Billboards feature Mohammed bin Salman and Imran Khan.

Can Imran Khan Change the Course of Saudi-Pakistani Relations?

Pakistan and Saudi Arabia’s relationship is walking a fine line.

Bill Clinton speaks on August 3, 2008 at the Mobile Treatment Centre (CTA) at the CHU of Fann in Dakar during a four-nation African tour.

Stopping Drug Patents Has Stopped Pandemics Before

Loosening property rules over coronavirus vaccines is likely to accelerate—not stifle—the pharmaceutical industry’s creativity.

In the Magazine

In the Magazine

biden-foreign-policy-report-card-100-days-nicolas-ortega-illustration

The Biden 100-Day Progress Report

We asked 25 experts to grade the administration’s start on foreign policy

An illustration combining images of Janet Yellen and Mario Draghi.

Janet Yellen and Mario Draghi Have One Last Job

The U.S. treasury secretary and the Italian prime minister have spent decades shaping this economy. But can they control what comes next?

How Biden Will—and Won’t—Battle the Pentagon

What the new president really thinks about the military—and what the military really thinks about him.

The Most Vital 100 Days Since FDR

Just like Roosevelt, Biden must show that government still works.

U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken speaks during a meeting in Kyiv on May 6.

In Kyiv, Blinken Shows a New Face for the U.S.

After Trump, Biden’s top diplomat works to patch up relations with Ukraine—and with beleaguered U.S. diplomats

Israeli security forces patrol outside the Damascus Gate in Jerusalem’s Old City on April 24.

Washington Has Enabled Israeli Extremism

Failure to condemn anti-Palestinian violence will only further it.

Demonstrators clash with riot police during a protest against President Ivan Duque's government at the Bolivar square in Bogota on May 5.

Unrest Returns to Colombia Over COVID-19 and Police Violence

The pandemic has increased debt in Latin America, and paying up may stoke social tensions.

Supporters of the Indian National Congress party supported the Communist Party of India’s march during the fifth phase of legislative assembly elections in Siliguri, India, on April 13.

As Modi’s BJP Stalls, Can the Congress Party Rev Up?

Last week’s elections showed the Hindu nationalist party isn’t invincible, but the opposition will need to change tactics if it wants to stage a comeback.

Taiwan's President Tsai Ing-wen visits an air force base

As U.S. Hardens Line on Beijing, Taiwan’s Stock Rises in Washington

Taiwan doesn’t have a U.S. embassy. But it’s got plenty of influence—and more to come.

Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon

Sturgeon’s Vision for Independence Is on the Ballot in Scotland

The first minister’s party will almost certainly win the election this week, but the nationalist movement still faces divisions of its own.

A demonstrator holds a Palestinian flag near an electoral billboard for the predominantly Arab Israeli electoral alliance, the Joint List, depicting Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu with a caption reading in Arabic "whom is he fooling?" in the mostly Arab city of Umm al-Fahm in northern Israel on March 12.

How Netanyahu Learned to Love Israeli Arab Parties

The prime minister who once presented Arab citizens and political leaders as a threat has legitimized them as potential coalition partners.

Protest in support of Alexei Navalny in Vladivostok, Russia

With Putin’s Latest Crackdown, Russia Is Going Dark

As it goes full authoritarian, the Kremlin is targeting the last vestiges of civil society and independent media.

A man types on his smart phone in Iran.

Outdated U.S. Policies Are Helping Iran Censor Its Citizens

Unclear guidelines and fear of sanctions are stopping tech companies from selling products that would help Iranians access the internet freely and evade government surveillance.

Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison speaks to the media.

Australia Draws a Line on China

Canberra’s had enough of trade embargoes and Chinese grievances—and is ready to draw a line.

A train leaves Xian International Port in Shaanxi province, China, for Kazakhstan on April 13.

What Kazakhstan Can Teach About Medium-State Diplomacy

How the self-styled “Asian Geneva” successfully navigated among Russia, China, and the West—at least for now.

Members of the 105th Regiment Royal Artillery fire a 41-round gun salute to mark the death of the Duke of Edinburgh at Edinburgh Castle on April 10.

The U.K. Still Knows How to Punch Above Its Weight

The recent defense review lays out how to be a midsize power in a superpower world.

Slovak Prime Minister Igor Matovic attends a press conference in Vienna.

The Rise and Fall of Igor Matovic

Slovakia’s prime minister lost his job to the pandemic, but his example serves as a warning to other corruption-fighters lacking governing experience.

An Ethiopian Muslim stands in a damaged building at the al-Nejashi Mosque, one of the oldest in Africa and allegedly damaged by Eritrean shelling, in Negash, Ethiopia on March 1.

Why Eritrea Won’t Leave Ethiopia

Eritrea’s Isaias Afwerki has long coveted access to Ethiopia’s economy. His alliance with Abiy Ahmed will let him achieve his goals at the expense of Ethiopian sovereignty.

Voices

A protester carries a sign in the West Bank.

Israel’s Apartheid Doesn’t Make a Difference

A new report about the Israel-Palestine conflict is morally damning—and politically irrelevant.

The U.S. and Chinese flags stand behind a microphone.

The World Might Want China’s Rules

Washington shouldn’t assume its values are more attractive to others than Beijing’s.

Biden addresses Congress at the Capitol.

Biden’s Goldilocks Foreign Policy

“America is back” wrestles with the lingering imprint of “America First.”

Joe Biden speaks at a business leader breakfast.

What Comes After the Forever Wars

An era of U.S. grand strategy is now ending. Here’s what should come next.

A FOCUS ON RACE AND FOREIGN POLICY

race-international-relations-colonialism-foreign-policy-illustration

Why Is Mainstream International Relations Blind to Racism?

Ignoring the central role of race and colonialism in world affairs precludes an accurate understanding of the modern state system.

Black Lives Matter Protest London

When Did Racism Become Solely a Domestic Issue?

International relations theorists once explored racism. What has the field lost by giving that up?

Thousands of people gather at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington to call for police and criminal justice reforms.

Put Racial Justice at Center of the Biden-Harris Transition Plan

The new administration can learn from South Africa’s experience with transitional justice.

George Floyd mural unveiled in Brooklyn.

As America Seeks Racial Justice, It Can Learn From Abroad

Other countries offer good lessons for acknowledging and redressing past wrongs.

visual stories

A man prays for a relative who died from COVID-19 at a crematorium in New Delhi on April 20. Anindito Mukherjee/Getty Images

The Month in World Photos

April brought a devastating COVID surge in India—plus the death of a royal in England, a raging fire in Northern Ireland, and a closely watched verdict in the United States.

Jane Tomushana, whose husband was killed by an elephant while collecting firewood from inside the park, stands outside her home in Kyambura on Feb. 6, 2020.

When Nature Conservation Goes Wrong

Environmentalists’ intent on saving the planet by protecting natural habitats are creating human disasters of their own.