What in the World?

This week in FP’s international news quiz: The U.N. weighs its options in Ukraine, Elon Musk moves to buy Twitter, and Turkey’s foreign minister tours Latin America.

By , a deputy copy editor at Foreign Policy.
Colombian Foreign Minister Marta Lucía Ramírez and Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu laugh together
Colombian Foreign Minister Marta Lucía Ramírez and Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu laugh together
Colombian Foreign Minister Marta Lucía Ramírez and Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu deliver a press conference during his official visit in Bogotá on April 25. RAUL ARBOLEDA/AFP via Getty Images

Are you up to date? Test your international news knowledge with our weekly quiz!

Have feedback? Email whatintheworld@foreignpolicy.com to let me know your thoughts.

Are you up to date? Test your international news knowledge with our weekly quiz!


1. As the United States ramps up efforts to aid Ukraine, whom did U.S. President Joe Biden announce on Monday as his nominee for U.S. ambassador to Kyiv?

Brink is expected to be confirmed quickly to the post, which has sat vacant for almost three years, FP’s Robbie Gramer reports.


2. What did Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky criticize United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres for this week?

“It would be logical to go first to Ukraine, to see the people there, the consequences of the occupation,” Zelensky said.

FP’s Colum Lynch details how the U.N. secretary-general is cautiously stepping into a peacemaker role in the Russia-Ukraine conflict.


3. Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu took a whirlwind tour of Latin America this week, visiting Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Panama, Uruguay, and Venezuela.

While the foreign minister doesn’t speak Spanish or Portuguese, he is something of a polyglot. Which language does Cavusoglu not speak?


4. Which currency did Israel add to its foreign exchange reserves for the first time this month, in what it described as a change in “philosophy”?

Israel also added the Japanese yen, Australian dollar, and Canadian dollar to its reserves in an effort to diversify away from the U.S. dollar and the euro.


5. According to new data from the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute, global military spending hit a milestone in 2021, surpassing what mark for the first time?


6. Of all military spending worldwide last year, what percentage came from the United States?

The United States is the world’s biggest military spender, followed by China, which accounts for an estimated 14 percent of the global total.


7. South Africa marked Freedom Day on Wednesday, celebrating the anniversary of what landmark 1994 event?

The 1994 elections were the first time South Africans of all races were allowed to vote.


8. Which two countries are expected to announce their intention to join NATO within the next few weeks?

After long asserting it had no reason to join NATO, Sweden is now expected to follow Finland into the alliance, FP’s Elisabeth Braw writes.


9. The tech billionaire Elon Musk struck a deal this week to buy Twitter for a whopping $44 billion. Which country’s GDP amounts to a roughly equivalent sum?

Cameroon, Bolivia, and Latvia, along with dozens of other countries, have GDPs lower than the dollar amount Musk is dropping to buy the social media platform.


10. Which country broke a Guinness World Record this week by having nearly 80,000 people congregated in one place wave national flags at the same time?

The Indian flag-wavers surpassed the record previously set by patriots across the border in Pakistan.

You scored

It’s a big world out there! Brush up on global goings-on by subscribing to Morning Brief, Foreign Policy’s flagship daily newsletter.

You scored

Great job! Now, dig deeper by subscribing to Foreign Policy’s one-stop regional newsletters: Africa Brief, China Brief, Latin America Brief, and South Asia Brief.

You scored

Perfection! You’re a pro who needs the in-depth insights offered in Situation Report, our newsletter on national security and defense.


Have feedback? Email whatintheworld@foreignpolicy.com to let me know your thoughts.

Nina Goldman is a deputy copy editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @goldmannk

Join the Conversation

Commenting on this and other recent articles is just one benefit of a Foreign Policy subscription.

Already a subscriber? .

Join the Conversation

Join the conversation on this and other recent Foreign Policy articles when you subscribe now.

Not your account?

Join the Conversation

Please follow our comment guidelines, stay on topic, and be civil, courteous, and respectful of others’ beliefs. Comments are closed automatically seven days after articles are published.

You are commenting as .

More from Foreign Policy

Putin and Guterres sit facing each other across an exceptionally long table.
Putin and Guterres sit facing each other across an exceptionally long table.

The West vs. the Rest

Welcome to the 21st-century Cold War.

A column of Russia's Topol intercontinental ballistic missile launchers at Red Square in Moscow, on May 9, 2012, during a Victory Day parade.
A column of Russia's Topol intercontinental ballistic missile launchers at Red Square in Moscow, on May 9, 2012, during a Victory Day parade.

Why Washington Should Take Russian Nuclear Threats Seriously

Historically, states have escalated when facing the prospect of imminent defeat—and Putin has a track record of following through on his threats.

Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, listens during the daily coronavirus briefing at the White House in Washington on April 9, 2020.
Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, listens during the daily coronavirus briefing at the White House in Washington on April 9, 2020.

Fauci: China’s COVID-19 Situation a ‘Disaster’

The White House’s chief medical advisor assesses the world’s response to the pandemic.

Chinese President Xi Jinping takes his tea cup during the closing session of the National People's Congress at the Great Hall of the People on March 11, in Beijing, China.
Chinese President Xi Jinping takes his tea cup during the closing session of the National People's Congress at the Great Hall of the People on March 11, in Beijing, China.

Xi Jinping Is Fighting a War for China’s History

Fear of “historical nihilism” has haunted China’s leadership for years.