What in the World?

This week in FP’s international news quiz: potential prime ministers, skyrocketing inflation, and a new deal in the Black Sea.

By , a deputy copy editor at Foreign Policy.
Protests over inflation in Ghana
Protests over inflation in Ghana
A protester holds a placard at a demonstration over soaring living costs in Accra, Ghana, on June 29. NIPAH DENNIS/AFP via Getty Images

Are you a global news nerd? Test your knowledge with our weekly quiz!

Have feedback? Email whatintheworld@foreignpolicy.com to let me know your thoughts.

Are you a global news nerd? Test your knowledge with our weekly quiz!


1. Which Italian politician—the head of the far-right Brothers of Italy party—is viewed as a top contender to replace Prime Minister Mario Draghi, who announced his resignation on Thursday?

Last year, Mattia Ferraresi profiled Meloni, writing that she was “poised to become the standard-bearer of the Italian right, despite her party’s historical roots in postwar neofascism.”


2. Meanwhile, who are the final two candidates in the race to replace outgoing British Prime Minister Boris Johnson?

FP’s Amy Mackinnon profiled Truss last year, shortly after she was named foreign secretary. Time will tell whether being profiled in Foreign Policy has become a harbinger of future premiership in both Britain and Italy.


3. Iranian President Ebrahim Raisi, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, and Russian President Vladimir Putin met in Tehran on Tuesday to discuss what issue?


4. Ghana recorded skyrocketing inflation last month and is now weighing a request for help from the International Monetary Fund. What is the country’s currency, which has lost about a quarter of its value against the U.S. dollar in 2022 so far?

After a recent visit to Ghana, FP’s Howard W. French reflects on how the West’s view of development success can produce toxic results for locals.


5. Which country did European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen visit this week on a mission to ease the continent’s reliance on Russian gas?

After von der Leyen’s visit, Azerbaijani leaders agreed to double their exports of gas to the European Union by 2027. FP’s Christina Lu interviewed the International Energy Agency’s Fatih Birol about the energy crisis in Europe and beyond.


6. On Friday, Ukraine and Russia reached a deal that will make it easier for what product to be exported through the Black Sea?


7. What is the popular nickname of former Brazilian President Luiz Inácio da Silva, who was formally nominated by his party for the presidency again on Thursday?

Lula legally adopted the nickname in 1982, becoming Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva.


8. Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov heads off on a four-nation tour of Africa this weekend. Between 2017 and 2021, what percentage of major arms imports to Africa came from Russia?

This year, Russia’s arms business in Africa is likely suffering as its equipment gets ground down in Ukraine, FP’s Jack Detsch reports.


9. China is pushing United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Bachelet not to release the results of her recent visit to which Chinese region?

Critics including Benedict Rogers condemned Bachelet’s apparently soft tone during her visit to Xinjiang, where millions of Uyghurs have faced a draconian government crackdown. But China’s reaction indicates the final report could be harsher than expected.


10. According to the latest Henley Passport Index, passport-holders from which country have the greatest flexibility to travel?

Japanese passport-holders can visit 193 destinations without an advance visa, Henley reported.

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Nina Goldman is a deputy copy editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @goldmannk

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