Pedro Nicolaci da Costa


Pedro Nicolaci da Costa is editorial fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics. He spent over a decade covering the Federal Reserve, first at Reuters then The Wall Street Journal.
Articles by Pedro Nicolaci da Costa
House Speaker Paul Ryan listens to US President-elect Donald Trump speak to the press at the Capitol in Washington, DC, on November 10, 2016. / AFP / NICHOLAS KAMM        (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
House Speaker Paul Ryan listens to US President-elect Donald Trump speak to the press at the Capitol in Washington, DC, on November 10, 2016. / AFP / NICHOLAS KAMM (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - DECEMBER 08:  Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) on December 8, 2016 in New York City. Stocks began today higher following yesterday's rally, the best day for the market since the presidential election.  (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - DECEMBER 08: Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) on December 8, 2016 in New York City. Stocks began today higher following yesterday's rally, the best day for the market since the presidential election. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
A man stands and smokes a cigarette alongside a board diplaying the price of Euro and US dollars against British pound Sterling, outside a currency exchange store in central London on October 13, 2016.
Dutch food giant Unilever, reportedly caught up in a pricing war with a British supermarket chain, warned Thursday the falling pound will likely hike its prices in Britain. The British pound has faced turbulence recently, last week plummeting against the dollar to its lowest level for 31 years, amid uncertainty over the impact of the country's planned Brexit from the European Union. / AFP / Adrian DENNIS        (Photo credit should read ADRIAN DENNIS/AFP/Getty Images)
A man stands and smokes a cigarette alongside a board diplaying the price of Euro and US dollars against British pound Sterling, outside a currency exchange store in central London on October 13, 2016. Dutch food giant Unilever, reportedly caught up in a pricing war with a British supermarket chain, warned Thursday the falling pound will likely hike its prices in Britain. The British pound has faced turbulence recently, last week plummeting against the dollar to its lowest level for 31 years, amid uncertainty over the impact of the country's planned Brexit from the European Union. / AFP / Adrian DENNIS (Photo credit should read ADRIAN DENNIS/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON - OCTOBER 14:  The words "In God We Trust" are seen on U.S. currency October 14, 2004 in Washington, DC. Although the U.S. constitution prohibits an official state religion, references to God appear on American money, the U.S. Congress starts its daily session with a prayer, and the same U.S. Supreme Court that has consistently struck down organized prayer in public schools as unconstitutional opens its public sessions by asking for the blessings of God. The Supreme Court will soon use cases from Kentucky and Texas to consider the constitutionality of Ten Commandments displays on government property, addressing a church-state issue that has ignited controversy around the country.  (Photo Illustration by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON - OCTOBER 14: The words "In God We Trust" are seen on U.S. currency October 14, 2004 in Washington, DC. Although the U.S. constitution prohibits an official state religion, references to God appear on American money, the U.S. Congress starts its daily session with a prayer, and the same U.S. Supreme Court that has consistently struck down organized prayer in public schools as unconstitutional opens its public sessions by asking for the blessings of God. The Supreme Court will soon use cases from Kentucky and Texas to consider the constitutionality of Ten Commandments displays on government property, addressing a church-state issue that has ignited controversy around the country. (Photo Illustration by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
SAN FRANCISCO, CA - MAY 17:  Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf speaks at the Bay Area Council Outlook Conference on May 17, 2016 in San Francisco, California. In January, the investment research company Morningstar named as its 2015 CEO of the year Stumpf, who beat out two other nominees Jeff Bezos of Amazon and Jeff Immelt of General Electric.  (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
SAN FRANCISCO, CA - MAY 17: Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf speaks at the Bay Area Council Outlook Conference on May 17, 2016 in San Francisco, California. In January, the investment research company Morningstar named as its 2015 CEO of the year Stumpf, who beat out two other nominees Jeff Bezos of Amazon and Jeff Immelt of General Electric. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
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