Adam Tooze Is Answering Your Questions

FP’s economics columnist discusses how to manage record inflation.

By , the executive producer of FP Live at Foreign Policy.
070822-Tooze-fplive-1500x1000-landing
070822-Tooze-fplive-1500x1000-landing

Energy prices are surging. Food supplies are depleted. Stocks have entered bear market territory. And inflation is running at historic highs.

The underlying factors for the world’s current economic troubles include Russia’s invasion of Ukraine and a hangover from pandemic-related shutdowns, but they also trace their roots further back into monetary policy since the 2008 financial crisis.

The question is how to manage an overheated economy: Are there lessons from 1970s-era inflation? Or is today’s situation unprecedented? How can economists prevent a tough recession?

Energy prices are surging. Food supplies are depleted. Stocks have entered bear market territory. And inflation is running at historic highs.

The underlying factors for the world’s current economic troubles include Russia’s invasion of Ukraine and a hangover from pandemic-related shutdowns, but they also trace their roots further back into monetary policy since the 2008 financial crisis.

The question is how to manage an overheated economy: Are there lessons from 1970s-era inflation? Or is today’s situation unprecedented? How can economists prevent a tough recession?

Join FP editor in chief Ravi Agrawal for an in-depth interview with FP columnist and Columbia University professor Adam Tooze, whose latest book is Crashed: How a Decade of Financial Crises Changed the World.

Tooze is a contributor to FP’s summer 2022 print issue “Back to the Future.” This interview will be available for subscribers on demand on July 8 at noon EDT.

Leave your questions in the comment section below, and we may include it in the interview.

Tal Alroy is the executive producer of FP Live at Foreign Policy.

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