What in the World?

This week in FP’s international news quiz: a journey through the Foreign Policy archives.

By , a deputy copy editor at Foreign Policy.
An official searches the court archive at Albania's Supreme Court
An official searches the court archive at Albania's Supreme Court
An official searches the court archive at Albania's Supreme Court on June 28, 2019. GENT SHKULLAKU/AFP via Getty Images

This week in our quiz, we’re skipping the latest headlines and heading back into the FP archives for a look at some of our staff and contributors’ top coverage from the past five years.

Have feedback? Email whatintheworld@foreignpolicy.com to let me know your thoughts.

 

This week in our quiz, we’re skipping the latest headlines and heading back into the FP archives for a look at some of our staff and contributors’ top coverage from the past five years.


1. How much did the U.S. Navy spend to create Project Azriel, a zombie-themed video game, in 2017?

The game was marketed as “cognitive training,” but it isn’t much fun—and the Navy’s research around its creation is opaque, Benjamin Soloway wrote on its release.


2. Where did former CIA officer Larry Sanchez—known for his controversial work helping police surveil Muslims in New York after 9/11—set up a lucrative security training program in the 2010s?

In 2017, Jenna McLaughlin detailed how the UAE is using ex-CIA officers to build a spy empire.


3. Donald Trump nominated 119 ambassadors during his first 20 months as U.S. president. What percentage were white, and what percentage were male, respectively?

For more on the U.S. State Department’s diversity problem—in the former Trump administration and beyond—read this 2018 report by Robbie Gramer and Jefcoate O’Donnell.


4. Which former U.S. president served Fritos to both former Dutch Prime Minister Willem Drees and former British Prime Minister Winston Churchill at official luncheons?

For more mouth-watering and stomach-churning details on nearly nine decades of White House state dinners, check out this 2019 long read from C.K. Hickey.


5. Which animal was named to Foreign Policy’s 2019 Global Thinkers list?

Koko, who died in 2018, “became a symbol of interspecies communication” through “her ability to communicate using sign language,” her entry reads. Take a look back at all the members of FP’s 2019 Global Thinkers list.


6. Which United Nations project drew scrutiny in 2019 over its misappropriation of funds?

Read FP’s impactful investigation of the project by Colum Lynch and Amy Mackinnon.


7. In 1979, a double flash of light was detected in the Indian Ocean. What do most experts think caused the mysterious event, known as the Vela incident?

On the 40th anniversary of the Vela incident, Sasha Polakow-Suransky assembled a team of experts to analyze the event and consider its place in history.


8. How many Black curators did the British Museum, home to thousands of looted artifacts from Africa, have as of July 2020?

Museums and activists in Africa have called for the artifacts’ return, Nosmot Gbadamosi wrote.


9. What is the name of U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken’s band, in which he plays the electric guitar?

In 2020, ahead of Blinken’s appointment, Lauren Teixeira sought to discern the future secretary’s foreign-policy agenda with a deep analysis of Ablinken’s lyrics.


10. Social media has allowed athletes to become activists on the global stage—and collaborate across borders—like never before.

How many more Twitter followers does U.S. gymnastics star Simone Biles have than the official USA Gymnastics account?

Ahead of the Tokyo Olympics in 2021, Allison Meakem examined the growing gap between athletes and the countries they represent.

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Have feedback? Email whatintheworld@foreignpolicy.com to let me know your thoughts.

 

Nina Goldman is a deputy copy editor at Foreign Policy.

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