Latin America Brief Chat: Brazil Decides

A space for subscribers to submit questions to FP’s Catherine Osborn on the Brazilian elections.

Latin-America-Brief-Chat-Catherine-Osborn-3-2
Latin-America-Brief-Chat-Catherine-Osborn-3-2
Oriana Fenwick illustration for Foreign Policy

Few national elections have drawn as much global attention this year as the contest between incumbent Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro, a far-right Christian nationalist, and former leftist Brazilian President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva. The two candidates have dueled on the campaign trail for months and offer starkly different visions for Brazil. This Sunday, their electoral fates will be decided in a runoff. But that might not be the end of Brazil’s political drama: Bolsonaro and his supporters have suggested that they may not accept the results of the election if he loses.

Whatever happens, join Rio de Janeiro-based journalist and author of FP’s Latin America Brief Catherine Osborn for a special live chat on Monday, Oct. 31, from 1 to 2 p.m. EDT to get your questions answered about the Oct. 30 presidential runoff results, and what’s next for Brazil. FP subscribers can submit their questions ahead of time in the comments section below, and Catherine will respond live during next week’s Q&A.

Commenting is an exclusive benefit of an FP subscription. Subscribe today to join the conversation.

Few national elections have drawn as much global attention this year as the contest between incumbent Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro, a far-right Christian nationalist, and former leftist Brazilian President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva. The two candidates have dueled on the campaign trail for months and offer starkly different visions for Brazil. This Sunday, their electoral fates will be decided in a runoff. But that might not be the end of Brazil’s political drama: Bolsonaro and his supporters have suggested that they may not accept the results of the election if he loses.

Whatever happens, join Rio de Janeiro-based journalist and author of FP’s Latin America Brief Catherine Osborn for a special live chat on Monday, Oct. 31, from 1 to 2 p.m. EDT to get your questions answered about the Oct. 30 presidential runoff results, and what’s next for Brazil. FP subscribers can submit their questions ahead of time in the comments section below, and Catherine will respond live during next week’s Q&A.

Commenting is an exclusive benefit of an FP subscription. Subscribe today to join the conversation.

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