What in the World?

This week in FP’s international news quiz: Russian battlefield losses, North Korean missile tests, and an annual Spanish tradition.

By , a deputy copy editor at Foreign Policy.
Voters wait in lines to cast their ballot in Brazil’s general elections in Rocinha in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on Oct. 2.
Voters wait in lines to cast their ballot in Brazil’s general elections in Rocinha in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on Oct. 2.
Voters wait in lines to cast their ballot in Brazil’s general elections in Rocinha in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on Oct. 2. Wagner Meier/Getty Images

New author, same game! How well can you remember what happened this week with our international news quiz?

Have feedback? Email whatintheworld@foreignpolicy.com to let me know your thoughts.

New author, same game! How well can you remember what happened this week with our international news quiz?


1. On Sunday, Brazil held the first round of its presidential election. Who is the country’s incumbent president, who is seeking a second term?

Bolsonaro faces a stiff challenge from Lula but performed far better than expected in the Oct. 2 vote, FP’s Catherine Osborn writes in this week’s Latin America Brief.


2. Last Friday, a military coup in Burkina Faso ousted Lt. Col. Paul-Henri Sandaogo Damiba as the ruling junta’s leader. How long had Damiba been in power?

Damiba also took control in a coup—making his ouster Burkina Faso’s second such takeover this year, FP’s Nosmot Gbadamosi writes in this week’s Africa Brief.


3. On Monday, British Prime Minister Liz Truss reversed a controversial economic policy that had caused the pound’s value to fall and forced the Bank of England to buy up bonds. What was the policy?

The pound’s historic plunge could create a political crisis in Britain, FP’s Amy Mackinnon and Anusha Rathi explain.


4. The European Union and the United States are considering imposing new sanctions on which country after a new wave of protests there was met with violent crackdowns?

Although Iran has experienced protest movements before, this iteration is likely to leave the country permanently changed, Sajjad Safaei writes.


5. Russia has faced repeated military setbacks after illegally annexing four Ukrainian territories. Which is not one of the territories Russia has claimed as its own?

Russia’s preparation for a short—rather than long—war and Ukraine’s superior recruitment have caused irreparable Russian battlefield losses, FP’s Jack Detsch reports.


6. This week, North Korea worried international adversaries by launching ballistic missiles near Japanese and South Korean territory. How many missiles did North Korea launch?

Pyongyang’s tests come after a significant update to its nuclear weapons laws last month. The new rules offer insight into how North Korea views deterrence, FP’s Megan DuBois writes.


7. Which international body on Thursday rejected a proposal to debate alleged atrocities in China’s Xinjiang region?

The move came despite a recent U.N. report that found Chinese authorities had perpetrated crimes against humanity in Xinjiang. Last month, FP’s Azeem Ibrahim argued that these allegations don’t go far enough.


8. Pakistan has suffered grave flooding this year after a detrimental monsoon season. Which country also faced extreme flooding this week?


9. Forget the Running of the Bulls. In Spain’s Catalonia region, 41 teams competed this week in which annual contest?


10. Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni was forced to issue an apology for a series of odd tweets posted by his son. Which is not something his son wrote on Twitter?

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Alexandra Sharp is a deputy copy editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @AlexandraSSharp

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