What in the World?

This week in FP’s international news quiz: Russia makes gains in Ukraine, Biden visits Asia, and Yemeni flights take off.

By , a deputy copy editor at Foreign Policy.
A firetruck shoots a water jet to celebrate the Yemen Airways flight
A firetruck shoots a water jet to celebrate the Yemen Airways flight
A firetruck shoots a water jet to celebrate the Yemen Airways flight on the tarmac of Sanaa airport in the Yemeni capital on May 16. MOHAMMED HUWAIS/AFP via Getty Images

What in the world has gone on this week? See what you can remember with our international news quiz.

Have feedback? Email whatintheworld@foreignpolicy.com to let me know your thoughts.

What in the world has gone on this week? See what you can remember with our international news quiz.


1. Which Ukrainian city fell to Russian forces on Tuesday after they assumed full control of the besieged Azovstal steel plant?


2. Sweden and Finland officially applied for NATO membership this week. That leaves just four European Union countries that are formally neutral. Which of the following is not among them?

Malta, Ireland, Austria, and Cyprus are the four remaining formally nonaligned EU nations. Read FP’s Stephen M. Walt on why Sweden and Finland are dropping their neutral status.


3. Turkey’s president has indicated he may stand in the way of Sweden’s and Finland’s accession to NATO. What is his name?


4. U.S. President Joe Biden left Washington on Thursday to visit which two Asian nations?


5. In Australia’s election this weekend, the opposition is seeking to unseat the country’s ruling coalition, led by a center-right party. What is the party called?

Ahead of the vote, Maddison Connaughton examined the two billionaires hoping to shape the election.


6. On Monday, a commercial flight from Yemen’s capital, Sanaa, became the first to take off from the city since what year?

The flight to Amman, Jordan, came as part of a 60-day cease-fire in Yemen’s protracted war.


7. This week, the Biden administration approved a plan to return a small number of U.S. troops to which African country?

The United States is sending fewer than 500 troops to assist with counterterrorism efforts, FP’s Robbie Gramer and Jack Detsch report. The move comes on the heels of Somalia’s presidential election last Sunday, which saw a former leader retake power, FP’s Nosmot Gbadamosi writes in this week’s Africa Brief.


8. The U.S. State Department announced this week that it would be lifting several Trump administration restrictions on the United States’ engagement with Cuba. Which of the following measures was not reversed?

Biden has failed to live up to his campaign promise of eliminating all of his predecessor’s sanctions on Cuba, FP’s Catherine Osborn writes in this week’s Latin America Brief.


9. Next week, the World Economic Forum will hold its annual meetings in which Swiss city?


10. The publisher Condé Nast recently threatened legal action against an English pub with a similar name to which of its magazines?

The owner of the Star Inn at Vogue, named for the small town where it is located, responded: “You have only been in existence since 1916 and I presume that at the time when you chose the name Vogue … you didn’t seek permission from the villagers of the real Vogue.”

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Have feedback? Email whatintheworld@foreignpolicy.com to let me know your thoughts.

Nina Goldman is a deputy copy editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @goldmannk

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