U.S. soldiers sweep through an abandoned house during heavy fighting in the insurgent stronghold of Fallujah, Iraq, on Nov. 9, 2004.

A U.S. Marine Looks Back at Fallujah

On the podcast: Elliot Ackerman served five tours of duty in Iraq and Afghanistan.

White House National Security Advisor John Bolton listens to U.S. President Donald Trump as he and Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte talk to reporters in the Oval Office at the White House on July 18.

Iran Overtures Are the Latest Setback for Bolton 

Trump’s hawkish national security advisor may be losing credibility fast as the president pushes diplomacy, observers say.

Document of the Week: Trump Administration Shrinks Iran’s U.S. Footprint

With the State Department imposing new travel restrictions on Iranian diplomats, New York City influencers trek across town to see Tehran’s foreign minister.

An F-35 Lightning II fighter jet lands at the Payerne Air Base in Switzerland on June 7.

The United States and Turkey Peer Over the Cliff

With the cancellation of F-35 sales to Turkey, relations between Washington and Ankara have reached a new low. Here are our top reads on how things got so bad—and what comes next.

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky speaks to the media following talks with German Chancellor Angela Merkel on June 18 in Berlin.

What to Watch in Ukraine’s Elections

Plus: The U.S. downs a drone in the Persian Gulf, more Brexit drama in the British Parliament, and the other stories we’re following today.

This photograph, posed as an illustration on May 12, 2017, shows the website of the NHS: East and North Hertfordshire notifying users of the aftermath of a cyberattack on its network taken in London.

Cyber Deterrence Needs People, Not Weapons

Mass mobilization might be the best line of defense in a world of online warfare.

Benjamin Netanyahu attends a memorial ceremony for Israel's first prime minister, David Ben-Gurion, in Sde Boker, Israel on Nov. 14, 2010.

Netanyahu Keeps Winning Because He’s an Effective Leader

Israel’s prime minister has now served in the role for as long as the country’s founding father. Voters support him because they’re convinced he keeps them safe and reduces their international isolation.

Police stand guard on the street in front of the Colosseum near concrete blocks placed to prevent vehicle attacks in central Rome on Aug. 26, 2017.

Is Italy Immune From Terrorism?

In recent years, the country has managed to avoid jihadi violence. But not everyone will want to copy its methods.

A Filipino man shouts slogans as he takes part in an anti-China protest outside the Chinese Embassy in Makati, Metro Manila, Philippines, on July 12.

Is Duterte Really Asking for U.S. Aid Against China?

The volatile Philippine leader is trying to fend off accusations of being soft on Beijing.

Colombian soldiers stand guard as they patrol the outskirts of Medellin, Antioquia department, on June 6.

Alarmed by Venezuela, U.S. Military Seeks to Sell Arms to Colombia

The Air Force wants a key regional ally to get new F-16 fighter jets to deter threats from Caracas.

Estonian President Kersti Kaljulaid leaves the Élysée Palace after a Bastille Day working lunch during the visit of European leaders in Paris on July 14.

Estonia Battles Its Elected Racists

Estonian President Kersti Kaljulaid speaks on how to stand up against the far-right.

Handwritten notes are stuck on a boat used by migrants on Los Caños de Meca beach near Barbate, Spain, on Nov. 26, 2018.

Europe’s Future Will Be Decided in North Africa

The United States should stop treating the region as secondary to the rest of the Middle East.

A caricature of Hong Kong police superintendent Rupert Dover by the Chinese artist Badiucao, July 2019.

Hong Kong’s Police Violence Is Stamped ‘Made in U.K.’

Modern riot control tactics were born in the city’s 1960s riots. Now they’re back with a vengeance.

Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (L) walks with France's President Emmanuel Macron during an official ceremony at the prime minister's official residence in Tokyo on June 26, 2019. (Photo by Blondet Eliot / POOL / AFP)        (Photo credit should read BLONDET ELIOT/AFP/Getty Images)

France Is Looking for New Allies in Asia

Eager to project its power in the Indo-Pacific, the country has doubled down on Japan and India.

Russian Sukhoi Su-35 and Su-34 military aircrafts fly above the Ivan the Great Bell Tower during a rehearsal for the Victory Day military parade in central Moscow on May 4, 2017. (NATALIA KOLESNIKOVA/AFP/Getty Images)

After Rupture with U.S., Turkey Looks to Russia for Fighter Jets

Ankara may buy Moscow’s most advanced Su-57 after its expulsion from the F-35 program.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo pictured with Mexican Secretary of Foreign Affairs Marcelo Ebrard in Mexico City on July 13, 2018.

Pompeo Heads to Latin America

Plus: A tight vote expected in Britain’s House of Commons, ethnonationalists declare a new region in Ethiopia, and the other stories we’re following today.

U.S. President Donald Trump applauds at the end of Chinese President Xi Jinping's speech during a business leaders event in Beijing on Nov. 9, 2017.

The Abyss Is Opening Under China-U.S. Relations

Cool heads are needed in both Beijing and Washington.

A trompe l’oeil shows two workers painting the European Union flag on the side of a building in Paris on May 23.

Europe Is Back

Long deemed strategically irrelevant by the United States, the EU is poised to become a major geopolitical power. Washington should take note.

Cars pass by a memorial to American soldiers from New York state who were killed in Iraq or Afghanistan, near Canandaigua, New York, on June 4.

Limited Wars Are Forever Wars

A new book looks at why the U.S. military keeps trapping itself in endless conflicts.

Pakistan’s Prime Minister Imran Khan, second right, attends a meeting with China’s President Xi Jinping in Beijing on April 28.

Imran Khan Mustn’t Let Trump Make Pakistan a Scapegoat

Almost four decades after the first U.S.-Pakistani mission in Afghanistan, Islamabad risks getting caught in the crosshairs of great-power politics again. Only deft diplomacy will save it.

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