Flash Points

Themed journeys through our archive.

5 Pieces of Art That Reflect on Foreign Policy

Artists interpret global affairs and sociopolitical trends in our archive.

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Winnie Davies

In the mid-2010s, Foreign Policy published a number of “Visual Statements”—pieces of art by painters, illustrators, and digital artists reflecting on world politics and sociopolitical trends.

Below you’ll find five of our favorites, from a painting depicting Hong Kong’s relationship with Beijing to an illustration of the disguises worn by far-right politicians to a modernized version of a classic Norman Rockwell painting reimagined with characters from Greek society.—Chloe Hadavas

Real Suffrage

A painting by Winnie Davies reflects on Hong Kong’s relationship with mainland China—and how Hong Kongers’ demands never seem to reach Beijing.

In the mid-2010s, Foreign Policy published a number of “Visual Statements”—pieces of art by painters, illustrators, and digital artists reflecting on world politics and sociopolitical trends.

Below you’ll find five of our favorites, from a painting depicting Hong Kong’s relationship with Beijing to an illustration of the disguises worn by far-right politicians to a modernized version of a classic Norman Rockwell painting reimagined with characters from Greek society.—Chloe Hadavas


Real Suffrage

A painting by Winnie Davies reflects on Hong Kong’s relationship with mainland China—and how Hong Kongers’ demands never seem to reach Beijing.


Birds of a Feather

Pep Montserrat’s illustration explores how far-right politicians camouflage themselves and climb to power using the trappings and tools of democracy.


A Shot Across the Bow

Mary Iverson depicts the consequences of the amazing growth of the global shipping industry.


The Grossips

Stefanos Andreadis attempts to modernize Norman Rockwell’s famous painting The Gossips by applying his characters to Greek society.


The Choking Point

Barry Rosenthal uses items washed up on the world’s shores to signify the looming ecological threat.

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