What in the World?

This week in FP’s international news quiz: NATO summitry, protests in Ecuador, and Independence Day around the world.

By , a deputy copy editor at Foreign Policy.
World leaders pose for a group photo during the NATO summit
World leaders pose for a group photo during the NATO summit
World leaders pose for a group photo during the NATO summit in Madrid on June 29. Stefan Rousseau - WPA Pool/Getty Images

What in the world has gone on this week? Test your knowledge with our weekly international news quiz.

Have feedback? Email whatintheworld@foreignpolicy.com to let me know your thoughts.

What in the world has gone on this week? Test your knowledge with our weekly international news quiz.


1. NATO leaders gathered for a key summit in Madrid this week. Who is the alliance’s secretary-general?

FP’s Keith Johnson and Clara Gutman spoke with U.S. Sen. Chris Coons after the summit to discuss Russia’s war in Ukraine, NATO’s turn to Asia, and more.


2. Several countries from the Indo-Pacific region joined the summit for the first time. Which of the following was not among them?

Their participation is an indicator of NATO’s increasingly global purview, FP’s Michael Hirsh writes.


3. Canada, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States agreed last weekend to ban the import of which Russian product, if it is newly mined or refined?


4. The United Nations hosted a convention on what subject in Lisbon this week?

Want to dive deeper? FP’s new podcast The Catch, produced in partnership with the Walton Family Foundation, examines the state of global fishing by following squid from the ocean to your plate.


5. Ecuador’s government reached an agreement with Indigenous protesters on Thursday after weeks of unrest shook the country. What is not included in the deal?

Last December, FP’s Catherine Osborn profiled three Indigenous leaders shaping the future of Ecuadorian politics.


6. Which Southeast Asian leader visited Russian President Vladimir Putin on Thursday?


7. Leaders from the Economic Community of West African States will meet this weekend in which African capital?

Mali, Guinea, and Burkina Faso are all at risk of further sanctions from the bloc over their military leadership.


8. Which American basketball player—who the U.S. State Department says is being “wrongfully detained”—went on trial in Russia this week?

Russian authorities are trying Griner on drug smuggling charges.


9. The United States celebrates Independence Day this coming Monday. In 1946, which other country also gained independence—from the United States—on July 4?

From the FP archives: In 2016, Benjamin Soloway marked 70 years of Philippine independence from the United States with a look back at the U.S. colonial role on the archipelago.


10. Dutch media reported this week that a historic Rotterdam bridge would remain intact for the moment, after a plan to dismantle parts of it prompted outcry.

The proposed removal of sections of the bridge had been intended to accommodate a yacht owned by which billionaire?

Thousands of opponents had said they would throw eggs at the $500 million yacht if it were to sail through the area.

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Have feedback? Email whatintheworld@foreignpolicy.com to let me know your thoughts.

Nina Goldman is a deputy copy editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @goldmannk

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