What in the World?

This week in FP’s international news quiz: Boris Johnson is out, G-20 ministers gather, and India faces a tech lawsuit.

By , a deputy copy editor at Foreign Policy.
British Prime Minister Boris Johnson
British Prime Minister Boris Johnson
British Prime Minister Boris Johnson prepares to address the nation as he announces his resignation outside No. 10 Downing St. in London on July 7. Carl Court/Getty Images

Do you have a nose for news? Test yourself with our weekly quiz!

Have feedback? Email whatintheworld@foreignpolicy.com to let me know your thoughts.

Do you have a nose for news? Test yourself with our weekly quiz!


1. British Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced his resignation from the leadership of the Conservative Party on Thursday. After a scandal-plagued premiership, what was the controversy that finally forced him to step back?

A combination of all these scandals—and more—ultimately brought the prime minister down, but the wave of resignations over his handling of the sexual misconduct allegations was the nail in the coffin.


2. The fatal shooting of former Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on Friday sent shock waves through what is one of the world’s safest countries.

In 2021, how many recorded gun deaths were there in Japan?

William Sposato examines the impact of Abe’s assassination on Japanese society.


3. Which country hosted a meeting of G-20 foreign ministers this week?


4. Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi met with his U.S. counterpart on the sidelines of the summit. Who is the U.S. secretary of state?


5. Russia’s war in Ukraine continues, primarily in the country’s east. Russia declared victory this week in the province of Luhansk and is now expected to target the other part of the Donbas region, known as what?

Three days before its invasion of Ukraine, Russia recognized parts of Donetsk and Luhansk as independent “people’s republics.”


6. The final draft of Chile’s proposed new constitution was presented to President Gabriel Boric on Monday. The document would redefine the nation as a “plurinational” state, in recognition of its significant Indigenous population.

What is Chile’s largest Indigenous group, with more than 1 million members?

FP’s Catherine Osborn breaks down Chile’s constitutional rewrite in this week’s Latin America Brief.


7. The United States’ domestic intelligence agency, the FBI, collaborated with its British counterpart this week to warn of mass Chinese espionage worldwide. What is the British agency known as?


8. The president of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Felix Tshisekedi, met on Wednesday with Rwanda’s president amid tensions over the growth of a Congolese rebel group in the two countries’ border region. What is the Rwandan leader’s name?

For more on the controversial rebel group, known as M23, read Mélanie Gouby’s dispatch from the Congo-Rwanda border region.


9. Which major tech platform took the Indian government to court this week after it was forced to remove content New Delhi disapproved of?

FP’s Michael Kugelman covers the court battle in this week’s South Asia Brief.


10. Amid rising inflation, penguins at a Japanese zoo made headlines this week for their apparent outrage at what cost-cutting measure?

“Some of the animals refuse to eat the cheaper food. While some peck at it gingerly, others flat out turn their beaks up at it,” Vice World News reported.

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Nina Goldman is a deputy copy editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @goldmannk

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