Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny and his wife, Yulia

Dissidents Aren’t Saints

The organized campaign against Alexei Navalny was damaging and misplaced.

Israeli lawmaker and leader of centrist Yesh Atid party, Yair Lapid, speaks at a press conference in Tel Aviv, Israel, on March 2, 2015.

How a Journalist-Turned-Politician Became the Best Hope for Israel’s Anyone-but-Bibi Camp

Centrist Yair Lapid refused to join Netanyahu’s coalition last year. Now the decision is paying off.

A fisherman holds a batch of tuna on Sept. 25, 2015, in Kiribati, where fishing is one of the most common occupations.

How Eight Pacific Island States Are Saving the World’s Tuna

They have created a strikingly successful scheme that prevents overfishing and raises local incomes at once.

Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif (L) meets with the director-general of the International Atomic Energy Agency, Rafael Grossi (R), in Tehran, on Feb. 21.

Who’s to Blame for Stalling U.S.-Iran Negotiations?

Biden was expected to revive the nuclear deal quickly—but as pro-Iran militias attack U.S. forces in Iraq and Washington strikes back in Syria, direct talks aren’t on the horizon.

Saudi Foreign Minister Saud al-Faisal welcomes U.S. Vice President Joe Biden at Riyadh Air Base on Oct. 27, 2011.

Can Biden Really Shrug Off the Saudis?

David Rundell, a seasoned Saudi hand, talks to Foreign Policy about what’s really at stake with the Biden administration’s reassessment of a decades-old relationship.

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge join Prime Minister Boris Johnson and various heads of state and dignitaries at the U.K.-Africa Investment Summit at London’s Buckingham Palace on Jan. 20, 2020.

Britain Shouldn’t Put Its Money on a Post-Brexit Rapprochement With Africa

Boris Johnson is looking to old U.K. colonies for trade deals, but his government can’t compete with China and won’t get far until it abandons its neocolonial attitudes.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan

Biden Gives Turkey the Silent Treatment

If U.S.-Turkey relations were already strained under Trump, Biden’s pressure on Ankara raises questions about the relationship with a longtime NATO ally.

Eliot Higgins, the founder and executive director of Bellingcat, speaks during the world’s biggest tech festival, Campus Party, in Utrecht, the Netherlands, on May 27, 2016.

The Mice Who Caught the Cat—and Rattled the Kremlin

“We Are Bellingcat” charts the rise of the digital sleuths who have used open-source investigations to foil Russia’s intelligence agencies.

Eritrean soldiers wait in line to cross the border to attend a reopening ceremony with Ethiopia in Serha, Eritrea, on Sept. 11, 2018.

From Pariah to Kingmaker

Eritrea’s Isaias Afwerki is fueling bloodshed in Tigray—and offering other regional leaders lessons in authoritarianism.

Joe Biden holds up a copy of his daily schedule, which includes statistics about how many U.S. troops have died while serving in Afghanistan and Iraq and updates about the coronavirus caseload in the U.S., while speaking before a roundtable event with military veterans at Hillsborough Community College on Sept. 15, 2020 in Tampa, Florida.

Biden Has a Plan to Not Break Afghanistan

New details are trickling out about how the United States is preparing to withdraw its troops without leaving chaos behind.

George Kennan's "Long Telegram"

Oh God, Not Another Long Telegram About China

U.S. strategists love grand proclamations—but ignore domestic political realities.

In the Magazine

In the Magazine

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America and the World: How to Build Back Better

Looking back on 50 years of U.S. foreign policy and the lessons they hold for Washington today.

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A New Pivot to Asia

The fuzzy goodwill between Biden and America’s Asian allies will soon be tested by China’s growing power.

Foreign Policy Begins at Home

The best way for Biden to build better partnerships abroad is to get America’s own house in order—that starts with human rights.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan (C), Russian President Vladimir Putin (L) and Iranian President Hassan Rouhani (R) attend a joint press conference in Ankara on Sept. 16, 2019.

The Middle East’s Next Conflicts Won’t Be Between Arab States and Iran

The Arab moment has passed. Competition between non-Arab powers—Turkey, Iran, and Israel—will shape the region’s future.

A man walks past a billboard for the construction of an oil refinery and storage facility in the port city of Hambantota, Sri Lanka, on March 24, 2019.

Chinese Belt and Road Investment Isn’t All Bad—or Good

As Sri Lanka shows, when it comes to Chinese debt, small states have agency and great powers have responsibilities.

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson during a televised press conference at 10 Downing Street on Feb. 22 in London.

British Prime Minister Is a Broken Job

Why Boris Johnson’s failures in the pandemic are partly the product of the office he holds.

U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken delivers remarks about priorities for the Biden administration at the State Department in Washington on March 3.

Confidence, Humility, and the United States’ New Direction in the World

A transcript of Antony Blinken’s remarks on U.S. foreign policy.

Policemen inspect the facilities at a coal mine in Changji in northwest China's Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region on Feb. 21.

Meet Today’s Masters of the Universe

“The World for Sale” peels back the cover on the secretive—and sometimes shady—people who make the modern world go around.

Indian soldiers patrol along a barbed-wire fence near Baras Post on the Line of Control on Dec. 4, 2003.

War Is Over Between India and Pakistan—for Now

A new cease-fire at the Line of Control must avoid problems that have derailed past attempts at peace.

Workers pack syringes at the Hindustan Syringes and Medical Devices factory in Faridabad, India, on Sept. 2, 2020.

To Democratize Vaccine Access, Democratize Production

U.S. and European COVID-19 shots aren’t enough. It is time to tap into Africa, Asia, and Latin America’s enormous production capacity.

Voices

A Chinese People’s Armed Police Force member conducts tactical training in Guiyang, China, on July 28, 2020.

China Is Losing Influence—and That Makes It Dangerous

The best thing Biden can do is lighten up on China and let gravity take its toll.

A temporary fence surrounds the U.S. Capitol

America’s Forever Wars Have Come Back Home

It’s no coincidence that, after years of fighting abroad, the United States is beset with paranoia, loss of trust, and increasingly bitter divisions.

U.S. President Joe Biden steps off Air Force One upon arrival at Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland on March 1.

Can Biden Finally Put the Middle East in Check and Pivot Already?

The new administration, like previous ones, has a Middle East quagmire. But it’s trying some nuanced moves to break free.

U.S. President-elect Joe Biden

Biden’s Plan to Lead From Alongside

The new U.S. president believes in the legitimacy of American power. Does the rest of the world?

A FOCUS ON RACE AND FOREIGN POLICY

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Why Is Mainstream International Relations Blind to Racism?

Ignoring the central role of race and colonialism in world affairs precludes an accurate understanding of the modern state system.

Black Lives Matter Protest London

When Did Racism Become Solely a Domestic Issue?

International relations theorists once explored racism. What has the field lost by giving that up?

Nelson Mandela visits Hlengiwe School in Johannesburg on May 1, 1993.

Put Racial Justice at Center of the Biden-Harris Transition Plan

The new administration can learn from South Africa’s experience with transitional justice.

Economic Freedom Fighters supporters gather in front of the U.S. Embassy in Pretoria, on June 8 in solidarity with the global Black Lives Matter movement.

The Legacy of American Racism

Domestic racism has long impacted U.S. foreign policy. It’s time to open up about it.

Special insights on the post-pandemic world

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The World After the Coronavirus

Twelve leading thinkers on geopolitics after the pandemic.

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The Future of Travel

Seven predictions for how tourism will change.

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Will Schools and Universities Ever Return to Normal?

Nine experts on the future of education after the pandemic.

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The Future of the State

Ten leading global thinkers on government after the pandemic.

visual stories

A pro-democracy protester is detained by riot police officers during a rally against the military coup in Yangon, Myanmar, on Feb. 27. Stringer/REUTERS

The Month in World Photos

February brought unrest in Myanmar after a military coup—plus a spectacular volcanic show in Italy, a reopened border for asylum seekers in the United States, and a celebrated landing on Mars.

A protester embraces a member of the Belarusian Interior Ministry troops who was standing guard during a demonstration against police violence and rejecting the presidential election results in Minsk, Belarus, on Aug. 14. Vasily Fedosenko/REUTERS

Rising Up in Protest: A Year in Photos

Fists raised and voices lifted, people around the world took to the streets in 2020—to stand up against police brutality, demand democracy, and confront other injustices. A look at some of the photos that captured the year’s most defining movements.