population. International bodies now need to take action to stop the violence, Rohingya activist Wai Wai Nu argues.


7. Which two European nations publicly stated their intention to seriously consider joining NATO on Wednesday?

Finland’s and Sweden’s membership in the alliance would significantly alter Northern Europe’s security landscape and could tilt the balance of power against Putin, FP’s Michael Hirsh writes.


8. British Prime Minister Boris Johnson on Thursday announced a plan to relocate some U.K.-bound migrants to a different country to process their asylum claims. Which country has agreed to host them?


9. A Turkish restaurant tried and failed to send a plate of its signature dish to space to promote its business and local community. What popular food almost went interstellar?

Although the stratosphere proved too much for the Turkish dish, the restaurant owner blamed other conditions. “I think aliens sent it back because it had too much pepper,” he joked. “I will send a dish with less pepper next time.”


10. The Brazilian newspaper Folha de S.Paulo was forced to issue a retraction after it printed news of the death of a noted individual who hadn’t died. Which unlucky person got to see their obituary a bit too early?

According to the newspaper, the queen’s cause of death was “XXXXXXXX.” Very specific.

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Have feedback? Email whatintheworld@foreignpolicy.com to let me know your thoughts.

Alexandra Sharp is a deputy copy editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @AlexandraSSharp

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