What in the World?

This week in FP’s international news quiz: weapons tests, union strikes, and a new virus spreading around the world.

By , a deputy copy editor at Foreign Policy.
Supporters of the Tunisian General Labor Union gather with national flags.
Supporters of the Tunisian General Labor Union gather with national flags.
Supporters of the Tunisian General Labor Union (UGTT) gather with national flags during a rally outside its headquarters in the capital, Tunis, on June 16 amid a general strike announced by the UGTT. FETHI BELAID/AFP via Getty Images

What in the world has gone on this week? See what you can remember with our weekly international news quiz!

Have feedback? Email whatintheworld@foreignpolicy.com to let me know your thoughts.

What in the world has gone on this week? See what you can remember with our weekly international news quiz!


1. On Monday, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson introduced legislation that could nix a central component of the Brexit deal. What does Johnson’s bill target?

The Northern Ireland Protocol ensures there are no new checks on goods traded between Northern Ireland, which is part of the U.K., and Ireland.


2. South Korea’s government has found evidence that its northern neighbor may have “completed preparations” for a new nuclear weapons test. If it goes through, how many nuclear weapons tests will North Korea have conducted in its history?

FP’s Howard French argues that ending North Korea’s economic and political isolation is the only way to cool U.S.-North Korean nuclear hostilities.


3. U.S. President Joe Biden is expected to visit Saudi Arabia in mid-July to discuss rising oil prices. Which is not a reason activists are condemning the trip?

Before a recently enacted truce in Yemen’s civil war, Washington struggled to maintain a fine line between helping Saudi Arabia defend itself against Houthi-backed rebels in Yemen and halting arms deals to the kingdom, Katherine Zimmerman explains.


4. The World Health Organization is convening an emergency committee to decide whether to declare the spread of which disease an international health emergency?


5. On Wednesday, the U.K. announced it would continue to prepare to deport asylum-seekers to a different country—even after the European Court of Human Rights stopped the program’s first flight on Tuesday night.

Which country is the United Kingdom seeking to redirect asylum-seekers to?


6. British bureaucrats are protesting the U.K.’s planned deportation of asylum-seekers by doing what?


7. The Tunisian General Labor Union’s 1 million members held a nationwide strike on Wednesday to protest the current Tunisian president’s rule. Who is the Tunisian president?

As national unrest grows, the union is the only body with enough power to “derail Saied’s plans to overhaul the constitution,” Simon Speakman Cordall reports from Tunis.


8. This Sunday, Colombians will vote in the runoff of their country’s presidential election. Which two final candidates are neck and neck in the polls?


9. U.S. senators requested an increase to the United States’ defense budget—already the world’s largest—to combat inflation, support Ukraine’s war effort, and increase the U.S. weapons stockpile. What is their total defense budget request?


10. One of the following companies—which all left Russia after its invasion of Ukraine—has returned to the country under Russian ownership and is now called Vkusno i tochka. Which is it?

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Have feedback? Email whatintheworld@foreignpolicy.com to let me know your thoughts.

Alexandra Sharp is a deputy copy editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @AlexandraSSharp

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