Boys in their senior year at the Protection of Civilians Camp 3 study after class in Juba, South Sudan, on March 23. (Alex Potter for Foreign Policy)

For South Sudan, It’s Not So Easy to Declare Independence From Arabic

When the world’s newest country broke away from Khartoum, it discarded Sudan’s main official language, too. But casting aside the oppressor’s tongue did not heal the country’s divisions.

Then-U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor Tom Malinowski speaks at the State Department in Washington on April 13, 2016. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

A Human Rights Champion Comes to the House

Congressman-elect Tom Malinowski says he hopes his diplomatic credentials can help Democrats push back on Trump.

U.S. President Donald Trump takes part in a ceremony commemorating the 100th anniversary of the armistice ending World War I at the Suresnes American Cemetery outside Paris on Nov. 11. (Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump’s Problem in Europe Isn’t Optics

The president’s latest trip was a disaster—but not because he acted like a boorish bully.

Swedish Speaker of Parliament Andreas Norlen (L) meets with Moderate party leader Ulf Kristersson (R) at the Parliament in Stockholm on September 27, 2018.

Swedish Leaders Will Try Anything to Shut Out the Far-Right

No one wants to enter a coalition with the Sweden Democrats, so the country is resorting to desperate and untested measures to form a new government.

Afghanistan National Army  soldiers are reflected in the water as they stand near a dam during a ceremony on March 25, 2012.

Afghanistan’s Rivers Could Be India’s Next Weapon Against Pakistan

New Delhi is funding an ambitious dam near Kabul that could reduce water flow to its rival downstream. The project might spark the world’s next conflict.

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un inspects the successful test-fire of the intercontinental ballistic missile Hwasong-14 at an undisclosed location on July 4, 2017. (STR/AFP/Getty Images)

‘Camouflage, Concealment, and Deception’

What satellite imagery tells us about North Korea’s ballistic missile program.

(Illustration by Penguin Lab for Foreign Policy)

China’s Pop Idols Are Too Soft for the Party

Stars like Kris Wu are huge with fans, but sit uncomfortably with macho ambitions.

Voices

Omani Leader Sultan Qaboos bin Said addresses the annual session of the Council of Oman in Muscat on Nov. 12, 2012. (Mohammed Mahjoud/AFP/Getty Images)

Oman Just Bought Israeli Insurance

Why is Sultan Qaboos cozying up to Benjamin Netanyahu? The answer is in Washington.

Former President Barack Obama, former Vice President Al Gore, former President George W. Bush, and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton arrive at the memorial service for Sen. John McCain at the Washington National Cathedral on Sept. 1. (Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

The Foreign-Policy Establishment Reeks of Desperation

After years of failure, elites have only name-calling left.

An estimated 4,000 people gather to march for solidarity during President Donald Trump's visit to Pittsburgh in the wake of a mass shooting at a synagogue on Oct. 30. (Jeff Swensen/Getty Images)

Trump’s Divisive Speech Puts the First Amendment at Risk

Americans’ commitment to unfettered free speech is starting to fray. If Trump can’t control his words, those around him have a responsibility to keep hate speech in check.

European Council President Donald Tusk (from left), British Prime Minister Theresa May, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, and U.S. President Donald Trump prepare for a photo at the G-7 summit in La Malbaie, Canada, on June 7. (Leon Neal/Getty Images)

The Economic Crisis Is Over. Populism Is Forever.

From the United States to Germany, the West is booming—but the public hasn’t regained an appetite for liberalism.

Galleries

A voter observes election counting at the end of the first round of the presidential elections at a polling station in Antananarivo, Madagascar, on Nov. 7. (MARCO LONGARI/AFP/Getty Images)

A Week in World Photos

Election watching in Madagascar, World War I remembrance in London, and Diwali celebrations in India.

A displaced Yemeni girl walks to class in a makeshift school in the northern district of Abs in Yemen's northwestern Hajjah province on Oct. 28. ESSA AHMED/AFP/Getty Images

A Week in World Photos

Crisis in Yemen, remembrance in Russia, and snow in France.

In the Magazine

In the Magazine

A cruise ship near the harbor of Ilulissat off the west coast of Greenland, north of the Arctic Circle, in August 2012. (Education Images/UIG via Getty Images)

Stretched Thin on Thin Ice

With the Arctic melting and northern coast guards struggling to keep up, the next disaster is a matter of when, not if.

Matt Chase illustration for Foreign Policy

Food Fight

Why the next big battle may not be fought over treasure or territory—but for fish.

The Taliban’s Fight for Hearts and Minds

The militants’ new strategy is to out-govern the U.S.-backed administration in Kabul—and it’s working.

Point and Nuke

Remembering the era of portable atomic bombs.

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