Demonstrators call on the U.S. government to commit to a global coronavirus vaccination plan that includes sharing vaccine formulas, on the National Mall in Washington on May 5.

Big Pharma’s Patent Defeat Shows Corporate America Losing Power

The unloved industry could try to fight Biden—or get behind the global drive to vaccinate.

The front of the U.S. Embassy in Havana

Claims of Microwave Attacks Are Scientifically Implausible

There’s little evidence for an unknown weapon being behind “Havana syndrome.”

Frontline COVID-19 coronavirus warriors such as health workers, patients ambulance drivers, crematorium workers, wearing Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) suits hold Indian national flags as part of the Independence Day celebrations in Kolkata on August 15, 2020.

COVID-19 Is India’s Great Leveler

The coronavirus pandemic has flattened the country’s social order and turned its political divisions upside down.

Facebook co-founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies before the House Financial Services Committee in the Rayburn House Office Building in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 23, 2019.

Is Facebook a Failed State?

In deciding what to do about Donald Trump, the platform’s own “Supreme Court” punted.

Demonstrators protest sexual assaults on women in Kolkata, India.

Report Back Better

The State Department’s yearly human rights report may be the United States’ best tool for fighting sexual violence. Biden needs to get it right.

Facebook extends Trump ban

Extending the Trump Ban Won’t Heal Facebook’s Deeper Sickness

Apple cutting the social media giant off from iPhone user data could force a healthy change.

U.S. President Joe Biden and Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga take part in a joint press conference in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington on April 16.

What the United States Wants From Japan in Taiwan

Biden should be clear about potential wartime plans now or else risk being disappointed by delays in Tokyo.

Billboards feature Mohammed bin Salman and Imran Khan.

Can Imran Khan Change the Course of Saudi-Pakistani Relations?

Pakistan and Saudi Arabia’s relationship is walking a fine line.

Former U.S. President Bill Clinton speaks at a mobile treatment center.

Stopping Drug Patents Has Stopped Pandemics Before

Loosening property rules over coronavirus vaccines is likely to accelerate—not stifle—the pharmaceutical industry’s creativity.

A demonstrator holds a Palestinian flag near an electoral billboard for the predominantly Arab Israeli electoral alliance, the Joint List, depicting Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu with a caption reading in Arabic "whom is he fooling?" in the mostly Arab city of Umm al-Fahm in northern Israel on March 12.

How Netanyahu Learned to Love Israeli Arab Parties

The prime minister who once presented Arab citizens and political leaders as a threat has legitimized them as potential coalition partners.

In the Magazine

In the Magazine

biden-foreign-policy-report-card-100-days-nicolas-ortega-illustration

The Biden 100-Day Progress Report

We asked 25 experts to grade the administration’s start on foreign policy

An illustration combining images of Janet Yellen and Mario Draghi.

Janet Yellen and Mario Draghi Have One Last Job

The U.S. treasury secretary and the Italian prime minister have spent decades shaping this economy. But can they control what comes next?

How Biden Will—and Won’t—Battle the Pentagon

What the new president really thinks about the military—and what the military really thinks about him.

The Most Vital 100 Days Since FDR

Just like Roosevelt, Biden must show that government still works.

Joe Biden waves to supporters before meeting with local labor leaders ahead at the union's state headquarters on Sept. 7, 2020 in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.

America Is Becoming a Social Democracy

The Biden administration is accomplishing what was once thought historically impossible.

Korean Catholics attend a mass.

‘Minari’ Is About Korean American Faith as Well as Family

The U.S.-Korea relationship has always been shaped by Korean Christianity.

U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken speaks during a meeting in Kyiv on May 6.

In Kyiv, Blinken Shows a New Face for the U.S.

After Trump, Biden’s top diplomat works to patch up relations with Ukraine—and with beleaguered U.S. diplomats

Taiwan's President Tsai Ing-wen visits an air force base

As U.S. Hardens Line on Beijing, Taiwan’s Stock Rises in Washington

Taiwan doesn’t have a U.S. embassy. But it’s got plenty of influence—and more to come.

Supporters of the Indian National Congress party supported the Communist Party of India’s march during the fifth phase of legislative assembly elections in Siliguri, India, on April 13.

As Modi’s BJP Stalls, Can the Congress Party Rev Up?

Last week’s elections showed the Hindu nationalist party isn’t invincible, but the opposition will need to change tactics if it wants to stage a comeback.

U.S. Vice President Kamala Harris conducts a bilateral meeting with Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador.

Can Kamala Harris Resurrect the Alliance for Prosperity?

The vice president’s plan for Central America depends on tackling rising corruption.

A man types on his smart phone in Iran.

Outdated U.S. Policies Are Helping Iran Censor Its Citizens

Unclear guidelines and fear of sanctions are stopping tech companies from selling products that would help Iranians access the internet freely and evade government surveillance.

Voices

Thierry Breton puts a sticker with the European Union flag on a box containing Pfizer-BioNtech Covid-19 vaccines in Puurs, Belgium on Feb. 22, 2021.

Industrial Policy Saved Europe’s Vaccine Drive

The EU got its act together not by banning exports but through classic cooperation with industry.

An Indian soldier watches a British Royal Air Force Chinook helicopter at the United Nations' headquarters in Freetown, Sierra Leone, on May 9, 2000.

How Wars End

The shifting nature of war has made peacemaking more difficult. A new kind of back-channel diplomacy can help.

A protester carries a sign in the West Bank.

Israel’s Apartheid Doesn’t Make a Difference

A new report about the Israel-Palestine conflict is morally damning—and politically irrelevant.

Members of the 105th Regiment Royal Artillery fire a 41-round gun salute to mark the death of the Duke of Edinburgh at Edinburgh Castle on April 10.

The U.K. Still Knows How to Punch Above Its Weight

The recent defense review lays out how to be a midsize power in a superpower world.

A FOCUS ON RACE AND FOREIGN POLICY

race-international-relations-colonialism-foreign-policy-illustration

Why Is Mainstream International Relations Blind to Racism?

Ignoring the central role of race and colonialism in world affairs precludes an accurate understanding of the modern state system.

Black Lives Matter Protest London

When Did Racism Become Solely a Domestic Issue?

International relations theorists once explored racism. What has the field lost by giving that up?

Thousands of people gather at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington to call for police and criminal justice reforms.

Put Racial Justice at Center of the Biden-Harris Transition Plan

The new administration can learn from South Africa’s experience with transitional justice.

George Floyd mural unveiled in Brooklyn.

As America Seeks Racial Justice, It Can Learn From Abroad

Other countries offer good lessons for acknowledging and redressing past wrongs.

visual stories

A man prays for a relative who died from COVID-19 at a crematorium in New Delhi on April 20. Anindito Mukherjee/Getty Images

The Month in World Photos

April brought a devastating COVID surge in India—plus the death of a royal in England, a raging fire in Northern Ireland, and a closely watched verdict in the United States.

Jane Tomushana, whose husband was killed by an elephant while collecting firewood from inside the park, stands outside her home in Kyambura on Feb. 6, 2020.

When Nature Conservation Goes Wrong

Environmentalists’ intent on saving the planet by protecting natural habitats are creating human disasters of their own.