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Swedish Defense Minister: ‘In Our Part of Europe, NATO Will Be Much Stronger’

Peter Hultqvist talks about Sweden’s bid for NATO, the Turkish roadblock, and what to do in the meantime.

By , a national security and intelligence reporter at Foreign Policy.
U.S. Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin stands with Swedish Defense Minister Peter Hultqvist.
U.S. Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin stands with Swedish Defense Minister Peter Hultqvist.
U.S. Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin (right) stands with Swedish Defense Minister Peter Hultqvist during an honor cordon at the Pentagon in Arlington, Virginia, on May 18. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

Russia’s War in Ukraine

On Wednesday, Sweden and Finland formally submitted their applications to join NATO at the alliance’s headquarters in Brussels, ending their long-standing policies of military nonalignment as Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has prompted a cascade of strategic shifts across Europe. 

Amy Mackinnon is a national security and intelligence reporter at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @ak_mack

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