A group of young intellectuals and artists protest in Cuba

Pandemic Crisis Drives Cubans to Rare, Risky Protest

Economic devastation and tightened censorship have made for a bleak 2020.

A sign in a shop in London advertises 5G mobile technology on Jan. 28.

How China Is Buying Up the West’s High-Tech Sector

Chinese acquisitions of Western firms are only part of the problem. Secret venture capital is handing power to Beijing under the radar.

President-elect Joe Biden departs after delivering a Thanksgiving address at the Queen Theatre on Nov. 25 in Wilmington, Delaware. 

Will Biden’s National Security Team Include the Democrats’ Progressive Wing?

It’s unclear whether the party’s left can make its voice heard in the new administration.

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The Biden Transition

All the new hires and plans in one place. Click to read FP’s coverage on a fraught transfer of power.

Assistants await patients at a check-in counter for vaccinations against COVID-19 at the converted Merkur-Arena in Düsseldorf, Germany on Dec. 1.

Where Do Things Stand With the COVID-19 Vaccine Rollout?

Some Britons will get shots starting next week—but in the rest of the world, it’s going to take a while.

U.S. President-elect Joe Biden

Biden Expected to Put the World’s Kleptocrats on Notice

The U.S. president-elect and his top advisors have made the fight against dirty money one of their early priorities.

Riot police in Bangkok

Thailand’s Military Is Getting Ready for Another Crackdown

The Biden administration must prepare to stand up for protesters.

A beggar who said he lost his leg from a mine injury is seen in traffic on Sept. 21, 2019 in Kabul, Afghanistan.

Afghanistan Needs Truth Before It Can Have Reconciliation

The victims of the country’s endless wars could provide the key to a lasting peace.

A protester gestures toward the media as he marches with a demonstration calling for the end of police violence in Nigeria, on Oct. 21, 2020 in London, England.

Foreign Governments Are Aiding Nigeria’s Violence Against Protesters

The suppression of protests against police brutality wouldn’t have been possible without arms and training from abroad.

People walk along a street in Planeta, in the municipality of La Lima, Honduras after the passage of Hurricane Eta on Nov. 9.

Honduras and Nicaragua Have Been Hit By Some of the Worst Natural Disasters in Decades

If Biden gets the response right, he could put the region on better footing for years to come.

Workers move iron girders from a crane at the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD), near Guba, Ethiopia, on Dec. 26, 2019.

Ethiopia Needs the United States to Act as an Honest Broker in the Nile Dam Dispute

As East Africa faces a triple crisis from COVID-19, floods, and locusts, cutting U.S. aid to Ethiopia is not the solution.

Supporters of U.S. President Donald Trump

Democracy Is Still Not Safe in the United States

Recreating democratic values means ditching the excuse of tradition.

Then U.S. Vice President Joe Biden reaches out to shake hands with then Kenyan President Mwai Kibaki after a joint media briefing at the state house in Nairobi on June 8, 2010.

It’s Time for an Africa Policy Upgrade

Washington has sidelined Africa for too long.

Supporters of then presidential candidate Jair Bolsonaro gather at Copacabana beach during a "Women for Bolsonaro" demonstration in Rio de Janeiro on Sept. 29, 2018.

The Feminine Appeal of Macho Populism

Donald Trump isn’t the only right-wing populist to govern with aggression—and do surprisingly well with women.

People in Seoul watch reporting on the U.S. presidential election

South Korea Matters More to the United States Than North Korea’s Nukes

The Biden administration should prioritize one of America’s most important allies.

In the Magazine

In the Magazine

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The Most Important Election. Ever.

Why the fate of the American republic—and the world—could depend on what happens Nov. 3.

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A Perilous Presidential Handoff

The presidential transition of power has long been a weakness of the U.S. political system. But never more so than now.

The Real Hacking Threat

It doesn’t matter if Russia actually sways the vote. What matters is whether Americans think it did.

Emerging Stronger From the Great Lockdown

The managing director and the chief economist of the International Monetary Fund lay out a strategy for sustained recovery.

U.S. President Donald Trump and then-Defense Secretary Jim Mattis

Pentagon Purges Leading Advisors From Defense Policy Board

It’s unclear why the Trump administration waited until its final months to shake up the influential group of outside experts advising top Pentagon leaders.

People walk in front of Ethiopian flags marking the new Ethiopian Millennium on Sept. 10, 2007 in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

Ethiopia’s Government and the TPLF Leadership Are Not Morally Equivalent

The leaders of the Tigray People’s Liberation Front are seeking to manipulate the international community into backing a power-sharing deal.

View of the Peace Monument outside the headquarters of Venezuelan state-owned oil company PDVSA in Caracas on April 22.

Is OPEC Over?

After 60 years, the organization is struggling to weather the pandemic and peak oil—but there is a way forward.

Voices

A woman carrying a child waits at a makeshift clinic at the Internally Displaced Persons (IDP) camp of al-Hol in al-Hasakeh governorate in northeastern Syria on February 7, 2019.

Assad’s Syria Is Starting to Starve Like Saddam’s Iraq

How sanctions against the Syrian regime are forcing the country into famine.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Chinese Premier Li Keqiang during the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP) summit in Bangkok on Nov. 4, 2019.

Cutting Through the Hype on Asia’s New Trade Deal

The RCEP truly is a China-style trade agreement: platitudinous and ineffective.

A team of dressmakers works in a factory in Dhaka, Bangladesh, on Nov. 22, 2012.

Bangladesh Is Everyone’s Economic Darling. It Might Not Last.

Dhaka has shown real vision in its fiscal planning, but a turn toward authoritarianism could reverse its successes.

Saudi and foreign media representatives listen to Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman remotely addressing a press conference, at the G20 summit's Media Center in the capital Riyadh, on November 22, 2020.

Mohammed bin Salman’s Human Rights Mirage

Saudi Arabia’s recent social reforms are more about earning international attention than improving the lives of its citizens at home.

A FOCUS ON RACE AND FOREIGN POLICY

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Why Is Mainstream International Relations Blind to Racism?

Ignoring the central role of race and colonialism in world affairs precludes an accurate understanding of the modern state system.

Black Lives Matter Protest London

When Did Racism Become Solely a Domestic Issue?

International relations theorists once explored racism. What has the field lost by giving that up?

Then-Libyan leader Muammar al-Qaddafi (R) speaks with presidents Jacob Zuma of South Africa (L) and Denis Sassou Nguesso of Republic of Congo (C) in Tripoli on April 10, 2011 during a meeting with a high-ranking African Union delegation trying to negotiate a truce between Qaddafi's forces and rebels seeking to oust him.

By Ignoring African Leaders, the West Paved the Way for Chaos in Libya

A race-based colonial mindset that views the continent as Europe’s playground and dismisses the concerns of Africans continues to fuel death and destruction.

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Why Race Matters in International Relations

Western dominance and white privilege permeate the field. It’s time to change that.

Special insights on the post-pandemic world

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Culture Shock

Eight voices on the future of entertainment, culture, and sports.

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The Future of Travel

Seven predictions for how tourism will change.

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Will Schools and Universities Ever Return to Normal?

Nine experts on the future of education after the pandemic.

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The Future of the State

Ten leading global thinkers on government after the pandemic.

visual stories

A damaged clock is pictured inside a classroom at Kabul University in Afghanistan on Nov. 3 after an attack that killed at least 19 people. Mohammad Ismail/REUTERS

The Month in World Photos

November brought results in the U.S. presidential election and a sharp rise in coronavirus cases around the world—plus a deadly attack at an Afghanistan university and devastating storms in Central America and the Philippines.

A Russian peacekeeper in Nagorno-Karabakh

Russian Troops in Nagorno-Karabakh ‘Clearly a Win for Moscow’

The Russian-brokered cease-fire that ended six weeks of fighting means soldiers on the ground—either as peacekeepers or as a vanguard of Putin’s latest garrison state.